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By Mary Jo Tarallo | January 13, 1991
Next time a ferocious snowstorm dumps on the Baltimore region, why not make the best of it? Get out there and sample a winter sport that is fun, invigorating and guaranteed to help improve one's fitness.Try cross country skiing.There are more than 6.5 million cross country skiers in the United States. According to Gene Hagerman, sports medicine coordinator for the United States Ski Team, cross country skiing is one of the best forms of exercise. It works combinations of large and small muscle groups, including the arm and back, quadriceps, hamstrings and ankles, he says.
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By Marshall S. Berdan and Marshall S. Berdan,Special to the Sun | November 12, 2006
If charm is what counts most, Stowe, Vt., is New England's premier ski town. Towering over the 200-year-old village is the 171-foot steeple of the white clapboard Community Church built in 1863. A covered bridge spans the local stream, leading up to a coaching inn that dates to the 1830s. Genteelly spaced along Main Street are old country stores and quaint new boutiques and galleries, interspersed with an abundance of mature sugar maples. Completing this quintessential New England scene is the picture postcard backdrop of 4,393-foot Mount Mansfield, Vermont's highest peak, looming in the distance.
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SPORTS
February 23, 1992
MenFourBjorn Dahlie, Norway, cross country skiing, 3 gold, 1 silver.NB Vegard Ulvang, Norway, cross country skiing, 3 gold, 1 silver.WomenFiveLyubov Egorova, Unified Team, cross country skiing, 3 gold, 2 silver.Elena Valbe, Unified Team, cross country skiing, 1 gold, 4 bronze.
SPORTS
By DAVID WHARTON and DAVID WHARTON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 27, 2006
PRAGELATO PLAN, Italy -- For a nation that at times seemed lukewarm about hosting the Winter Olympics, the final day of the sports extravaganza brought a nice parting gift. A shot of adrenaline. The jolt came from a boisterous crowd that lined the cross-country skiing course yesterday morning, and from Giorgio di Centa, who gave them something to cheer about at the end. The Italian stayed with the lead pack for the better part of two hours, then sprinted away in the final few hundred meters to win the men's 50-kilometer race.
SPORTS
February 21, 1992
On TV7-9 a.m.: Cross country skiing (women's 30 kilometers), speed skiing (semifinals, live), figure skating (preview of women's long program).11 a.m.-conclusion: .9,9.5 Ice hockey (U.S. vs. Unified Team).8-11 p.m.: Figure skating (women's long program), ice hockey (semifinal highlights), bobsled (four-man, heats Nos. 1 and 2.)11:30 p.m.-midnight: Highlights.Coverage: Channels 11, 9 1-6 p.m.: Ice hockey (Canada vs. Czechoslovakia semifinal), four-man bobsled, cross country skiing, speed skiing, figure skating.
SPORTS
February 1, 1998
Friday -- 6A 2,000-person choir and several sumo wrestlers -- which weighs more? -- will help the Games get under way with the opening ceremonies and lighting of the Olympic flame. No Muhammad Ali this time around, though.TV highlightsCBS8-11 p.m.Opening ceremonies.Saturday -- 7American Tommy Moe will try to stun the world again in the men's downhill competition as he did at Lillehammer in 1994. But this year's event could result in the first gold by a name you may see often at these Games: Hermann Maier of Austria.
SPORTS
January 9, 2006
ABOUT THE GAMES What -- 2006 Winter Olympics When -- Feb. 10-26 Where -- Turin, Italy Sports -- Alpine skiing, biathlon, bobsled, cross country skiing, curling, figure skating, freestyle skiing, ice hockey, luge, nordic combined, short track, skeleton, ski jumping, snowboard, speed skating. Web site -- www.torino2006.org Quotable -- "I don't ever talk to anybody of that magnitude. I don't want to bother him. We'll see after the Olympics. I'm sure we'll cross paths after I do what I'm about to do."
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | February 17, 1994
LILLEHAMMER, Norway -- Understand, Paul Hannes actually chose to camp out in the woods for a week in 20-below temperatures."I saved up vacation time for this," he said yesterday as happily as a senator on a boondoggle trip to the Caribbean.I was trapped. I had to ask him the question. There was just no way around it."Why are you doing this?" I asked the engineer from outside Oslo. "Tell me, please."A burly, fortyish man with wire-rim glasses, a precise manner and the customary apple-red cheeks, he looked at me as though it was the most ridiculous question ever posed.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 14, 1998
HAKUBA, Japan -- They live on the same street in the same town of Nannestad, Norway. They train and compete together. They are part of a cross country skiing culture in which the elder passes on his experience to the younger.But on a dank morning in Japan, they were skiing rivals at the Winter Olympics.Bjorn Daehlie and Thomas Alsgaard together streaked out of a fog-shrouded forest and into a final straight in the men's 15-kilometer cross country ski race yesterday. The crowd that hovered under golf umbrellas while standing on banks of melting black snow, roared.
SPORTS
February 11, 1992
The Winter Olympics have a premiere today.For the first time, women will compete for medals in the biathlon, a sport that combines the endurance of cross country skiing with marksmanship from a shooting range.The competition begins with the 7.4-kilometer event at Les Saisies, and it will be a tough course. In addition to the high altitude of 5,248 meters, the course features an uphill section just before the shooting range."There is little time for recovery," said U.S. biathlete Nancy Bell of Stowe, Vt.Women have been competing in world biathlon championships for eight years, but the decision wasn't made to add the event to the Games until the spring of 1988.
SPORTS
January 9, 2006
ABOUT THE GAMES What -- 2006 Winter Olympics When -- Feb. 10-26 Where -- Turin, Italy Sports -- Alpine skiing, biathlon, bobsled, cross country skiing, curling, figure skating, freestyle skiing, ice hockey, luge, nordic combined, short track, skeleton, ski jumping, snowboard, speed skating. Web site -- www.torino2006.org Quotable -- "I don't ever talk to anybody of that magnitude. I don't want to bother him. We'll see after the Olympics. I'm sure we'll cross paths after I do what I'm about to do."
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | November 29, 1998
ASHCROFT, Colo. - The big noise here is the wind in Castle Creek Valley, nothing more. The chief activity consists of occasional gusts of snow, skimming along the creek edge like running ground fog. Look way down the valley and chances are you won't see another soul. Stop if you like and take in the jagged mountaintops in the distance playing peek-a-boo with winter sun and clouds. Or shuffle on at your own pace. This, too, is skiing.True, it's not the sort of thing pictured on the Aspen travel posters, trending as they do toward images of skiers hurtling down slopes at acute angles, powder exploding, poles flying like javelins in a moment of exhilarating speed.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 14, 1998
HAKUBA, Japan -- They live on the same street in the same town of Nannestad, Norway. They train and compete together. They are part of a cross country skiing culture in which the elder passes on his experience to the younger.But on a dank morning in Japan, they were skiing rivals at the Winter Olympics.Bjorn Daehlie and Thomas Alsgaard together streaked out of a fog-shrouded forest and into a final straight in the men's 15-kilometer cross country ski race yesterday. The crowd that hovered under golf umbrellas while standing on banks of melting black snow, roared.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 2, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- In Europe, he's a star. Back home in Steamboat Springs, Colo., he's lucky to be recognized at his local Subway shop.But Todd Lodwick doesn't seem to mind. This unassuming 21-year-old isn't after fame and fortune. He's only after one of the big prizes at the Winter Olympics -- trying to become the first American to claim a medal in the Nordic combined.And Lodwick's medal hope isn't some sort of pipe dream. He's a big player on the international circuit, with two career World Cup victories and a world junior title on his resume.
SPORTS
February 1, 1998
Friday -- 6A 2,000-person choir and several sumo wrestlers -- which weighs more? -- will help the Games get under way with the opening ceremonies and lighting of the Olympic flame. No Muhammad Ali this time around, though.TV highlightsCBS8-11 p.m.Opening ceremonies.Saturday -- 7American Tommy Moe will try to stun the world again in the men's downhill competition as he did at Lillehammer in 1994. But this year's event could result in the first gold by a name you may see often at these Games: Hermann Maier of Austria.
FEATURES
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1997
On a rainy winter afternoon in Baltimore, we boarded a train bound for the white-capped Green Mountains, pressing our way through aisles crowded and noisy with weekend travelers.I grumbled, irritated that the crowds had forced my family to scatter among single empty seats instead of sitting together on this long-planned trip to Stowe, Vt., a many-hour excursion by one of Amtrak's daily ski trains.This would be a long trip. Perhaps we should have traveled by van. But driving far north, even in early winter, didn't sound appealing.
SPORTS
By Michael Reeb and Michael Reeb,Staff Writer | February 18, 1992
In a perfect world, Marianne Jensen would be skiing more and running less, but the winters being not what they were, she is running more and skiing less.Cross country skiing is her passion, and before pursuing a master's degree at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health brought her from her native Norway to Baltimore, she could spend more time skiing.In Baltimore, Jensen, 29, has become more involved in the running community. In the past year, she has won the St. Paul's Crusade 5K, the Cross Country 10K at Catonsville Community College, the Tom Krieger Memorial Run and the Baltimore Road Runners Club's Frozen Finger 5-Miler and is seldom out of the top five in any race.
FEATURES
By Kathryn Straach and Kathryn Straach,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | July 21, 1996
Stroll through the homey lobby of the Izaak Walton Inn, with its knotty-pine walls and ceiling, huge stone fireplace and Montana-made furniture. Drink in its soothing scenery and its friendly people.Now here's a Montana hideaway where you could really hunker down.And many people do.The Izaak Walton Inn, in Essex, attracts a mix of train buffs, cross-country skiers, fishermen, hikers, mountain bikers, nature lovers, outdoor enthusiasts and families.The three-story lodge, bordering Glacier National Park and the Bob Marshall and Great Bear wildernesses in northwest Montana, was built in 1939 for the crews who serviced the Great Northern Railway.
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