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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | December 15, 1994
NEW YORK -- Orange County's loss on its investment portfolio is creating a bonanza for those brokerages and investors who snapped up bonds at depressed prices.The Southern California county, which lost about $2.02 billion on its investments in the debt of government-related agencies, is unloading the bonds to avert further losses.Although the county has stressed it won't hold a "fire-sale" of the securities, investors expect it to sell bonds at bargain prices to get them off its books."It's an excellent opportunity, as evidenced by the fact that about $1 billion of [agency bonds]
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November 17, 2011
WESTMINSTER - Carroll County conducted its annual bond sale last week, selling some $30.2 million in bonds to finance $18.8 million for infrastructure and capital improvement projects, and $11.4 million to refinance existing debt at lower rates. The bond sale followed the annual review of the county's rating by various credit rating agencies. Those agencies generally gave the county high ranks. The county was rated AAA by Fitch Ratings service in New York; Aa1 by Moody's credit service, a rating that signifies very low risk; and AA+ by Standard & Poors, a designation that also signifies very low risk.
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NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1994
A series of Harford County bonds recently received triple-A ratings from three national bond-rating agencies, the highest designation ever received by the county.The bonds were upgraded from "Aa" to "Aaa" by Moody's Investors Service, from "AA" to "AAA" by Fitch's Investor's Service and from "AA" to "AAA" by Standard & Poor's.The ratings affect $33.8 million in general obligation bonds and tax-backed water and sewer bonds that are being refunded by proceeds of a sale last fall to take advantage of lower interest rates.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
When Pat Hatch first started the Howard County nonprofit that assists foreign-born residents in 1981, there were far fewer people in need of help. But 30 years later, one in six county residents — or 43,000 — was born in another country, Hatch said at the county executive's annual public budget public hearing Wednesday night at the George Howard Building. "We are struggling to keep up with the growth in the immigrant population" in the county, she said of FIRN, a service that helps immigrants assimilate by providing access to community resources.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1996
Also yesterday, it was incorrectly reported that Standard & Poor's Corp. raised its rating on $516 million of state of Maryland general obligation bonds. In fact, Standard & Poor's raised its rating on $516 million of Baltimore County general obligation bonds to AAA. Maryland general obligation bonds are already rated AAA.The Sun regrets the errors.Standard & Poor's Corp. yesterday raised its ratings on certain Maryland state and Baltimore County bonds to AAA in a move that the rating agency said reflects "a deep and broad economy that continues to exhibit diversification."
NEWS
January 22, 1995
Anne Arundel County maintained its favorable bond ratings in reports issued last week by the county's three major investors services in anticipation of this week's bond sale.Fitch Investors Service and Standard & Poor's Corp. both gave the $86.9 million worth of bonds to be sold Wednesday a favorable AA+ rating. Moody's Investors Service gave the bonds an Aa rating, a notch below the Aa1 rating given the county bonds issued before the property tax limit went into effect in fiscal year 1993-1994.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1998
Baltimore County has awarded four contracts totaling $1.75 million for the protection and restoration of Hart Miller Island and several county streams."
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 16, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- The Securities & Exchange Commission's investigation into the Orange County, Calif., bankruptcy has shifted to the county's elected Board of Supervisors, even as the agency's chairman suggested that voters should throw the five-member board out of office.Late Wednesday, the SEC subpoenaed records of the supervisors that relate to the sale of bonds by the county. But county officials yesterday said a letter to the board from the SEC assured them that the request for documents "should not be construed as an indication by the commission that any violations of the law have occurred."
NEWS
April 19, 1991
The county sold almost $37.2 million in general obligation bonds Wednesday at an interest rate more than half a point below last year's rate.The lower rate -- from 6.8 percent to 6.28 percent -- will save the county $175,000 in debt when fiscal year 1992 begins July 1.The bonds -- backed by tax revenue -- are used to pay for major capital projects such as expansion of the circuit courthouse in Annapolis and light rail.Although the county took in $9 million less this year than budget analysts had predicted, three Wall Street bond rating companies renewed their second-highest ranking for Anne Arundel credit last week.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | November 3, 1993
Carroll County is likely to pay a low interest rate on general-obligation bonds that will be used to finance almost $12 million in capital projects next year, the county's bond counsel said yesterday."
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
The pressures of the election might be over, but Howard County's elected officials are looking at continuing fiscal pressures in what could be their toughest budget season yet as the county faces nearly flat revenue after more than two years of cuts. County budget director Raymond S. Wacks told the County Council on Monday morning that revenue is still on track to avoid any shortfall in the budget year ending June 30, and the county preserved its coveted AAA bond rating for a $165 million bond sale slated for this week.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | February 28, 2010
Howard County officials ceremonially broke ground on the $30 million Charles E. Miller Library and Historical Center in Ellicott City on Monday before a crowd of more than 100 people. Construction is to begin in earnest this spring, and the building is to be finished by December 2011. The long-planned, 63,000-square-foot, two-story stone, glass and metal "green" building is to rise in what is now a cornfield behind the current 23,000-square-foot library, which dates to 1962, in the 9400 block of Frederick Road.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 16, 2010
Howard County's coveted AAA bond credit rating was renewed for the 13th consecutive year by the three New York bond rating houses, county officials announced Tuesday. The rating means the county can borrow money at the lowest available interest rates because investing in county bonds is considered to have the lowest level of risk for purchasers. Fewer than 30 jurisdictions nationwide out of about 3,000 receive the rating each year. County executive Ken Ulman, a Democrat who is planning to run for re-election this year, said the rating shows that he runs a "disciplined government that is conservative when it comes to spending and pro-active when it comes to cutting costs."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 19, 2003
Moving to raise money to pay for various county projects, the Carroll commissioners awarded $11 million in bond issues yesterday to Baltimore-based Legg Mason Wood Walker Inc. The interest rate of the 15-year issues, 3.3 percent, was the lowest among five bids received and also was the lowest for the county in recent years, county Comptroller Gene Curfman said, telling the commissioners, "The market has been going our way for a couple of days, and we...
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2002
When Harford County heads to the bond market today, it will do so with a higher rating that will save the county millions of dollars, officials said yesterday. Moody's Investors Service of New York has boosted Harford's rating from Aa2 to Aa1, one step from the top AAA rating, County Executive James M. Harkins said yesterday. "Wall Street has taken a good look at Harford County, and they like where we're going," he said. Yesterday's announcement marks the third rating upgrade since Harkins took office three years ago, said county Treasurer James M. Jewell.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2000
Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger approved county bond issues totaling a little more than $12 million four years ago that benefited a client of his private bill collection agency. The tax-exempt bonds issued by the county in late 1996 provided new, lower-cost loans for two apartment complexes run by Hendersen-Webb, the county's biggest landlord. Hendersen-Webb is the biggest client of Rupp and Associates, the collection agency owned by Ruppersberger. Records show the county-issued bonds initially carried a 4.5 percent interest rate, allowing the apartment owners to pay off a state bond that carried an interest rate of 9.5 percent, more than twice the rate on the county bonds.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2000
Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger approved county bond issues totaling a little more than $12 million four years ago that benefited a client of his private bill collection agency. The tax-exempt bonds issued by the county in late 1996 provided new, lower-cost loans for two apartment complexes run by Hendersen-Webb, the county's biggest landlord. Hendersen-Webb is the biggest client of Rupp and Associates, the collection agency owned by Ruppersberger. Records show the county-issued bonds initially carried a 4.5 percent interest rate, allowing the apartment owners to pay off a state bond that carried an interest rate of 9.5 percent, more than twice the rate on the county bonds.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | February 28, 2010
Howard County officials ceremonially broke ground on the $30 million Charles E. Miller Library and Historical Center in Ellicott City on Monday before a crowd of more than 100 people. Construction is to begin in earnest this spring, and the building is to be finished by December 2011. The long-planned, 63,000-square-foot, two-story stone, glass and metal "green" building is to rise in what is now a cornfield behind the current 23,000-square-foot library, which dates to 1962, in the 9400 block of Frederick Road.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1998
Road projects and school repairs top the list of spending priorities on the Baltimore County ballot Nov. 3, when voters are asked to approve $195 million in bond issues, along with three charter amendments.Though no individual, big-ticket items are on the ballot, the county seeks approval for bonds that will fund repairs to schools, roads, alleys, bridges and storm drains.The charter amendments include a proposal that would exempt the county executive's staff from the county's civil service merit system -- a watered-down version of a plan that would have exempted dozens of senior civil service jobs.
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