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March 17, 2007
Baltimore County Auditor Brian J. Rowe said yesterday he will resign at the end of the month after 12 years in the position. Rowe said he accepted a job from a government agency in Maryland. He also said that a dispute with county officials over a change he had sought in the calculation of employee pensions influenced his decision. "It's time to turn the page and start a new chapter in my life, seek new challenges," said Rowe, 60, who declined to name his new employer. As auditor, Rowe, a certified public accountant, oversaw a staff of 19 and worked for the County Council.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
The Baltimore County Council approved legislation Monday requiring coaches and other recreation volunteers who work with children to undergo background checks, a move officials said is meant to protect children from sexual predators. The county is the only jurisdiction in the Baltimore region that does not run background checks on volunteers for government-sponsored recreational activities. Council members passed the measure unanimously, giving county officials until July 2015 to work out details of a policy on the checks.
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NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2001
The battle over take-home patrol cars for Baltimore County police officers intensified yesterday when the county auditor responded sharply to a study by the Ruppersberger administration that some County Council members criticized as unfair and too harshly worded. Auditor Brian T. Rowe took the administration to task on several fronts, saying its analysis was unfair because it was based on a hypothetical program that included more officers than initially proposed. "It ... results in an apples-to-oranges comparison," Rowe said.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
The Anne Arundel County Council voted Tuesday to recommend that the county executive hire more police officers over the next two years. By a 5-2 vote, councilmen made a public declaration of their desire for more officers to County Executive Laura Neuman. The resolution calls for a five percent increase in officers each of the next two years. The estimated cost for next year's increase would be $4.675 million, according to the county auditor's office. The county has 679 police officers, so the new hires would amount to 34 more officers per year.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,sun reporter | March 20, 2007
Baltimore County officials are contemplating filing ethics charges against the longtime county auditor, who announced his resignation last week amid a policy dispute with the administration, an administration official said yesterday. Auditor Brian J. Rowe said the county's pension plan for former state employees, including himself, was a factor in his decision to leave. Rowe said yesterday he is prepared to sue the county over the plan, and he accused officials of trying to "smear" him. Administration officials accused Rowe of misleading the County Council in his research on a bill that would have enhanced the pensions.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | May 30, 1991
Joe Novotny is blowing in the wind.Blowing, but not breaking. The County Council's chief financial adviser learned long ago how to weather the stormy world of local politics: plant your roots deep, keepabreast of the forecast and know how to bend.Novotny has advised the seven-member council since 1965. He reviews all government expenditures -- everything from pens and pencils tonew high schools -- then recommends what the council should pay for and what it should cut.This week he presented his annual recommendations on the county executive's proposed budget for the 26th time.
NEWS
By Matthew Mosk and Laura Sullivan and Matthew Mosk and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
The president of the Anne Arundel Economic Development Corporation abruptly resigned yesterday, just as the agency is facing increasing pressure to make public a more detailed accounting of its operations.Richard J. Morgan handed his letter of resignation to County Executive Janet S. Owens during a brusque encounter at the groundbreaking for the Arundel Mills Mall -- a public event that didn't allow Owens the time or privacy to seek an explanation.For two years, Morgan has led the agency, a private corporation that receives public funds and is overseen by a board controlled by the county.
NEWS
April 10, 2008
Following a report by the Anne Arundel County auditor that questioned the purchase of Odenton land where hundreds of tons of trash was dumped, County Executive John R. Leopold yesterday announced he is ordering new environmental controls over land acquisitions and capital projects. County officials, he said, must conduct a full environmental impact review of any such projects before accepting gifts or buying or leasing land. County auditor Teresa Sutherland said in her March 24 report that county officials knew that plastic waste was strewn across property planned for a link of the Washington Baltimore & Annapolis Trail as long ago as 2002, but never conducted an environmental review of the site.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | June 20, 2009
Brenda S. Dean, a certified public accountant who had worked for Howard County government as an assistant county auditor, died of colon cancer June 8 at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. The Eldersburg resident was 66. Brenda Smith was born in Houlton, Maine, and was raised there and in Springfield, Mass. She was a graduate of Baltimore Bible College and earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland. In 1984, she earned a master's degree in accounting from Loyola College and became a certified public accountant the next year.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1999
Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens is asking county employees to report suspected fraud and corruption within her administration to a 24-hour hot line so investigators can keep county government clean.The County Council set up the toll-free telephone line two years ago. But then County Executive John G. Gary refused to send notices about the service to employees because he wanted his administration to control investigations.Under the council plan, the county's auditor, with whom Gary often fought, will investigate the complaints.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
More than 16,000 Anne Arundel County homeowners who pay for unmetered sewer service but not public water probably will see their wastewater bills drop by about one-third, after the county auditor's office said they were paying too much. "They have been overcharged because their consumption was overstated by 50 percent," county auditor Teresa Sutherland said. Those customers probably will see wastewater bills decrease by more than $160 a year, as the county agreed with a recent audit recommendation to reduce the usage estimate at the root of the audit's findings.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Michael Mershon can get pretty stirred up about lighting. He's been working in the business for more than 30 years, most of that time in Maryland, and said he's seen local governments waste millions of dollars on lighting jobs through contract practices that were sloppy, or worse. He was worked up enough early last year to file a complaint with the Howard County auditor, detailing how companies he was representing were prevented from bidding against a large lighting company for a job on a county athletic field.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
The Baltimore County Council unanimously approved Thursday the spending plan proposed by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz for the coming fiscal year, a $1.65 billion operating budget that includes no furloughs, layoffs or tax increases. The lean budget, which goes into effect in July, relies heavily on savings from retirements, attrition and reorganizations in county agencies. The county will have 7 percent fewer employees than in the previous year. The council emphasized that local government would have less to work with as employees try to deliver the same level of services.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
Baltimore County Council members are poised to adopt a lean spending plan that would achieve savings largely through early retirements and reorganizations in a number of government departments. The council made only one cut Thursday to the $1.65 billion operating budget County Executive Kevin Kamenetz recommended in April. Members trimmed the Department of Public Works' fuel budget for dump trucks and other equipment by about $208,000 because the county auditor found that the administration had overestimated the cost of fuel.
EXPLORE
February 29, 2012
From The Aegis of March 5, 1987: Harford County Sheriff Dominick Mele was seeing red 25 years ago this week after the county executive, Habern Freeman, hinted at creating a county police force, and had already gone to the extent of creating a task force to do a "comprehensive study" of all county police agencies. "We believe that it is time for us to determine whether a county police force would better fit our concept of county self-reliance and accountability," Freeman said during his annual update on Harford County.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2010
The election for an open Baltimore County Council seat in the east side's District 6 that includes Middle River, Fullerton and Overlea has, in many respects, become a referendum on the status quo and the Democratic administration that has been in place for the past eight years. Democrat Cathy A. Bevins, 51, of Middle River, was part of that administration, working for seven years in constituent service for County Executive James T. Smith Jr., and she said she would like to carry on Smith's approach.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | October 16, 1994
After learning that a county corrections officer took a prisoner's money from a cash box at the county jail and returned it two weeks later, the county auditor has urged corrections officials to change the jail's system of keeping prisoners' money.A county auditor's report on the the inmates' cash account, presented to County Council members Friday, showed that a corrections officer "was not following established policy and procedure" from Jan. 24 to Feb. 5 when he kept $150 that a prisoner's family had left at the jail.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
The county auditor has recommended that Anne Arundel County add dozens of firefighters to its Fire Department, which has been beset by a shrinking staff and skyrocketing overtime in recent years. In a report this month to Anne Arundel leaders, County Auditor Teresa Sutherland said adding 84 firefighters to the 629-member department would cost $6.7 million. But she said that once the overtime savings are subtracted, the net cost would be about $768,500. "For less than 1 million bucks to eliminate all of the fatigue and all of the morale problems ... In my opinion, it's worth it," Sutherland said yesterday.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2010
Workers are hurrying to ready the George Howard Building for its first County Council meeting in two years, but there's a lot to do before Howard government agencies can move back to the 32-year-old headquarters in Ellicott City. The County Council chamber was still without seats last week as contractors worked on wiring and other final touches for a legislative session scheduled for October — the first since October 2008. County Public Works Director James Irvin, who has worked in the building since it opened in 1978 and has been overseeing its $23.5 million renovation, said the building should be ready for occupancy by mid-September.
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