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By HELEN CHAPPELL | November 9, 1994
Oysterback, Maryland. -- After the Ocean City-bound Trailways pulled away from Ray Bob's Gas'n'Go, Count Dracula came out of the men's room and realized that he had missed the bus. When you're a thousand years old, your bladder just doesn't hold up like it did when you were only a kid of 500. His suitcase was on the bus, too. Right now it was headed for Thresher's Fries without him, with the pair of Ward decoys he had just purchased rolled up in his shorts.''That's...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
Forget the reigning image of Count Dracula as upscale lounge lizard. Cast off the dominant picture of homegrown vampires as sex-crazed or love-struck, mixed-up kids. F.W. Murnau's "Nosferatu" (1922) uses a fanged, hypnotic demon to throw a spell that follows you home from the theater and stays with you for days — and nights — on end. It's the evil-fairy godfather of all great horror movies. Seeing it on the AFI Silver's big screen at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Friday, with a live score by D.C.'s Silent Orchestra, is an experience that connoisseurs of the creepy should not pass up. They will savor every Transylvanian minute — and every minute set in the fictional town of Wisbourg, Germany, too. (If you can't make it, Kino has released the film in a splendid two-disc DVD edition.)
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NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1995
Count Dracula, the Little Witch and the Phantom of the Courthouse paid an early visit to the students at Mills-Parole Elementary School yesterday, part of a Halloween reading program with volunteers from the Anne Arundel County State's Attorney's office.For the third year in a row, about 20 members of the prosecutor's office, many in costume, read stories to classes at the Annapolis school and handed out treats.Count Dracula -- Deputy State's Attorney William D. Roessler in real life -- evoked wide-eyed stares and squeals as he walked through the school's hallways with red streaks of fake blood dripping from the corners of his mouth and a black cape flowing behind him.But he wasn't there to sink his teeth into anyone.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1995
Count Dracula, the Little Witch and the Phantom of the Courthouse paid an early visit to the students at Mills-Parole Elementary School yesterday, part of a Halloween reading program with volunteers from the Anne Arundel County State's Attorney's office.For the third year in a row, about 20 members of the prosecutor's office, many in costume, read stories to classes at the Annapolis school and handed out treats.Count Dracula -- Deputy State's Attorney William D. Roessler in real life -- evoked wide-eyed stares and squeals as he walked through the school's hallways with red streaks of fake blood dripping from the corners of his mouth and a black cape flowing behind him.But he wasn't there to sink his teeth into anyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
Forget the reigning image of Count Dracula as upscale lounge lizard. Cast off the dominant picture of homegrown vampires as sex-crazed or love-struck, mixed-up kids. F.W. Murnau's "Nosferatu" (1922) uses a fanged, hypnotic demon to throw a spell that follows you home from the theater and stays with you for days — and nights — on end. It's the evil-fairy godfather of all great horror movies. Seeing it on the AFI Silver's big screen at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Friday, with a live score by D.C.'s Silent Orchestra, is an experience that connoisseurs of the creepy should not pass up. They will savor every Transylvanian minute — and every minute set in the fictional town of Wisbourg, Germany, too. (If you can't make it, Kino has released the film in a splendid two-disc DVD edition.)
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | February 23, 1992
Q: I'm interested in collecting Dracula items, including toys, figures, books and movie memorabilia. How can I find such items, and are there any collectors I can contact?A: Contact the Count Dracula Fan Club, in care of M. Jeanne Youngson, 29 Washington Square West, New York, N.Y. 10011; (212) 982-6754. Also contact the Count Dracula Society, in care of club president Donald A. Reed, 334 W. 54th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 90037; (213) 752-5811.Dracula & Co. publishes the Nocturnal News, Box 213, Metairie, La. 70004; (504)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
In lieu of my Wednesday Midweek Madness post, I figured I would wait a day so I could take note of Halloween. And what better way than with a little bite from Heinrich Marschner's "Der Vampyr"? This 1828 opera, which had some popularity back in the day, has a pretty cool story about Lord Ruthven, a vampire causing havoc in England -- decades before Bram Stoker imagined a visit by Count Dracula. I saw the opera ages ago, and I vaguely recall that it contained some cool things.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 27, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- Director Francis Ford Coppola wants to make it quite clear that his Dracula movie is unlike any other Dracula movie. He's calling it "Bram Stoker's Dracula," and claims it is the only film version that offers the complete story from the 1897 Stoker novel of the vampire count, which has been made into scores of movies through the years.Coppola's film, which is finishing up shooting on the Columbia lot, stars Gary Oldman as Count Dracula, Winona Ryder as Mina and Anthony Hopkins as Van Helsing in a particularly erotic telling of the Dracula legend.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | June 13, 1995
That Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli was a legend with a cult following rather than merely a famous musician with fans indicates how mysterious a figure the Italian pianist was.Mr. Michelangeli, who died yesterday in Lugano, Switzerland, at the age of 75, was one of the greatest pianists of all time and perhaps -- in purely technical terms -- the most perfect pianist of the 20th century. Yet even in death, he was shrouded in mystery. Although his death was presumed to have come from heart failure, his attending physician, who requested anonymity, said that the pianist had asked him to keep the cause of his death secret.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,Contributing Writer | November 13, 1992
"Two puncture wounds upon the neck!" exclaims Professor Van Helsing, who knows a vampire bite when she sees one. Mina Murray, bloodless and with a punctured throat, has become a victim of Count Dracula."Dracula," the famous tale of horror and suspense, will be staged tonight and tomorrow night by students of North Carroll High School. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. and the curtain rises at 8. Tickets are $3.Those small, red wounds appear again and again in the clever production by drama instructor Roberta Rooney.
NEWS
By HELEN CHAPPELL | November 9, 1994
Oysterback, Maryland. -- After the Ocean City-bound Trailways pulled away from Ray Bob's Gas'n'Go, Count Dracula came out of the men's room and realized that he had missed the bus. When you're a thousand years old, your bladder just doesn't hold up like it did when you were only a kid of 500. His suitcase was on the bus, too. Right now it was headed for Thresher's Fries without him, with the pair of Ward decoys he had just purchased rolled up in his shorts.''That's...
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | April 3, 2009
Classic movies are returning to the Senator this weekend, part of an effort to derail the scheduled April 20 foreclosure auction of the 70-year-old North Baltimore landmark. Bob Fosse's 1972 Cabaret, with Liza Minnelli in her Oscar-winning role, and Christopher Lee in 1958's Horror of Dracula kick off what outgoing owner Tom Kiefaber plans as a series of classic-film screenings, with proceeds used to defray operating costs and work toward bringing current the theater's mortgage. Cabaret, which won eight Oscars (and probably would have won nine, had a little film called The Godfather not won Best Picture)
FEATURES
By Nancy Pate | October 30, 1994
Although Anne Rice is the most famous of contemporary vampire novelists, she is by no means the only one.Several hundred vampire novels have been published in the past 25 years, with writers such as Chelsea Yarbro, Fred Saberhagen, P. N. Elrod, Tanith Lee, Lori Herter and Elaine Bergstrom turning out multiple tales. Horrormeisters Stephen King, Peter Straub and Clive Barker have all tried their hand at fictional vampires.Here's a look at some of the latest offerings in the genre:* "The Secret Life of Laszlo, Count Dracula," by Roderick Anscombe (Hyperion, $22.95)
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