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NEWS
February 1, 2005
On January 31, 2005, ROSALEE, beloved aunt of Colleen Countess. She is also survived by a host of great nieces, nephews and other relatives. Friends may visit the JAMES A. MORTON & SONS FUNERAL HOMES, INC., 1701 Laurens St., Wednesday, 3 to 7 P.M. Funeral services will be held Thursday at St. Peter Claver Catholic Church, 1526 N. Fremont Avenue. The family will receive friends 9:30 to 10 A.M. followed by Services.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser | July 17, 2012
Well, we pick up this week back in London as the ladies finish off their quick girls' trip. We're quickly thrown into the crazy mix when Sonja announces that she is going to ice her face in the bidet. Only Ms. Sonja Morgan would do such a thing with so much grace and nonchalance.  Later, Sonja arranges for the girls to play croquet. As Sonja says, "When in London, one must pay croquet. " But the friendly game quickly becomes competitive between LuAnn and Carole. The Princess's inner competitor was provoked and proves her skill when she beats the Countess.
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NEWS
July 20, 2005
On July 16, 2005 TROY MONTE' COUNTESS, SR. beloved son of Nadine C. Gale; devoted father of Troy, Jr. He is also survived by a grandmother Dorothy Gale, aunts, uncles, cousins, and a host of friends, including a special and devoted friend Stephanie Jones. Viewing will be at the JOSEPH L. RUSS FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 2222 W. North Avenue on Thursday from 3 to 8 p.m. The family will receive friends at Faith Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1900 E. North Avenue on Friday from 6 to 6:30 p.m. when funeral services will begin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | February 22, 2009
The Shakespeare Theatre Company's production of The Dog in the Manger is so lucid and lusty, so sumptuous, funny and achingly felt, that its sole failure of vision is all the more puzzling. With consummate skill, director Jonathan Munby explores each nuance and unravels every twisted strand of Lope de Vega's 17th-century tragi-comedy from Spain's Golden Age - with one exception. Michael Hayden is a dexterous performer, but I think he's wrong for the romantic male lead, and the miscasting obscures a major theme.
NEWS
January 6, 2004
Bernice Countess, a former cook and caterer, died of Alzheimer's disease Wednesday at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center & Hospital. The longtime West Baltimore resident was 92. Bernice Campbell was born and raised in the city's Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood, and attended city public schools. She was married in the 1920s to Ervin Waters, who died in 1930. She was married in 1942 to Henry Countess, a truck driver who died in 1944. For more than 25 years, Mrs. Countess was a cook at the Boys Home Society Inc., a group home for troubled youths in the 800 block of Park Ave. She retired in 1976.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 27, 2006
Two fiercely lonely people in 1930s China, one a blind former American diplomat, the other a Russian countess forced to flee her homeland, find comfort and unexpected salvation in their tentative, chaste relationship. All the while, China and its people are bracing for the attack from Japan that is sure to come. The White Countess is the final film from the producer-director team of Ismail Merchant (who died in May at 68) and James Ivory, who carved out a cinematic niche for themselves by crafting films of great taste, refinement and discretion - films that reached their pinnacle with 1985's A Room With a View and 1993's The Remains of the Day. The new film can't match either of those career highlights, but it does showcase both the pros and cons of the team's distinctive approach to late-20th-century filmmaking.
SPORTS
By Pete Bielski and Pete Bielski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 1997
Being an owner, breeder, trainer, farmer and even the feed man on his farm, John Ferguson defines horse racing's home-bred side. Even his wife, Aileen, breaks the yearlings at Hargett Farms in Clarksburg.Although Ferguson does it all, yesterday he experienced a first -- winning a stakes race.Doing the honors at Laurel Park was Aileen's Countess, a 5-year-old mare who took the winner's share of the $50,000 Snow Goose Handicap by three lengths.Fittingly, the victory was secured by a horse named after Aileen Ferguson.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2005
Rosalee T. "Kitty" Countess, a retired usher and cloakroom attendant whose cheerful and unflappable demeanor endeared her to Lyric Opera House patrons for more than two decades, died in her sleep Sunday at Milford Manor Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Pikesville. She was 87. Born and raised in Baltimore, Miss Countess was a graduate of St. Peter Claver parochial school and, after leaving Frederick Douglass High School, worked as a housekeeper with her mother during the 1930s. During World War II, she was a riveter building airplanes at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | January 23, 1993
Every family has secrets that prove painful to uncover. But in drama, the process can provide pleasure and surprise for viewers, as illustrated by a new "Masterpiece Theatre" premiering this weekend."
NEWS
June 27, 1994
POLICE LOGBrooklyn Park: A man tried to rob the Countess Beauty Salon in the 4100 block of Grove Road about 5 p.m. Thursday, but was thwarted by an employee, police said.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
Solothal "Itchy Man" Thomas, the West Baltimore hit man whose uncanny ability to avoid conviction turned him into a symbol of the endemic problems troubling state courts in Baltimore, will spend the rest of his life in prison after a federal jury found him guilty yesterday of murder for hire. Over a two-week trial in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, the Maryland U.S. attorney's office showcased its ability to turn the leaders of one of the city's largest drug organizations against each other, doled out protection for jittery witnesses and warned co-defendants that they could face lengthy prison sentences if they chose not to cooperate.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 27, 2006
Two fiercely lonely people in 1930s China, one a blind former American diplomat, the other a Russian countess forced to flee her homeland, find comfort and unexpected salvation in their tentative, chaste relationship. All the while, China and its people are bracing for the attack from Japan that is sure to come. The White Countess is the final film from the producer-director team of Ismail Merchant (who died in May at 68) and James Ivory, who carved out a cinematic niche for themselves by crafting films of great taste, refinement and discretion - films that reached their pinnacle with 1985's A Room With a View and 1993's The Remains of the Day. The new film can't match either of those career highlights, but it does showcase both the pros and cons of the team's distinctive approach to late-20th-century filmmaking.
NEWS
July 20, 2005
On July 16, 2005 TROY MONTE' COUNTESS, SR. beloved son of Nadine C. Gale; devoted father of Troy, Jr. He is also survived by a grandmother Dorothy Gale, aunts, uncles, cousins, and a host of friends, including a special and devoted friend Stephanie Jones. Viewing will be at the JOSEPH L. RUSS FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 2222 W. North Avenue on Thursday from 3 to 8 p.m. The family will receive friends at Faith Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1900 E. North Avenue on Friday from 6 to 6:30 p.m. when funeral services will begin.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2005
Rosalee T. "Kitty" Countess, a retired usher and cloakroom attendant whose cheerful and unflappable demeanor endeared her to Lyric Opera House patrons for more than two decades, died in her sleep Sunday at Milford Manor Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Pikesville. She was 87. Born and raised in Baltimore, Miss Countess was a graduate of St. Peter Claver parochial school and, after leaving Frederick Douglass High School, worked as a housekeeper with her mother during the 1930s. During World War II, she was a riveter building airplanes at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River.
NEWS
February 1, 2005
On January 31, 2005, ROSALEE, beloved aunt of Colleen Countess. She is also survived by a host of great nieces, nephews and other relatives. Friends may visit the JAMES A. MORTON & SONS FUNERAL HOMES, INC., 1701 Laurens St., Wednesday, 3 to 7 P.M. Funeral services will be held Thursday at St. Peter Claver Catholic Church, 1526 N. Fremont Avenue. The family will receive friends 9:30 to 10 A.M. followed by Services.
NEWS
January 6, 2004
Bernice Countess, a former cook and caterer, died of Alzheimer's disease Wednesday at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center & Hospital. The longtime West Baltimore resident was 92. Bernice Campbell was born and raised in the city's Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood, and attended city public schools. She was married in the 1920s to Ervin Waters, who died in 1930. She was married in 1942 to Henry Countess, a truck driver who died in 1944. For more than 25 years, Mrs. Countess was a cook at the Boys Home Society Inc., a group home for troubled youths in the 800 block of Park Ave. She retired in 1976.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
Solothal "Itchy Man" Thomas, the West Baltimore hit man whose uncanny ability to avoid conviction turned him into a symbol of the endemic problems troubling state courts in Baltimore, will spend the rest of his life in prison after a federal jury found him guilty yesterday of murder for hire. Over a two-week trial in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, the Maryland U.S. attorney's office showcased its ability to turn the leaders of one of the city's largest drug organizations against each other, doled out protection for jittery witnesses and warned co-defendants that they could face lengthy prison sentences if they chose not to cooperate.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 7, 2002
Shakespeare created a number of strong, smart female characters, and Helena in All's Well That Ends Well would appear to be one of them. She goes after what she wants - marriage to a nobleman named Bertram - with unflagging determination and no shortage of stratagems. And, as the title indicates, she gets her prize in the end. Considering the nature of that prize, however, you have to wonder how smart she really is. Bertram is an impudent, spoiled, rich boy who openly disdains lovely Helena, and there's little reason to believe he's had a true change of heart by the final curtain.
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