Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCountry Home
IN THE NEWS

Country Home

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
For anyone who has ever longed for the charm of an English-inspired country home within Baltimore City, 38 Warrenton Road in Guilford just might be the perfect cup of tea. Built in 1924, this three-story stone and stucco home, embellished with gables and dormers, is open for viewing and priced at $825,000. "All of the houses on this part of the street are good, medium-sized Guilford homes; not overwhelming, not mansions," said listing agent Frank Locke of Chase, Fitzgerald & Co. With a 3,830-square-foot living space, the home has six bedrooms, three full bathrooms and one half-bathroom.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 4, 2014
An article in the June 6, 1914 edition of The Argus remarked on a Catonsville resident's birthday celebration. " Elias Livezey , Catonsville's oldest living resident, Wednesday observed his ninety-fifth birthday at Elkton Park, his home on Ingleside avenue, by entertaining the members of his family. Mr. Livezey, who is the father-in-law of Bernard N. Baker , the well-known financier, is quite active considering his age, and daily visits his city office 22 East Lexington Street, which he has occupied for more than 60 years.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 4, 2014
An article in the June 6, 1914 edition of The Argus remarked on a Catonsville resident's birthday celebration. " Elias Livezey , Catonsville's oldest living resident, Wednesday observed his ninety-fifth birthday at Elkton Park, his home on Ingleside avenue, by entertaining the members of his family. Mr. Livezey, who is the father-in-law of Bernard N. Baker , the well-known financier, is quite active considering his age, and daily visits his city office 22 East Lexington Street, which he has occupied for more than 60 years.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
For anyone who has ever longed for the charm of an English-inspired country home within Baltimore City, 38 Warrenton Road in Guilford just might be the perfect cup of tea. Built in 1924, this three-story stone and stucco home, embellished with gables and dormers, is open for viewing and priced at $825,000. "All of the houses on this part of the street are good, medium-sized Guilford homes; not overwhelming, not mansions," said listing agent Frank Locke of Chase, Fitzgerald & Co. With a 3,830-square-foot living space, the home has six bedrooms, three full bathrooms and one half-bathroom.
EXPLORE
March 6, 2013
An article in the March 8, 1913, edition of The Argus noted that area woman's actions not to bother other patients worsened her own condition at an area hospital. Miss Elizabeth West , sister of Thos. West , of Bloomingdale avenue, is confined to her bed with a badly swollen limb and blood poisoning may develop. Miss West, who has been an invalid since birth, with only one limb, managed to get about with the use of crutches. Several months ago, she was taken to Spring Grove State Hospital, where she abandoned her crutches to avoid disturbing the other patients, and it is said resorted to crawling about, and it was while so doing that the splinter from the floor entered her limb several days ago. The limb began to swell and show symptoms of blood poisoning and she was removed to the infirmary.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
When the violence in Syria began spinning out of control last year, the Obama administration made the unusual decision to bring its ambassador to the troubled country home. And for Ambassador Robert Ford, coming home has long meant returning to Baltimore. The 54-year-old veteran diplomat, who won worldwide acclaim for making a dramatic trip last summer to meet with Syrian protesters, has for years chosen to live in Baltimore when stateside. He has embraced the city's culture and character, which fit his personality far better than Washington ever could.
BUSINESS
By Pat Emory and Pat Emory,Special to The Sun | January 20, 1991
EASTON -- "A place in the country," tucked away amid golden wheat fields, pastures full of grazing cattle, and big, old red barns is what many potential homebuyers envision when they ride across the Bay Bridge in search of land on Maryland's Eastern Shore.But recent zoning changes that sharply restrict housing development in four counties of the Shore are making the dream of living along the picturesque, rural back roads less attainable.Fear of losing farmland and, consequently, the farming industry, have prompted county officials in Queen Anne's, Kent and Caroline counties to adopt some of the most restrictive zoning in the state.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1997
First, the exodus was from city to suburb. Now Maryland churches, especially large evangelical parishes serving young professionals, are following congregations from suburb to the farmland beyond.It is proving to be a very difficult step to make.Take the case of Riverdale Baptist Church, a storied Prince George's County congregation battling to build a 112,000-square-foot complex in rural south Anne Arundel County over fierce protest from the wealthy neighborhood. The National Cathedral in Washington is two-thirds the size of Riverdale's proposed complex.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | March 28, 2008
When the daily grind of a busy career got in the way of Susan Wolcott's dream, it was time to make a decision. Five years ago, she left her Fairfax, Va., job in corporate health care and headed for the hills of Washington County in Western Maryland. "I took a total risk," said Wolcott, 56, "but for me, it was not about the money." It was about pursuing, along with her sister, a viable knitting business that includes organized stitching getaways, an online pattern company and a retail store in the front two rooms of her 18th-century house in Funkstown.
NEWS
By Beth Smith | October 6, 1996
When designer Ed Stough signed on to create the interiors of a country home in Baltimore County, he realized the trick would be to balance the formality and sophistication desired by his clients with the reality of their everyday life. They had two growing sons and two friendly golden retrievers.Combining the husband's preference for Louis XV furniture, the wife's love of traditional English pieces, and a family's need for comfortable spaces, he carefully crafted rooms with elements to please everyone.
EXPLORE
March 6, 2013
An article in the March 8, 1913, edition of The Argus noted that area woman's actions not to bother other patients worsened her own condition at an area hospital. Miss Elizabeth West , sister of Thos. West , of Bloomingdale avenue, is confined to her bed with a badly swollen limb and blood poisoning may develop. Miss West, who has been an invalid since birth, with only one limb, managed to get about with the use of crutches. Several months ago, she was taken to Spring Grove State Hospital, where she abandoned her crutches to avoid disturbing the other patients, and it is said resorted to crawling about, and it was while so doing that the splinter from the floor entered her limb several days ago. The limb began to swell and show symptoms of blood poisoning and she was removed to the infirmary.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
When the violence in Syria began spinning out of control last year, the Obama administration made the unusual decision to bring its ambassador to the troubled country home. And for Ambassador Robert Ford, coming home has long meant returning to Baltimore. The 54-year-old veteran diplomat, who won worldwide acclaim for making a dramatic trip last summer to meet with Syrian protesters, has for years chosen to live in Baltimore when stateside. He has embraced the city's culture and character, which fit his personality far better than Washington ever could.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | March 28, 2008
When the daily grind of a busy career got in the way of Susan Wolcott's dream, it was time to make a decision. Five years ago, she left her Fairfax, Va., job in corporate health care and headed for the hills of Washington County in Western Maryland. "I took a total risk," said Wolcott, 56, "but for me, it was not about the money." It was about pursuing, along with her sister, a viable knitting business that includes organized stitching getaways, an online pattern company and a retail store in the front two rooms of her 18th-century house in Funkstown.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | February 25, 2008
LOS ANGELES -- Last night was a great time to be Joel and Ethan Coen, as the Minnesota-born brothers performed an Oscar hat-trick, collecting gold statuettes for producing, writing and directing 2007's best picture winner, No Country for Old Men. The film, the story of a drug deal gone horribly bad and the aftermath gone even worse, was the evening's most-honored film, winning four Oscars.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | August 20, 2007
Mildred Glover, who served as an assistant dean at Morgan State University for nearly 15 years before retiring in 2005 and who ran an underdog campaign for president of the United States in 2004, died Wednesday of a heart attack at her home in Northeast Baltimore. She was 72. Born Mildred William in Savannah, Ga., she served in the Georgia General Assembly for eight years, starting in the 1970s, before moving to Baltimore in 1989. Her presidential campaign, which her husband said was cut short because of illness, focused on finding jobs for the unemployed and ending the war in Iraq.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 18, 2001
Every time David Hochheimer and his wife, Emily Zaas, leave their house in Maryland they have to travel through Pennsylvania just to get to the end of their driveway. That's because they live in Lineboro, a small Carroll County community on the Maryland border. The Mason-Dixon Line passes through their property. "We have 65 acres total with about 3 acres in Pennsylvania," said Hochheimer, who has lived in Lineboro since 1970. "It's a cozy little town, and it's a very comfortable town. I can pretty much walk up and down Main Street, and I would know most of the people."
FEATURES
By Jill Schensul and Jill Schensul,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 1998
I was miserable over my coffee, listening to the bleached-blond waitress telling another customer about her waitress jobs and her kids and a former life or two. The other woman, in the booth beside us at the Denny's in Fallon, Nev., nodded knowingly.My head was swimming. I was overwhelmed by America.Three days out on our cross-country RV trip, and I was succumbing to the daunting vastness. I wanted to sit down with every gum-cracking waitress and ambling young gas jockey we met. I wanted to drive down all the Main Streets, smell the nuances in the air, and stare at the massive heavy skies and eat grits until I exploded.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | February 25, 2008
LOS ANGELES -- Last night was a great time to be Joel and Ethan Coen, as the Minnesota-born brothers performed an Oscar hat-trick, collecting gold statuettes for producing, writing and directing 2007's best picture winner, No Country for Old Men. The film, the story of a drug deal gone horribly bad and the aftermath gone even worse, was the evening's most-honored film, winning four Oscars.
FEATURES
By Jill Schensul and Jill Schensul,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 1998
I was miserable over my coffee, listening to the bleached-blond waitress telling another customer about her waitress jobs and her kids and a former life or two. The other woman, in the booth beside us at the Denny's in Fallon, Nev., nodded knowingly.My head was swimming. I was overwhelmed by America.Three days out on our cross-country RV trip, and I was succumbing to the daunting vastness. I wanted to sit down with every gum-cracking waitress and ambling young gas jockey we met. I wanted to drive down all the Main Streets, smell the nuances in the air, and stare at the massive heavy skies and eat grits until I exploded.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1997
First, the exodus was from city to suburb. Now Maryland churches, especially large evangelical parishes serving young professionals, are following congregations from suburb to the farmland beyond.It is proving to be a very difficult step to make.Take the case of Riverdale Baptist Church, a storied Prince George's County congregation battling to build a 112,000-square-foot complex in rural south Anne Arundel County over fierce protest from the wealthy neighborhood. The National Cathedral in Washington is two-thirds the size of Riverdale's proposed complex.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.