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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
When they opened Eldersburg's County Cork Wine Pub in 2010, business partners Arlene Stecher and Chris McManus were thinking of their neighbors. McManus and Stecher, both Eldersburg residents, wanted to build a spot where adults could gather with their friends, enjoying good food and drinks. They succeeded - and those neighbors have noticed. On a recent Thursday night, County Cork Wine Pub was packed with couples and chatty groups of friends. We lucked into the last available spot, a high-top table in an alcove toward the back of the restaurant.
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NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  BALLYHOO Living as we do in a culture of promotion, self-promotion, exaggeration, and sensationalism, it is good that we have a fine old American word, both noun and verb, to apply to the phenomenon. Ballyhoo  (pronounced BAL-ee-hoo) is ever so much more colorful and evocative than hype , the clipped, gray, featureless word more commonly in use today.  The etymological origins are obscure and the subject of much fanciful speculation,* but the various authorities agree that ballyhoo emerged in the United States around 1900, perhaps as the spiel of carnival barkers trying to draw customers to a performance.
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FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | March 10, 1991
Guaranteed: Reading about Ballymaloe House will make you hungry. Hungry for fresh, abundant fare prepared with a combination of Irish simplicity and Continental finesse by owner Myrtle Allen and her cadre of chefs. Hungry, too, for life as it is lived in this 500-year-old County Cork farmhouse, which has gained a reputation as one of Ireland's most elegant small hotels.Both the food and the place are vividly evoked in "Myrtle Allen's Cooking at Ballymaloe House," recently published by Stewart, Tabori and Chang.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
When they opened Eldersburg's County Cork Wine Pub in 2010, business partners Arlene Stecher and Chris McManus were thinking of their neighbors. McManus and Stecher, both Eldersburg residents, wanted to build a spot where adults could gather with their friends, enjoying good food and drinks. They succeeded - and those neighbors have noticed. On a recent Thursday night, County Cork Wine Pub was packed with couples and chatty groups of friends. We lucked into the last available spot, a high-top table in an alcove toward the back of the restaurant.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Staff Writer | September 12, 1993
Baltimore, Ireland -- More than 300 years ago, Algerian pirates sailed into this placid harbor, put a number of Baltimoreans to the sword and took a hundred or so more off to a life of great discomfort, probably in the Magreb.To avoid further abuse at the hands of such cutthroats, the surviving Baltimoreans hastily rowed up the Ilen River about eight miles, where they established the town of Skibbereen. There they set about regaining their self-confidence, even cultivating a certain doughty impudence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | April 4, 2002
A Maryland native recalls the landscape Baltimore County native Tom Fehsenfeld has lived on Bainbridge Island near Seattle for 18 years but has never forgotten the landscape of his youth. His remembered Maryland landscapes, figurative encaustic paintings and recent paintings of County Cork, Ireland, are the subject of a one-man show at Paper-Rock-Scissors gallery in Hampden that runs through May 12. The opening reception is today from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The gallery is at 1111 W. 36th St. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, noon to 5 p.m. Sundays.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  BALLYHOO Living as we do in a culture of promotion, self-promotion, exaggeration, and sensationalism, it is good that we have a fine old American word, both noun and verb, to apply to the phenomenon. Ballyhoo  (pronounced BAL-ee-hoo) is ever so much more colorful and evocative than hype , the clipped, gray, featureless word more commonly in use today.  The etymological origins are obscure and the subject of much fanciful speculation,* but the various authorities agree that ballyhoo emerged in the United States around 1900, perhaps as the spiel of carnival barkers trying to draw customers to a performance.
NEWS
June 11, 2001
John `Jack' McAuliffe, 74, coffee plant employee John "Jack" McAuliffe, an Irish immigrant and Korean War veteran who worked for the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. for about 40 years, died Tuesday of a heart attack at St. Agnes HealthCare. He was 74 and had lived in Arbutus since 1959. Born in County Cork, Ireland, in 1926, Mr. McAuliffe moved to Baltimore in 1949 and went to work for A&P -- now Super Fresh Food Markets -- at its 8 O'clock Coffee plant on Edmondson Avenue. A year later, he was in the Army, serving on the front lines in Korea as a telephone lineman.
FEATURES
By Margaret M. Johnson and Margaret M. Johnson,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 16, 1994
The idea of a boiled dinner does have a ring of convenience to it. For traditionalists, corned beef, cabbage, potatoes and carrots (my family added turnips as well) cooked together in one pot is the best way to celebrate on St. Patrick's Day. The fact that you have only one pot to wash, and the flavors of all the vegetables are blended together to taste like straight cabbage, somehow appeals to Irish-Americans who already carry the reputation of not knowing -- or caring -- anything about fine dining.
NEWS
November 29, 2007
Sister Marie Joyce O'Keeffe, a retired parochial school teacher and official of the Sisters of St. Francis, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Friday at her order's retirement home in Aston, Pa. She was 89. Born Catherine O'Keeffe in Boherbu, County Cork, Ireland, she entered the Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia in 1936 and received the name Marie Joyce. She earned a bachelor's degree in education from Mount St. Mary's University in Emmitsburg and had a master's degree from St. Bonaventure University in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | April 4, 2002
A Maryland native recalls the landscape Baltimore County native Tom Fehsenfeld has lived on Bainbridge Island near Seattle for 18 years but has never forgotten the landscape of his youth. His remembered Maryland landscapes, figurative encaustic paintings and recent paintings of County Cork, Ireland, are the subject of a one-man show at Paper-Rock-Scissors gallery in Hampden that runs through May 12. The opening reception is today from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The gallery is at 1111 W. 36th St. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, noon to 5 p.m. Sundays.
NEWS
June 11, 2001
John `Jack' McAuliffe, 74, coffee plant employee John "Jack" McAuliffe, an Irish immigrant and Korean War veteran who worked for the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. for about 40 years, died Tuesday of a heart attack at St. Agnes HealthCare. He was 74 and had lived in Arbutus since 1959. Born in County Cork, Ireland, in 1926, Mr. McAuliffe moved to Baltimore in 1949 and went to work for A&P -- now Super Fresh Food Markets -- at its 8 O'clock Coffee plant on Edmondson Avenue. A year later, he was in the Army, serving on the front lines in Korea as a telephone lineman.
FEATURES
By Margaret M. Johnson and Margaret M. Johnson,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 16, 1994
The idea of a boiled dinner does have a ring of convenience to it. For traditionalists, corned beef, cabbage, potatoes and carrots (my family added turnips as well) cooked together in one pot is the best way to celebrate on St. Patrick's Day. The fact that you have only one pot to wash, and the flavors of all the vegetables are blended together to taste like straight cabbage, somehow appeals to Irish-Americans who already carry the reputation of not knowing -- or caring -- anything about fine dining.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Staff Writer | September 12, 1993
Baltimore, Ireland -- More than 300 years ago, Algerian pirates sailed into this placid harbor, put a number of Baltimoreans to the sword and took a hundred or so more off to a life of great discomfort, probably in the Magreb.To avoid further abuse at the hands of such cutthroats, the surviving Baltimoreans hastily rowed up the Ilen River about eight miles, where they established the town of Skibbereen. There they set about regaining their self-confidence, even cultivating a certain doughty impudence.
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | March 10, 1991
Guaranteed: Reading about Ballymaloe House will make you hungry. Hungry for fresh, abundant fare prepared with a combination of Irish simplicity and Continental finesse by owner Myrtle Allen and her cadre of chefs. Hungry, too, for life as it is lived in this 500-year-old County Cork farmhouse, which has gained a reputation as one of Ireland's most elegant small hotels.Both the food and the place are vividly evoked in "Myrtle Allen's Cooking at Ballymaloe House," recently published by Stewart, Tabori and Chang.
NEWS
August 26, 1997
Americans who saw the broadly accurate film, "Michael Collins," last year, know his importance as militant terrorist, moderate statesman and charismatic general in founding the Irish state. Fewer will remember that Aug. 22 was the 75th anniversary of his ambush death at the hands of the IRA during the Irish Civil War.But in Clonakilty, a lovely town on the County Cork coast midway between Cork and Baltimore, they know. The Big Fella, the George Washington of Ireland, was born there. The ambush was nearby.
NEWS
By [CATHERINE SUDUE] | May 4, 2008
DIRECTOR OF THE BALTIMORE MUSEUM OF ART DOREEN BOLGER AFTER 10 YEARS ON THE JOB, Doreen Bolger says she still finds it thrilling. "I am most excited when I see people walking through galleries engaged in art and finding meaning to them," she says. Currently she is busy working on the Janet & Walter Sondheim Prize art exhibition, in which one of six finalists will be awarded $25,000. "We have such great artists in this city," says Bolger, who resides in Charles Village. 1 Henri Matisse cutout for the BMA "The BMA has the world's largest collection of his work, but we don't have a cutout.
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