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By ROSEMARY KNOWER | May 14, 1995
Some houses seem never to have been new. This one, built in the Palladian style and situated overlooking a wooded ravine in suburban Maryland, is just such a dwelling. The portico is flanked by tall windows on one side; on the other, a secret garden beckons through a wrought-iron gate arched by towering hollies. The entrance is formal, but not at all forbidding.On viewing the house, one suddenly feels transported through time and space to a country house somewhere in England on a summer weekend between the two world wars.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2013
Here's a cool example of what-goes-around-comes-around: In 1965, a British -made thriller called "Die! Die! My Darling!" hit the movie houses. This study in strangeness and sadism starred the indelibly foggy-voiced, deliciously irreverent Tallulah Bankhead in her last film. She plays Mrs. Trefoile, a religious fanatic who keeps a tight rein on her country house and her suspiciously loyal servants. Obsessed with the recent death of her son, Mrs. Trefoile is only too happy to welcome as a guest her son's former fiancee, the decidedly worldly Patricia Carroll.
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TRAVEL
By Gerri Kobren and Gerri Kobren,Special to the Sun | July 25, 1999
Just east of Charlottesville, Va., in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Keswick Hall at Monticello stands as a testament to the power of fantasy.From the outside, it's a villa in Tuscany. Indoors, it is something else again -- a 48-room luxury hotel decked out in Laura Ashley fabrics and an eclectic collection of antiques, offering a lifestyle experience most often associated with the rich and famous.For $330 -- the price for a room with unlimited one-day golfing for one -- we get breakfast free, so Keswick could be defined as a B&B. But this is no just-folks kind of place.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | January 13, 2008
Whether through skylights or multi-paned windows, sunlight streams into this Monkton home. Nearly every window has a view of Baltimore County's hunt country, and the Elkridge Harford Hunt Club events run through or behind the property every fall. The house and its setting offer a respite from the city. Yet, "it's definitely a home, it's not an estate," said owner Susan Boone. "We use every single room," she said. That includes a two-bathroom master suite, an office with a semicircle of window seats, an expansive dining room with deep molding and a kitchen-family room area where all parties seem to hover.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and By Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2003
If you never made it to the Polka-Dotted Zebra, that quirky little store in Cockeysville, don't fret. Owner Jill Bosse has just moved her artsy store to a much larger space in Towson. The old place was basically "a shoe box with things stuffed in it," she said. The new space has a front section filled with funky items, such as mosaics, painted brooms and mailboxes, and a large back section set up like an art gallery. The store features unique collectibles -- some acquired, some created by Bosse and other artists.
FEATURES
By Jill L. Kubatko | April 19, 1992
In the eye of the beholderThe word "home" means different things to different people, a point most clearly illustrated in a new exhibit that opens this week at Maryland Art Place, 218 W. Saratoga St.The exhibition is an appreciation of the meaning of home through both abstract and realistic expressions.Pam Thompson and Margaretha Bull tracked the concept of homeland from the perspective of North American indigenous culture. Craig Pleasants used homelessness as his topic. Luis Flores explored the perspective of Salvadoran refugees in the United States, and George Chang created the ideal dream house.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | April 24, 2006
MOSCOW -- A dacha -- the Russian country house, the quintessential weekend escape -- can be as modest as a wooden shack without heat or running water, or as lavish as a villa with meticulously landscaped grounds. Now, introducing another kind of country house: a dacha on wheels. The so-called Autodacha -- a camper made in neighboring Belarus that sleeps five and can deliver you far beyond your country estate -- is rolling through the Russian countryside this spring, alongside larger, more luxurious motor homes that dealers hope will become the next big thing in Russian leisure.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | January 5, 2003
A Memorable Place Years later, Bonaire still feels like home By Lauren Magnuson SPECIAL TO THE SUN It has been said that you can never go home again. The fear of returning to a former home and finding things radically changed caused me to put off a long-promised trip back to the island of Bonaire, where I had lived for 12 years and had given birth to my three children. When we left the island in 1994, I promised the children that one day we would return. But the years passed, and soon the children, now adolescents, would be leaving home for their own journeys.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2013
Here's a cool example of what-goes-around-comes-around: In 1965, a British -made thriller called "Die! Die! My Darling!" hit the movie houses. This study in strangeness and sadism starred the indelibly foggy-voiced, deliciously irreverent Tallulah Bankhead in her last film. She plays Mrs. Trefoile, a religious fanatic who keeps a tight rein on her country house and her suspiciously loyal servants. Obsessed with the recent death of her son, Mrs. Trefoile is only too happy to welcome as a guest her son's former fiancee, the decidedly worldly Patricia Carroll.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | June 9, 1996
The back of my pine chair is round, and when the back is flipped forward, the chair turns into a table. When was it made?Table chairs were introduced in the 17th century. They also were made in the 18th and 19th centuries for use in country houses. They sell for $1,200 to $7,500.My grandparents were from Turkey. When they died, they left me an old doll with a wooden face. It's a man dressed in a native Turkish costume. I think he's made from papier-mache. He is marked "Ertugrul O Zsoy Turk El Isleri Ataturk Bulwari."
NEWS
By SHEILA YOUNG and SHEILA YOUNG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 2006
Sometimes all the ingredients are there for a magnificent dish, but they don't add up to magic for some reason. And sometimes all the ingredients are there for a superb restaurant - and yet missing the magic, it is less than what it could be. Such was a recent visit to the Kings Contrivance. Kings Contrivance could be the premier restaurant in the region. In an area where land is hard to find and even harder to pay for, it has plenty. Its country-house setting feels miles away from the nearest neighbor, setting a gracious mood without making guests drive for hours.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | April 24, 2006
MOSCOW -- A dacha -- the Russian country house, the quintessential weekend escape -- can be as modest as a wooden shack without heat or running water, or as lavish as a villa with meticulously landscaped grounds. Now, introducing another kind of country house: a dacha on wheels. The so-called Autodacha -- a camper made in neighboring Belarus that sleeps five and can deliver you far beyond your country estate -- is rolling through the Russian countryside this spring, alongside larger, more luxurious motor homes that dealers hope will become the next big thing in Russian leisure.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and By Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2003
If you never made it to the Polka-Dotted Zebra, that quirky little store in Cockeysville, don't fret. Owner Jill Bosse has just moved her artsy store to a much larger space in Towson. The old place was basically "a shoe box with things stuffed in it," she said. The new space has a front section filled with funky items, such as mosaics, painted brooms and mailboxes, and a large back section set up like an art gallery. The store features unique collectibles -- some acquired, some created by Bosse and other artists.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | January 5, 2003
A Memorable Place Years later, Bonaire still feels like home By Lauren Magnuson SPECIAL TO THE SUN It has been said that you can never go home again. The fear of returning to a former home and finding things radically changed caused me to put off a long-promised trip back to the island of Bonaire, where I had lived for 12 years and had given birth to my three children. When we left the island in 1994, I promised the children that one day we would return. But the years passed, and soon the children, now adolescents, would be leaving home for their own journeys.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 2002
You might feel as if you're walking into your grandmother's house as you enter the one-story, white clapboard building. There is a casual, country feel to the Country Kettle Cafe in Poplar Springs, but the food is anything but ordinary. Owners and chefs Jim and Amy Crooks opened their cozy western Howard County restaurant a little more than a year ago after spending years looking for the right location. They have years of cooking experience at restaurants in Montgomery County, where they grew up. The couple had dreamed of owning a restaurant for some time.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2001
From Texas to North Carolina to California, many former residents of blighted public housing projects are discovering they may not be welcome when their old homes are replaced by bright new developments. By design, the crowded, crime-ridden high-rises are being replaced in most cases by garden-style apartments that house only a fraction of the original residents. It is all part of HOPE VI, a program administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The highly praised program, created nearly a decade ago, has been credited with giving new life to cities and public housing.
NEWS
By SHEILA YOUNG and SHEILA YOUNG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 2006
Sometimes all the ingredients are there for a magnificent dish, but they don't add up to magic for some reason. And sometimes all the ingredients are there for a superb restaurant - and yet missing the magic, it is less than what it could be. Such was a recent visit to the Kings Contrivance. Kings Contrivance could be the premier restaurant in the region. In an area where land is hard to find and even harder to pay for, it has plenty. Its country-house setting feels miles away from the nearest neighbor, setting a gracious mood without making guests drive for hours.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 2002
You might feel as if you're walking into your grandmother's house as you enter the one-story, white clapboard building. There is a casual, country feel to the Country Kettle Cafe in Poplar Springs, but the food is anything but ordinary. Owners and chefs Jim and Amy Crooks opened their cozy western Howard County restaurant a little more than a year ago after spending years looking for the right location. They have years of cooking experience at restaurants in Montgomery County, where they grew up. The couple had dreamed of owning a restaurant for some time.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2001
Through three centuries, Doughoregan Manor has stood watch over its domain, a sprawling estate so mysterious that some Howard County neighbors don't know it exists - and so valuable that developers can't stop thinking about it. Now, its clock is ticking down. About 275 years old, with 20 rooms, a private chapel and a long, tree-lined drive, the country home of founding father Charles Carroll is Maryland's answer to Mount Vernon and Monticello. And it has something neither of those landmarks can claim - it is the only home of a Declaration of Independence signer still in family hands.
TRAVEL
By Gerri Kobren and Gerri Kobren,Special to the Sun | July 25, 1999
Just east of Charlottesville, Va., in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Keswick Hall at Monticello stands as a testament to the power of fantasy.From the outside, it's a villa in Tuscany. Indoors, it is something else again -- a 48-room luxury hotel decked out in Laura Ashley fabrics and an eclectic collection of antiques, offering a lifestyle experience most often associated with the rich and famous.For $330 -- the price for a room with unlimited one-day golfing for one -- we get breakfast free, so Keswick could be defined as a B&B. But this is no just-folks kind of place.
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