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By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1990
Whether he took the name himself or had the title bestowed on him, the late Count Basie will always be high on the lists of the American musical aristocracy.The city of Annapolis will be able to enjoy his legacy at 8 tomorrow night at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, when the celebrated Count Basie Orchestra performs as part of the annual Kunta Kinte High Heritage Day Celebrations. The visit is part of a tour that also included stops in Japan.Although Basie died in 1984, the band continues to record and perform internationally under the direction of Frank Foster, a saxophonist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2004
Nobody questions the nobility of those two grandmasters of big-band jazz, Duke Ellington and Count Basie. They were the best. Ellington issued his manifesto: "It Don't Mean a Thing, If It Ain't Got That Swing." But Count Basie made "that swing" the throbbing heart of his music. Ellngton's music rose like a cathedral from the solid foundation of Harry Carney's baritone sax. Basie's band floated like a racing yacht on the rhythm guitar of Freddie Green, the mainspring of the Basie rhythm section.
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NEWS
March 31, 1999
Joe Williams, 80, whose smooth baritone and collaborations with Count Basie won him acclaim as one of the great voices of jazz, collapsed and died on a Las Vegas city street Monday. He apparently died of natural causes, the Clark County coroner said. Mr. Williams became a sensation in 1955 when he recorded "Everyday I Have the Blues" with Count Basie, and the two were together for seven years. He repeatedly was chosen the top male jazz singer in readers' polls for Downbeat and other magazines.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 21, 2001
A uniquely American art form - jazz, in all its vocal and instrumental glory - takes center stage this weekend at Columbia Festival of the Arts, with national, regional and local artists evoking the spirits of such pioneering performers as Count Basie, Cannonball Adderley and Billie Holiday. The Baltimore-Washington Jazzfest, tomorrow through Sunday at five sites in Columbia, grew from a one-night, single-venue event nine years ago to a weekend celebration, now in its sixth year. "We're here to promote jazz, pure and simple," says John Tegler, host of "Jazz Straight Ahead" on WEAA-FM and one of Jazzfest's principal planners.
NEWS
April 30, 1993
Student musicians and vocalists will pay tribute to pianist Count Basie and trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie on "Jazz Nite," Western Maryland College's end-of-semester evening of live jazz Thursday.The concert, scheduled for 8 p.m. in the Decker College Center Forum, will be free and refreshments will be provided.Players and singers from three campus jazz groups will be led by "Jazz Nite" organizer Bo Eckard, a music lecturer at the college.The WMC Jazz Ensemble, a 21-piece group featuring some of the best musicians from the college and area high schools, will offer several Count Basie numbers in classic big band arrangements augmented by French horns, a tuba and contrabass clarinet.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 21, 2001
A uniquely American art form - jazz, in all its vocal and instrumental glory - takes center stage this weekend at Columbia Festival of the Arts, with national, regional and local artists evoking the spirits of such pioneering performers as Count Basie, Cannonball Adderley and Billie Holiday. The Baltimore-Washington Jazzfest, tomorrow through Sunday at five sites in Columbia, grew from a one-night, single-venue event nine years ago to a weekend celebration, now in its sixth year. "We're here to promote jazz, pure and simple," says John Tegler, host of "Jazz Straight Ahead" on WEAA-FM and one of Jazzfest's principal planners.
NEWS
August 16, 1991
Taslim Elias, former president of the International Court of Justice and the first Nigerian to become his country's attorney general, died Wednesday at a Lagos hospital. He was 76. He became Nigeria's attorney general and justice minister at its independence from Britain in 1960. After six years as law professor at the University of Lagos, he was appointed to the International Court of Justice -- the judicial arm of the United Nations now called the World Court -- in 1972. He was elected the court's vice president in 1979 and its president in 1982.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 30, 1990
NO MORE GAMES THE REMIX ALBUMNew Kids On the Block (Columbia 48959)Remix albums like "No More Games" by New Kids On the Block are popular for two reasons. One, they make it easy for an established act to stay hot on today's dance-friendly pop charts, and two, remixing existing singles is considerably cheaper than recording new ones. But remix albums don't have to be rehashes; sometimes, they almost reinvent old songs. Indeed, many of the New Kids tunes on "No More Games" do sound better the second time around; "Step By Step" seems invigorated by its new house-style rhythm tracks, and the funky reggae remake of "Hangin' Tough" is a delight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2004
Nobody questions the nobility of those two grandmasters of big-band jazz, Duke Ellington and Count Basie. They were the best. Ellington issued his manifesto: "It Don't Mean a Thing, If It Ain't Got That Swing." But Count Basie made "that swing" the throbbing heart of his music. Ellngton's music rose like a cathedral from the solid foundation of Harry Carney's baritone sax. Basie's band floated like a racing yacht on the rhythm guitar of Freddie Green, the mainspring of the Basie rhythm section.
NEWS
By Diane B. Mikulis and Diane B. Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 1999
IT'S NOT often that a musical legend comes to Howard County. But soon you will have a chance to hear a group whose name is synonymous with big band jazz.The Count Basie Orchestra -- known for its style and electrifying performances -- will take the stage at 8 p.m. March 17 at Glenelg High School, whose own jazz ensemble is making a name for itself.The Basie group debuted in 1935, and has been going strong ever since. It has won 17 Grammy awards, including one this year for a new compact disc, "Count Plays Duke."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 2000
We're in the midst of a "swing" revival that's sweeping clubs and dance halls across the country, as a new generation discovers the vibrant, rhythmic precision of the classic jazz style of the 1930s. On the other hand, you can't revive something that never died. And as jazz aficionados know, sleek, graceful, joyously syncopated numbers such as "One O'Clock Jump," "Jumpin' at the Woodside," "Sent for You Yesterday" and other epic standards composed by the immortal Count Basie have never left the repertoire since coming to artistic life some six decades ago. Now, 16 years after Basie's death, his extraordinary orchestra is still going strong.
NEWS
March 31, 1999
Joe Williams, 80, whose smooth baritone and collaborations with Count Basie won him acclaim as one of the great voices of jazz, collapsed and died on a Las Vegas city street Monday. He apparently died of natural causes, the Clark County coroner said. Mr. Williams became a sensation in 1955 when he recorded "Everyday I Have the Blues" with Count Basie, and the two were together for seven years. He repeatedly was chosen the top male jazz singer in readers' polls for Downbeat and other magazines.
NEWS
By Diane B. Mikulis and Diane B. Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 1999
IT'S NOT often that a musical legend comes to Howard County. But soon you will have a chance to hear a group whose name is synonymous with big band jazz.The Count Basie Orchestra -- known for its style and electrifying performances -- will take the stage at 8 p.m. March 17 at Glenelg High School, whose own jazz ensemble is making a name for itself.The Basie group debuted in 1935, and has been going strong ever since. It has won 17 Grammy awards, including one this year for a new compact disc, "Count Plays Duke."
NEWS
June 7, 1997
Why not base all honors on person's race?I was absolutely shocked that only dead white people have been glorified with New Jersey Turnpike rest stops named after them. This obviously is another attempt by white people to neglect other races.I am so glad Candus Thomson (Perspective, June 1, "Which one doesn't belong?") has found yet another way to show why Americans should bicker among themselves about their race, color or creed. One up side to her article may be that she had to go out of Maryland to find this blatant act of bigotry.
NEWS
April 30, 1993
Student musicians and vocalists will pay tribute to pianist Count Basie and trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie on "Jazz Nite," Western Maryland College's end-of-semester evening of live jazz Thursday.The concert, scheduled for 8 p.m. in the Decker College Center Forum, will be free and refreshments will be provided.Players and singers from three campus jazz groups will be led by "Jazz Nite" organizer Bo Eckard, a music lecturer at the college.The WMC Jazz Ensemble, a 21-piece group featuring some of the best musicians from the college and area high schools, will offer several Count Basie numbers in classic big band arrangements augmented by French horns, a tuba and contrabass clarinet.
NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | January 21, 1993
January looms. The holidays are over, and sometimes that means a case of the January blues. How do you get rid of the gloom? A favorite way to lighten the load in our house is music. We turn on the stereo and get lost in sensational sounds. One minute of good music can turn our spirits from melancholy to happy.That's a reason we're all going to the Count Basie Orchestra concert at Glenelg High School Feb. 2. As good as recorded music sounds, nothing beats the real thing. This is an opportunity to get lost in the music and forget the blues.
NEWS
June 7, 1997
Why not base all honors on person's race?I was absolutely shocked that only dead white people have been glorified with New Jersey Turnpike rest stops named after them. This obviously is another attempt by white people to neglect other races.I am so glad Candus Thomson (Perspective, June 1, "Which one doesn't belong?") has found yet another way to show why Americans should bicker among themselves about their race, color or creed. One up side to her article may be that she had to go out of Maryland to find this blatant act of bigotry.
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