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By Rose Bennett Gilbert and Rose Bennett Gilbert,Copley News Service | December 16, 1990
Q: We have an old barn on our property that my husband (who has his own construction company) wants to move up and attach to our house as a family room. The beams are sound and have weathered to a lovely gray color. I'm just wondering what kind of furniture I should get. The rest of our house is fairly formal.A: Against such a rustic background, you can relax into a more casual mood. That could be contemporary in ambience or, more predictably, done in country style.Contemporary furniture -- soft modular seating pieces, glass tables and modern art -- can look very exciting in the kind of weathered-wood setting you describe, especially if you throw in one or two "personality" antiques: a large armoire, for example, or a wall-hung quilt.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
When Evelyn Gorman bought her then-10-year-old contemporary brick townhouse in Ruxton 25 years ago, change was the first order of business. To this seasoned interior designer from New York City, there was no reason not to create everything in her style - one she calls "country French in an eclectic, sophisticated approach. " The obvious starting point was getting rid of the 1980s kitchen that was prominently avocado green. "I have always tried to be true to my own design concepts," said the award-winning designer and former interior design columnist for the Baltimore Jewish Times.
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By RITA ST.CLAIR | March 17, 1991
Q: My apartment includes an L-shaped living and dining area that I want to refurnish. How can I give it a look that's both informal yet traditional? Please note that the dining portion of the space has no windows. Also, I'm partial to earth tones.A: It sounds as though you might enjoy a country-inspired style. Depending on just how informal you wish the space to be, the choices for furnishings can range from funky rustic to American scrubbed pine to walnut in a French country motif.In addition, it's always possible to mix a variety of informal pieces.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | August 3, 2008
We recently inherited several pieces of furniture, along with some rugs, paintings and accessories. The value of these family heirlooms is more sentimental than monetary. We would like to incorporate at least some of them into our traditionally furnished home. Can you give some advice as to how this might best be achieved? Interior designers are often consulted on ways to integrate an inherited collection of furniture and personal belongings in a home with an essentially incompatible design.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | July 3, 1994
Raymond Waites had all his ducks in a row. With such simple images as ducks, geese, bears, tulips and other sweet designs, Mr. Waites defined American country style in the early '80s and launched a multimillion-dollar business.But his success wasn't all in the design. As vice president and chief creative director for Gear Holdings Inc., a New York-based design and marketing firm, Mr. Waites pioneered the concept of licensed home furnishings. His collections gave consumers an unprecedented opportunity for one-stop shopping by making available, from more than one manufacturer, products that coordinated in color and theme.
NEWS
By Claire Whitcomb and Claire Whitcomb,Universal Press Syndicate | June 8, 2003
Here's a trip you won't want to pass up: an armchair journey to the land of the well-decorated. First stop: Catskills Country Style (Rizzoli, $50), written and photographed by Steve Gross and Sue Daley, who have spent the last 20-odd years roaming the world taking pictures for books and national decorating magazines. The Catskill Mountains and the magnificent stretch of the Hudson River they encompass are home to a number of national decorating treasures -- from Frederic Church's Moorish fantasy, Olana, to naturalist John Burroughs' humble cottage, Slabsides.
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By Michael Walsh and Michael Walsh,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | January 14, 1996
Forecasting home-fashion trends is always a dicey bit of business. So predicting that country-style decorating is about to make a run for the border amounts to little more than crawling out on a shaky limb of limited length.Still, it does seem that in the coming months and years, the United States increasingly will be looking to Mexico and points south for country-casual inspiration.This is a movement that matters, because it represents the continued evolution of country style. It gives those who have a penchant for casual decorating based on rural values and sentiments a way to update, adapt and integrate fresh, new elements and to customize and personalize their homes with new ingredients.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE GR PHOTO | April 28, 1996
We need to choose flooring and cabinets for our large kitchen. We like French country style. How do we find the appropriate components?A rustic-style floor, preferably made of planked wood or ceramic pavers, would be right for the French country design you admire. But that's pretty pricey, and you might want to consider a less expensive alternative -- something like a vinyl floor with a geometric pattern. The "Gabriel" model, from Mannington's Classic Renaissance Collection, is good enough to serve in a real French country kitchen.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | August 3, 2008
We recently inherited several pieces of furniture, along with some rugs, paintings and accessories. The value of these family heirlooms is more sentimental than monetary. We would like to incorporate at least some of them into our traditionally furnished home. Can you give some advice as to how this might best be achieved? Interior designers are often consulted on ways to integrate an inherited collection of furniture and personal belongings in a home with an essentially incompatible design.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | February 18, 2001
Denim and cowboy boots crammed the Cancun Cantina, as about 750 folks turned out for Harbor Daze Country Style -- a hoedown that raised more than $52,000 for Harbor Hospital's Women's Center. Hardcore dancers hit the floor as soon as the DJ started a new song, quickly forming lines and stepping in unison. On the tented deck, cowfolk wannabes also lined up -- at the raw bar and buffet table, or to take their turn on the karaoke stage. Things really heated up during the live auction, as surgeon Dr. Tony Raneri won an all-expense-paid trip and tickets for two to the NCAA "Final Four" basketball tournament, with his bid of $4,800.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | July 25, 2004
With Parisian panache, Pierre Deux French Country has brought the French art of living well into Americans' homes for more than 35 years. And now the New Jersey-based furniture company has created several new furnishings for lovers of 18th-century French styles. Let your guests eat cake on the new Marie Antoinette Coffee Table ($1,600), made of fine cherry with cabriole legs and accented with decorative brass. The Favenay Gold Sofa ($3,995) with matching decorative pillows, is available, as well.
NEWS
By Claire Whitcomb and Claire Whitcomb,Universal Press Syndicate | June 8, 2003
Here's a trip you won't want to pass up: an armchair journey to the land of the well-decorated. First stop: Catskills Country Style (Rizzoli, $50), written and photographed by Steve Gross and Sue Daley, who have spent the last 20-odd years roaming the world taking pictures for books and national decorating magazines. The Catskill Mountains and the magnificent stretch of the Hudson River they encompass are home to a number of national decorating treasures -- from Frederic Church's Moorish fantasy, Olana, to naturalist John Burroughs' humble cottage, Slabsides.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | February 18, 2001
Denim and cowboy boots crammed the Cancun Cantina, as about 750 folks turned out for Harbor Daze Country Style -- a hoedown that raised more than $52,000 for Harbor Hospital's Women's Center. Hardcore dancers hit the floor as soon as the DJ started a new song, quickly forming lines and stepping in unison. On the tented deck, cowfolk wannabes also lined up -- at the raw bar and buffet table, or to take their turn on the karaoke stage. Things really heated up during the live auction, as surgeon Dr. Tony Raneri won an all-expense-paid trip and tickets for two to the NCAA "Final Four" basketball tournament, with his bid of $4,800.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 1, 2000
WASHINGTON - Judge N. Sanders Sauls wrapped up yesterday's hearing in the complex lawsuit over the future of the presidency with folksy understatement. "I'm trying to stay fairly well on top of this," he drawled from his perch in a Tallahassee, Fla., courtroom. The judge is approaching extraordinary times in the most ordinary manner as he decides the vice president's lawsuit - a contest of the certified results of the Florida election that may well shape history. With his homespun observations and rustic humor, Sauls, 59, might seem to add a pinch of hayseed to the weighty proceedings.
NEWS
March 20, 2000
Making the design circuit Home computers were just the beginning. The latest design craze, according to the March/April issue of Metropolitan Home magazine, is moving the circuit board -- or the circuit board look -- from the computer to every conceivable kind of home design object. Circuit boards have taken design by storm, the magazine says. You can buy real circuit boards, rescued from outdated computers, as coasters (below). There are new lighting fixtures that reveal the wired circuitry inside.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 23, 1999
This is not an easy time for country music, and few things made that as clear as last night's broadcast of the Country Music Association awards.Five years ago, country music was seen as a real force in the pop world, an underdog finally ready to take its rightful place at the top of the charts. Somehow, though, country's conquest of the music world never quite took, and now Nashville finds itself on the outer reaches of popular music's suburbs, a place many listeners visit, but fewer and fewer want to call home.
FEATURES
By Cynthia Hanson and Cynthia Hanson,Contributing Writer | February 28, 1993
While no one was looking, "country" interiors became cosmopolitan.Open any design magazine and you'll see overstuffed sofas, painted furniture and such unlikely accessories as boulders and Oriental artifacts.Only a few years ago, the style that came to be known as country was as predictable as the "cheatin' heart" lyrics of a Hank Williams ditty.Into every house marched a platoon of decorative ducks, bunnies, cows and sheep. When these critters weren't holding interiors hostage, the culprits were gingham hearts and calico bows.
NEWS
March 20, 2000
Making the design circuit Home computers were just the beginning. The latest design craze, according to the March/April issue of Metropolitan Home magazine, is moving the circuit board -- or the circuit board look -- from the computer to every conceivable kind of home design object. Circuit boards have taken design by storm, the magazine says. You can buy real circuit boards, rescued from outdated computers, as coasters (below). There are new lighting fixtures that reveal the wired circuitry inside.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1996
That cowboy taking center stage at the American Legion post in Taneytown on Saturday will be Police Chief Melvin Diggs.Diggs is serving as master of ceremonies -- and performer -- at a dance and karaoke program, a fund-raiser for Maryland Special Olympics. The Special Olympics is a year-round sports program for children and adults with developmental disabilities."It's a fun thing, is what it is. You don't have to be a singer," Diggs said."Since we've gotten into community policing a lot, some of my officers will be there, [and]
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE GR PHOTO | April 28, 1996
We need to choose flooring and cabinets for our large kitchen. We like French country style. How do we find the appropriate components?A rustic-style floor, preferably made of planked wood or ceramic pavers, would be right for the French country design you admire. But that's pretty pricey, and you might want to consider a less expensive alternative -- something like a vinyl floor with a geometric pattern. The "Gabriel" model, from Mannington's Classic Renaissance Collection, is good enough to serve in a real French country kitchen.
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