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By Los Angeles Times | May 4, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Moving to close holes in the U.S. counterspy network exposed by the Aldrich H. Ames case, President Clinton overhauled the nation's counterintelligence structure yesterday.But Mr. Clinton's changes, unveiled at a Senate intelligence committee hearing, received a skeptical reception from leaders of the panel, who argued that the revisions stop short of the needed reforms.Sen. Dennis DeConcini, D-Ariz., the committee's chairman, angrily accused CIA Director R. James Woolsey of "posturing" in opposing a Senate bill that would deal with the problem bygiving the FBI overall counterintelligence responsibility.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2011
Rowland Ashmead Morrow, a lawyer and retired U.S. Defense Department counterintelligence official, died May 11 of complications from a neurological condition at his Mercy Ridge retirement community home. The former longtime Guilford resident was 87. Mr. Morrow, the son of a physician and a librarian, was born in Salisbury, Pa., and was raised there and in State College, Pa., and Philadelphia. After graduating in 1941 from Central High School in Philadelphia, Mr. Morrow enlisted in the Army.
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NEWS
April 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Energy Department for nearly 20 years ignored warnings about security risks at nuclear weapons laboratories as dangers "languished for years without resolution or repercussions" against responsible officials, congressional investigators conclude in a scathing report.With the laboratories under heightened scrutiny because of allegations that China stole nuclear weapons secrets, the General Accounting Office documented its warnings in 32 reports over the past 19 years, listing nearly 50 recommendations it claimed were mostly neglected.
NEWS
By Andrea Siegel and Andrea Siegel,Sun Reporter | October 21, 2006
A fire fanned by gusty winds ripped through a building at Fort Meade yesterday that houses several military offices, including an intelligence unit with sensitive security material. The area was evacuated shortly after the fire broke out, post officials said. Firefighters from Prince George's, Howard and Anne Arundel counties and from Fort Meade responded to the six-alarm blaze at the fort in western Anne Arundel County. The fire broke out sometime after 3 p.m. and produced billowing smoke that could be seen for miles.
NEWS
By Andrea Siegel and Andrea Siegel,Sun Reporter | October 21, 2006
A fire fanned by gusty winds ripped through a building at Fort Meade yesterday that houses several military offices, including an intelligence unit with sensitive security material. The area was evacuated shortly after the fire broke out, post officials said. Firefighters from Prince George's, Howard and Anne Arundel counties and from Fort Meade responded to the six-alarm blaze at the fort in western Anne Arundel County. The fire broke out sometime after 3 p.m. and produced billowing smoke that could be seen for miles.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Carl M. Cannon and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 23, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In a stunning post-Cold War spy case, the FBI announced yesterday the arrest of a Central Intelligence Agency official and his wife -- both accused of spying for the Russians in a scandal that jolted fragile U.S.-Russia relations.Aldrich Hazen "Rick" Ames was described by the White House as a "mid-level" CIA employee, but from 1983 to 1985 he headed the Soviet branch of the CIA's counterintelligence unit and in that capacity controlled information that literally meant life and death to U.S. spies operating in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS BIRCH and DOUGLAS BIRCH,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 23, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Even as the United States and Russia are cooperating to resolve international crises and track militant Islamic groups, Moscow is working at least as hard at stealing U.S. military and industrial secrets as during the Soviet era, current and former intelligence officials say. Moscow's spies operate under a larger variety of "covers" than in Soviet days, experts say, and their morale is the highest since the mid-1980s. The Russian diaspora has created a pool of emigres, some of whom can be bribed, cajoled or blackmailed into helping.
NEWS
By Greg Krikorian and Greg Krikorian,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 2003
He walked into the Dallas office of the FBI late on a Friday afternoon in 1980. Frank Varelli said he had information about some killings in his native El Salvador. He listed dates and places. He named names. "We contacted the CIA, and they verified the killings were committed," recalled Gary Penrith, then acting head of the FBI office. "So this guy looked like he might be giving us reliable information." With the FBI's blessing, Varelli infiltrated the Dallas branch of a group he said was behind the killings - the Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador, which opposed U.S. policy in Central America.
NEWS
March 9, 2004
Robert Wesley Doms, a retired career Army officer and counter-intelligence expert, died of heart failure Wednesday at his Timonium home. He was 74. Mr. Doms was born in St. Paul, Minn., and raised in Grand Rapids, Minn. He earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Nebraska at Omaha and a master's in education from the Johns Hopkins University in the 1970s. Mr. Doms enlisted in the Army in 1946 and served with the 1st Division Band. He later attained the rank of lieutenant colonel and served two tours in Vietnam in intelligence.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2003
Arthur R. Blom, a retired Army colonel who landed with North African invasion forces during World War II and directed the military intelligence school at Fort Holabird, died Monday of cardiac arrest at the Blakehurst Retirement Community in Towson. The former Towson and Glen Arm resident was 88. Born and raised in Seattle, he earned a degree in business and economics at the University of Washington in 1936. An honors graduate of his ROTC program, he was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Army.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS BIRCH and DOUGLAS BIRCH,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 23, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Even as the United States and Russia are cooperating to resolve international crises and track militant Islamic groups, Moscow is working at least as hard at stealing U.S. military and industrial secrets as during the Soviet era, current and former intelligence officials say. Moscow's spies operate under a larger variety of "covers" than in Soviet days, experts say, and their morale is the highest since the mid-1980s. The Russian diaspora has created a pool of emigres, some of whom can be bribed, cajoled or blackmailed into helping.
NEWS
March 9, 2004
Robert Wesley Doms, a retired career Army officer and counter-intelligence expert, died of heart failure Wednesday at his Timonium home. He was 74. Mr. Doms was born in St. Paul, Minn., and raised in Grand Rapids, Minn. He earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Nebraska at Omaha and a master's in education from the Johns Hopkins University in the 1970s. Mr. Doms enlisted in the Army in 1946 and served with the 1st Division Band. He later attained the rank of lieutenant colonel and served two tours in Vietnam in intelligence.
NEWS
By Greg Krikorian and Greg Krikorian,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 2003
He walked into the Dallas office of the FBI late on a Friday afternoon in 1980. Frank Varelli said he had information about some killings in his native El Salvador. He listed dates and places. He named names. "We contacted the CIA, and they verified the killings were committed," recalled Gary Penrith, then acting head of the FBI office. "So this guy looked like he might be giving us reliable information." With the FBI's blessing, Varelli infiltrated the Dallas branch of a group he said was behind the killings - the Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador, which opposed U.S. policy in Central America.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2003
Arthur R. Blom, a retired Army colonel who landed with North African invasion forces during World War II and directed the military intelligence school at Fort Holabird, died Monday of cardiac arrest at the Blakehurst Retirement Community in Towson. The former Towson and Glen Arm resident was 88. Born and raised in Seattle, he earned a degree in business and economics at the University of Washington in 1936. An honors graduate of his ROTC program, he was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Army.
NEWS
April 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Energy Department for nearly 20 years ignored warnings about security risks at nuclear weapons laboratories as dangers "languished for years without resolution or repercussions" against responsible officials, congressional investigators conclude in a scathing report.With the laboratories under heightened scrutiny because of allegations that China stole nuclear weapons secrets, the General Accounting Office documented its warnings in 32 reports over the past 19 years, listing nearly 50 recommendations it claimed were mostly neglected.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Tom Bowman and Scott Shane and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The FBI has begun a counterintelligence investigation at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory at Aberdeen Proving Ground into allegations of the possible transfer of advanced technology to China and perhaps other countries, according to officials and sources familiar with the probe."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 20, 2011
Rowland Ashmead Morrow, a lawyer and retired U.S. Defense Department counterintelligence official, died May 11 of complications from a neurological condition at his Mercy Ridge retirement community home. The former longtime Guilford resident was 87. Mr. Morrow, the son of a physician and a librarian, was born in Salisbury, Pa., and was raised there and in State College, Pa., and Philadelphia. After graduating in 1941 from Central High School in Philadelphia, Mr. Morrow enlisted in the Army.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 22, 1997
LONDON -- Want to sign up with Britain's once super-secret domestic counterintelligence service?Then call the recruitment office representing MI5, which kicked off its first-ever open advertising campaign in yesterday's Guardian newspaper.The Security Service wants people with three to four years of work experience, a top college degree, a proven track record managing people and the "analytical ability to cut through a mass of detail to get at the true picture."The salary is "good rather than lavish."
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