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NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | September 22, 1994
In a time when supermarkets are getting larger and more impersonal, at least one store appears to be surviving despite bucking a trend.It probably doesn't hurt that Boarman's Old Fashioned Meat Market, selling everything from hard liquor to hog brains, is in Highland, one of the most affluent neighborhoods in the Baltimore-Washington area."
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NEWS
By Linda Burkins and For The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Step into Baron's K9 Country Store, and the official “greeters,” Louie and Drake, will welcome you. The two dogs are successors to Baron, the departed golden retriever once owned by proprietors Stacy Martin-Duffy and John Duffy. Located between the Hickory Bypass and Route 23, Baron's K9 Country Store is off the beaten path but well worth the trip. The all-natural pet products store evolved from Martin-Duffy's pet-sitting service and her interest in holistic health.  “I would see an issue with a client's dog or cat, and I'd refer them to places on the Internet for products.
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NEWS
November 27, 2003
Audrey P. Langrall, former owner of a Westminster gift shop, died of cancer Saturday at a hospital in Asheville, N.C. She was 71. Born Audrey Phillips in Baltimore and raised in Parkville, she was graduate of Towson High School and earned a bachelor's degree in English from Western Maryland College in 1953. Her marriage to Robert B. Langrall ended in divorce. During the 1960s, Mrs. Langrall was a reading specialist for Carroll County public schools. She later was office manager for Foundation Services Inc. and was a revitalization coordinator for the City of Westminster.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
You try to show journalists that some of their imagined rules and standard practices are without foundation,* and it is of no avail. Citations from dictionaries, evidence from corpus analysis, examples over decades or centuries from notable writers, and appeals to authorities on usage pass over them, leaving no impression. "I just write the way that sounds right to me," they say.  I have puzzled over this reluctance to be informed, and yesterday I recalled a story my father once told me that made everything fall into place.  After my grandfather died suddenly of a heart attack in 1945, my father, Raymond McIntyre, undertook to make a go of his general store in Elizaville Kentucky.  He told me that one week the man who drove the bread truck was apprehensive.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | August 30, 1992
The wicker baskets and clay pots and porcelain figurines are finding their places again at Ellicott's Country Store, which was damaged by arson earlier this year.Inside the historic, four-story granite-block building, owner Enalee Bounds busily puts penny candies on shelves and candlesticks into place as she readies for the store's Sept. 4 reopening.Mrs. Bounds has re-created, and in some cases redesigned, some of the showrooms that were destroyed in the fire.She has replaced the rear kitchen with an interior design office and has added stairwells to improve the flow of traffic.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1996
Lysle Neal Brandenburg, a businessman who ran several ventures, including a country grocery store in Gambrills for 11 years, died Nov. 22 of pneumonia at Genesis Health Care Center in Severna Park. He was 84.From 1945 to 1956, Mr. Brandenburg, who lived in Glen Burnie, ran Brandenburg's Country Store, a combination convenience shop, post office, hardware store, gas station and butcher shop, where customers came in for everything from pigs' feet to scrub boards to chewing tobacco to gasoline.
NEWS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,Staff writer | October 15, 1990
A bearded man walked past the pumpkins and haystacks in the window of the Annapolis Country Store, past shelves of wicker baskets and honeysuckle soaps. He greeted owner Joyce Kaminkow with a special request.His father had just turned 80. He was looking for a man's comb and brush set, something unique, something his father would use every day.Kaminkow was out of the style he wanted. Not to worry, though. She suggested a razor instead. The customer, a longtime friend, liked the idea.He chatted briefly with Kaminkow in her country gift store before leaving with his purchase.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2001
Mildred Jarvis Shockley, who ran a country store and helped re-establish an Eastern Shore church, died Sunday of complications of gall bladder surgery at Berlin Nursing Home. The Berlin resident was 87. With her husband, Olin Shockley Sr., and later her son, William Shockley of Berlin, she owned and operated Shockley's Market on Stephen Decatur Highway in Berlin from 1951 until 1991, when she sold it and retired. The white clapboard store with its "liar's bench" out front was a favorite gathering spot for farmers, workers and others who came to enjoy a sandwich and a soda while relating local happenings.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1997
Roland E. Feeser, born in his father's Pleasant Valley market on New Year's Eve in 1920, has run his country store just north of Westminster for decades.Hand-lettered signs on the door of Feeser's Fruit Market announce: "We Now Have Mincemeat" and "Fresh Dipped Oysters" on bright green and orange cardboard.Among them is a less colorful but more startling sign: "For Sale or Rent."Feeser, 76, said he reluctantly decided this month to sell his business in the 800 block of Littlestown Pike (Route 97)
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | September 14, 1992
WHITE HOUSE -- Sherman Sparks doesn't work so hard any more -- only 11 hours a day instead of 17.But when you're 88 and have tended the same crossroads country store for 71 years, you've earned the right to take it easy."
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2004
TODD'S POINT - The potted geraniums on top of the gas pumps out front are the first tip-off: Things are not quite as they used to be. Boxes of 12-gauge shotgun shells now sit on an antique sewing machine. Then, there are the Friday night wine-tasting events that draw 50 or 60 curious patrons. On weekends, that's sushi in the meat case at John Lewis' Grocery. The old country store remains at the heart of Dorchester County's marshy Neck District. The shelves at this cultural and literal crossroads for nearly 130 years are always stocked with familiar staples.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2004
A general store near the Northern Central Railroad Trail in Parkton was destroyed in an early-morning fire yesterday, a month after it was opened by a Pennsylvania chef who said he lost his last business in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Isabel. The fire at the Little Gunpowder Falls General Store and Delicatessen started about 2:40 a.m. in the two-story, wood-frame building. The flames also burned telephone wires, leaving as many as 3,000 northern Baltimore County residents without telephone service for much of the day. Deli owner Jerry Herbert spent yesterday surveying the charred remains of his business.
NEWS
November 27, 2003
Audrey P. Langrall, former owner of a Westminster gift shop, died of cancer Saturday at a hospital in Asheville, N.C. She was 71. Born Audrey Phillips in Baltimore and raised in Parkville, she was graduate of Towson High School and earned a bachelor's degree in English from Western Maryland College in 1953. Her marriage to Robert B. Langrall ended in divorce. During the 1960s, Mrs. Langrall was a reading specialist for Carroll County public schools. She later was office manager for Foundation Services Inc. and was a revitalization coordinator for the City of Westminster.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2002
Much has changed on Ellicott City's Main Street since the early 1960s. But it's hard to imagine what it would be like today if Ellicott's Country Store and its owner, Enalee E. Bounds, had not remained. Now, as her antiques and home furnishings shop enters its 41th year, Bounds is just as involved as ever in preserving the town and its historic places. "She is kind of the patron saint of the neighborhood," said Janet Kusterer, president of Historic Ellicott City Inc., which Bounds helped found.
BUSINESS
By Amelia Cleary and Amelia Cleary,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 2002
I was driving on Route 165 looking for Pylesville, in northern Harford County, and couldn't find it. So, I pulled over to ask how to get to the town. Lora Ohearn hopped out of her red pickup truck in front of the defunct Barnacle Bill's Restaurant and Grill, which has been closed for years, and said, "You're in it." I looked around for evidence of life and saw a few houses in the distance beyond the cornfields. The town starts on Route 165 up the road where the lights are flashing and ends farther up the road in the other direction a little ways, said Ohearn, who has lived in Pylesville for 10 years because she loves the country.
NEWS
By Sue du Pont and Sue du Pont,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 16, 2001
MUST BE that the long days and warm summer weather are getting to me, or maybe it's the coverage of the Tour de France inspiring me. It might also have been the arrival in the mail of the registration brochure for the sixth Bay Country Century bicycle ride set for Sept. 1. Whatever the reasons, I dusted off my bike not long ago, remembering how much fun I used to have riding around South County roads after work three or four times a week. A job with longer hours and commute curtailed my after-work rides a few years ago. Now with a nearby job, I've ventured out again.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2004
TODD'S POINT - The potted geraniums on top of the gas pumps out front are the first tip-off: Things are not quite as they used to be. Boxes of 12-gauge shotgun shells now sit on an antique sewing machine. Then, there are the Friday night wine-tasting events that draw 50 or 60 curious patrons. On weekends, that's sushi in the meat case at John Lewis' Grocery. The old country store remains at the heart of Dorchester County's marshy Neck District. The shelves at this cultural and literal crossroads for nearly 130 years are always stocked with familiar staples.
FEATURES
April 17, 1994
The Crafts Guild of St. Mary's County will sponsor its ninth annual Wool and Colonial Craft Festival April 24 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Christmas Country Store in Great Mills.The festival features crafts made with natural fibers. The Chesapeake Spinners & Weavers will offer demonstrations; there will also be demonstrations of blacksmithing, candle wicking, basket and cloth weaving, quilting, bobbin lace making, corn-husk doll making and European egg decorating.A storyteller will perform at noon and 1 p.m., and there will be goats and rabbits for children to pet. Complimentary refreshments will be served, and herbs, plants and baked goods will be for sale.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2001
Mildred Jarvis Shockley, who ran a country store and helped re-establish an Eastern Shore church, died Sunday of complications of gall bladder surgery at Berlin Nursing Home. The Berlin resident was 87. With her husband, Olin Shockley Sr., and later her son, William Shockley of Berlin, she owned and operated Shockley's Market on Stephen Decatur Highway in Berlin from 1951 until 1991, when she sold it and retired. The white clapboard store with its "liar's bench" out front was a favorite gathering spot for farmers, workers and others who came to enjoy a sandwich and a soda while relating local happenings.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2001
When a Giant Food store opened in Clarksville two years ago, Elizabeth Connolly had a sinking feeling. "My stomach flipped," she said of her first glimpse of the large, new grocery store. "I thought, `How are we going to compete with this?' " Sixty thousand square feet of canned goods, produce and baked goods in a brightly lighted supermarket with wide aisles - all of this seemed too much like a real-life giant that would dwarf the small, 70-year-old grocery store her grandfather founded.
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