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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | October 22, 1998
American city and country life from the 1920s through World War II is the subject of the current exhibit of 50 prints at the Mitchell Gallery of St. John's College in Annapolis.The exhibit's Urban Realists include Reginald Marsh, Isabel Bishop and Martin Lewis, and New York is their primary focus. American regionalists such as Thomas Hart Benton, Grant Wood and John Steuart Curry depict rural life. The show, called "American Prints 1925-1945," is taken from the Syracuse University Art Collection.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Deep in the Hereford Zone of northern Baltimore County, narrow country roads slice through fields of waist-high corn, surprisingly tall for early summer. A lane running adjacent to a Christmas tree farm passes a few old barns; farther down the lane, there is a large, two-story wagon house in need of repair, another red barn, a chicken shed and a stable in the distance. Just beyond the shed and a vegetable garden sits the long and narrow farmhouse of Betsy and Charley Mitchell on 8 acres of what was formerly a nearly 500-acre tenant farm.
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SPORTS
By Dale Austin | September 16, 1990
It was a special time at Country Life Farm last week. Phones were ringing with people calling to make inquiries about breeding to Allen's Prospect, the newest hero of Maryland breeding.It's not been this heady at Country Life since 1961, when sires from that farm accounted for the entire Triple Crown. That year, Carry Back won the Kentucky Derby and Preakness. He was a son of Saggy, from Country Life.Sherluck, who scored a big upset in the Belmont Stakes, was a son of Country Life stallion Correspondent.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | May 17, 2012
As many eyes in the sports world focus on Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore Saturday for the 139th running of the Preakness Stakes, it's comforting to know Harford County still has a place in horse racing. Bel Air's Country Life Farm, as Dewey Fox reminded our readers with his fine piece about the Pons family's operation in The Aegis Wednesday, is carrying on the horse breeding tradition that spans the past eight decades or so, helped out of late by the farm's part ownership of Malibu Moon, one of the top stallions in the country, who started his stud career at Country Life and now stands in Kentucky.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | August 18, 1995
"Country Life" is Vanya not on 42nd street but on the 42nd parallel -- that is to say, it's Chekhov's "Uncle Vanya" picked up and deposited with loving respect not in a crumbling Gotham movie palace but in rural Australia, circa 1919.Michael Blakemore's film is a good deal less radical than the Andre Gregory-Louis Malle "Vanya on 42nd Street" of last year. Gregory staged the authentic Vanya without costumes or makeup or even a stage, almost as an homage to the transcendent power of performance and Chekhov's words.
NEWS
By Judy Reilly and Judy Reilly,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 1996
IT'S A SCENE from the Peaceable Kingdom -- domestic animals in all shapes, sizes and breeds saunter in and out of the animal doors created for them. One barn on the property houses sheep and a cow, another a potter's studio. Sun streams into the window of the farmhouse kitchen, where Bonnie Buellis sits chatting about country life, art and people.Ms. Buellis is one of those rare individuals many of us would like to emulate -- independent, free-spirited, energetic, an animal lover and artist who lives on the farm where she grew up. She treasures the country life -- "It's a slice of heaven here," she says.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2003
They buried the remains of Allen's Prospect outside his stall at the Pons family's Country Life Farm near Bel Air. A purple mum was planted in the freshly turned earth. A marker commemorating the 21-year-old stallion will be erected this fall. "He was a genuine Maryland star," said Tom Bowman, president of the Maryland Horse Breeders Association. "He was remarkably fertile and remarkably consistent for a very long time. The Ponses will find another horse to fill his stall, but they won't replace Allen's Prospect."
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | October 13, 2005
Joseph P. Pons Sr., patriarch of the family that owns Maryland's oldest extant commercial thoroughbred breeding farm, died of a heart attack yesterday morning at his Bel Air home. He was 83. Mr. Pons resided at Country Life Farm with his wife and four of their five children. Racing's all-time money winner, Cigar, was born at the farm, and 1961 Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner Carry Back was bred there. "It just won't be the same, walking out in the paddock and not seeing Joe," said William "Billy" Boniface of Bonita Farm.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | December 19, 1992
Carnirainbow seeks her sixth 1992 stakes victory today in the $50,000-added Cameo Stakes at Laurel Race Course.But a rematch with Broad Gains, who beat her in the Maryland Juvenile Championship about a month ago, will not take place.Trainer Dick Small said yesterday he has sent Broad Gains to his Pacoma Farm in Camden, S.C., for the winter along with other such stable stars as Star Minister and Valley Crossing.The plan, Small said, is to bring Broad Gains back to Maryland when the Hayward Avenue side of Pimlico Race Course opens in the spring.
NEWS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,SUN SPORTS COLUMNIST | October 22, 1995
BEL AIR -- Long before his celestial talent bloomed this year, the thoroughbred named Cigar stood out among the thousands of horses that have come and gone over the years at Country Life Farm in Harford County."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
After six months off to recover from the wear and tear of a North American record 22 straight victories, Rapid Redux will be retired next week to Kentucky Horse Park, his owner Robert Cole and trainer David Wells said. "He's perfect right now and we want him to stay that way," said Cole, a Towson native. "Why risk having him get beat. " Located outside of Lexington, Kentucky Horse Park is home to many famous horses, including Cigar, Da Horse and Funny Cide. John Henry, who was a resident, is buried there.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 13, 2009
Attorney and arts activist Donald Rothman, who died this week, spent hours in the courtroom, but no case swallowed more of his time than a decade-long lawsuit surrounding a race horse named Saggy. This legal drama had more turns than a racetrack's oval contours. Rothman was the attorney for Baltimore clothing manufacturer Stanley Sagner, who was a highly successful maker of Northcool men's suits. Sagner was a lucky man - he escaped death during the 1956 sinking of the liner Andrea Doria off Nantucket, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JESSICA BERTHOLD | May 4, 2006
The photoblog A Walk Through Durham Township, Pennsylvania (durhamtownship.com) is a visual valentine to scenic southeastern Pennsylvania. An ever-expanding collection of landscape and slice-of-life photos, the blog lovingly documents rural life, from farmers framed by freshly plowed fields to rolling hills dotted with silos. Many of the shots are simple collages of clouds, earth, sky and an object (a tree, a tractor, a person) whose solitude renders it remarkable. The composition and coloring of the images are quietly, and consistently, stunning in their artistry.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | October 13, 2005
Joseph P. Pons Sr., patriarch of the family that owns Maryland's oldest extant commercial thoroughbred breeding farm, died of a heart attack yesterday morning at his Bel Air home. He was 83. Mr. Pons resided at Country Life Farm with his wife and four of their five children. Racing's all-time money winner, Cigar, was born at the farm, and 1961 Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner Carry Back was bred there. "It just won't be the same, walking out in the paddock and not seeing Joe," said William "Billy" Boniface of Bonita Farm.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2005
Sixty years after it first opened its gates, the Howard County Fair proved to be a popular summer tradition, drawing an estimated 70,000 visitors to the West Friendship fairgrounds Aug. 6 through Saturday. As always, weather was the key factor in ticket sales during the fair's eight-day run, said Vaughn Turner, president of the fair board. Heat and humidity were particularly unpleasant Friday and Saturday, contributing to a drop-off from last year's estimated 80,000 to 90,000 attendees.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 2004
Four years ago, Anita Gold followed a long-cherished dream to live in the country. She sold a rowhouse in Baltimore and moved to green acres in Carroll County. Gold, 59, remembers the day she and husband Mike Hall, 60, happened upon a 25-year-old split-level home in Finksburg situated on a half-acre "in the middle of a farm, with cows across the street." "This house was in absolute move-in condition," Gold states, "at a cost of $169,000." Once the deal was signed, the couple set about grading an unsightly hill on the expansive front lawn.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | August 14, 1994
The country life can be comforting -- clear pasture vistas, th smell of grass, friendly creatures romping about. The scenes chase away the pressures and cares of the urban world.Clothes for the country life are designed to move through a day that may start with a dawn ride and end with a sundowner at the local pub.No wonder then, that rugged twills, tweeds and denims have become fashion's wardrobe staples; they move confidently through executive suites and dusty barns.Some men arrange to live much of their lives outdoors -- whether by career choice or avocation -- and these clothes suit them fine.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2003
Allen's Prospect, sire of 14 Maryland Million winners and other thoroughbreds that have won nearly $39 million, was euthanized in Pennsylvania Wednesday after surgery for a tumor under his jaw. The death of the stallion, 21, is producing a flood of sympathetic e-mails and phone calls to Country Life Farm near Bel Air, where Allen's Prospect stood for 17 years. His runners won 200 or more races every year from 1994 through 2002. They topped the $3 million mark in earnings in 1996 to 1999 and then $4 million from 2000 to 2002, bringing career earnings close to $39 million.
BUSINESS
By Rebecca Boreczky and Rebecca Boreczky,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 9, 2003
Jayme Marshall and Myles Doherty love living between the cornfields of Frederick County and the mountains of West Virginia. Their home, more than 200 years old, sits along Main Street in Burkittsville. The town has 192 residents and is a country oasis for several Washington commuters, including Marshall and Doherty. The couple moved here six years ago, purchasing the Federal-style home for $177,000. Two years of renovations have cost them about $50,000. The 2,800-square-foot house is decorated with an eclectic mix of antiques and modern furniture.
BUSINESS
By James Gallo and James Gallo,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 2003
Amid the sprawling cornfields of Harford County, new and larger homes continue to speckle the once-rural landscape. It is becoming particularly evident in the small crossroads community of Forest Hill, just north of Bel Air. More homes than ever are under construction as new residents join longtime ones in seeking less-congested surroundings. "I love the town because it's cozy," said Audrey Warfield, 70, who has lived her entire life in Forest Hill. "People here aren't pushy and not constantly at your doorstep, but they're also always there when you need them."
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