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NEWS
March 1, 2013
Regarding the recent arrest of Baltimore County Councilman Todd Huff on DUI charges, why does a part-time councilman warrant an automobile at the people's expense ("After arrest, Huff to give up county car," Feb. 26)? And why did it have to be a Jeep Grand Cherokee at a likely cost of over $30,000? Do county councilmen also get free fuel, maintenance and insurance? And why was Mr. Huff even driving this vehicle in the early morning hours? It seems to me that if councilmen are in such need of vehicles at taxpayers' expense they should at least confine their use of them to county business.
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NEWS
Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Two City Councilmen plan to submit legislation today requiring every police officer in Baltimore to wear a body camera that records audio and video as the officers go about their jobs. Warren Branch, chairman of the council's public safety committee, and Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young's proposal would permit the Baltimore Police Department to phase-in use of the body cameras during the first year after the bill, if approved, becomes law. The bill comes amid a series of high-profile allegations of police misconduct in Baltimore and around the country.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2010
Three months after city officials approved higher parking fines, two Baltimore City Council members have proposed lowering fees for double parking. When council members voted to increase fines for obstructing traffic or "blocking the box" at intersections, they more than tripled the penalty for double parking — from $77 to $250. Councilman William H. Cole IV and Councilman James B. Kraft, who represent Central and Southeast Baltimore neighborhoods where parking is scarce, introduced a bill at Monday night's council meeting that would lower the fine to $100.
NEWS
Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Two Baltimore County councilwomen survived primary challenges Tuesday while two other incumbents lost their seats. Four of the council's seven members faced opposition in a primary election that had light voter turnout across the region. Councilman Todd Huff, a Lutherville Republican, and Councilman Ken Oliver, a Randallstown Democrat, both fell to challengers. Democratic Councilwoman Vicki Almond prevailed in a challenge from Pikesville attorney Jon Herbst, and Council Chairwoman Cathy Bevins, also a Democrat, beat back opponent Jeff Beard.
NEWS
By John Fritze | May 1, 2008
Three members of the Baltimore City Council yesterday agreed to sign a boycott commitment against a downtown hotel that has been involved in a long-standing battle with the union representing its employees. City Council Vice President Edward L. Reisinger and city Councilmen Bill Henry and William H. Cole IV were expected to sign boycott pledge cards against the Sheraton Baltimore City Center because of the labor dispute. This month marked two years that doormen, housekeepers and other staff have worked without a contract, according to United Here.
NEWS
May 2, 2000
Mount Airy voters elected three councilmen yesterday to serve terms into 2004. Four candidates sought three open seats on the five-member council. Elected were incumbent David W. Pyatt, 57, a nuclear engineer for the Department of Energy in Germantown; incumbent William E. Wagner Jr., 60, co-owner of Wagner Bros./Mount Airy Locker Co.; and Franklin M. Johnson, 38, a Rockville attorney. Voting was from 11 a.m. until 8 p.m. yesterday at Mount Airy Volunteer Fire Company Activities Building on Twin Arch Road.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | July 12, 1995
Another article Wednesday should have stated that an incident in which bottles and batteries were thrown at Councilmen Lawrence A. Bell III and Martin O'Malley occurred at the intersection of Park Heights and Belvedere avenues.The Sun regrets the error.Baltimore City Councilmen Lawrence A. Bell III and Martin O'Malley made a late-night tour of Park Heights Avenue yesterday in an effort to document the need for a curfew.They got a graphic demonstration of the kind of thing that convinces them one is needed when a group of youths threw batteries and soda bottles at them.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2001
Six Baltimore County councilmen introduced a resolution last night calling for a commission to study council redistricting, a process in which they faced strong criticism last spring from community groups who believed there wasn't enough public input. Council Chairman Stephen G. Samuel Moxley, a Catonsville Democrat, said the commission will be appointed next month and will likely include community activists and former elected officials. The resolution sets a target of May 1 for the commission to make its report, potentially allowing amendments to the county's charter to be on the November ballot.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Anne Arundel Bureau of The Sun | July 27, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Citing community pressure, two companies have decided to withdraw their request for commercial licenses that would have allowed them to install video peep shows in their Anne Arundel County stores.Timothy F. Umbreit, an attorney for the two companies, said yesterday that he will be sending county councilmen letters of his clients' intentions.The companies, Magura and Tokai enterprises, had initially sought to install the video machines in stores in Glen Burnie and in Odenton.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2000
Two of three incumbent councilmen say they'll be on the ballot May 1, when Mount Airy holds its municipal election for three Town Council seats. However, the hours for voting will be shortened, the council decided Monday night. The new times will be 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Previously, voting began at 9 a.m., but Mayor Gerald R. Johnson said little demand existed during the first two hours. A meeting is scheduled at 7: 30 p.m. Monday at Mount Airy Town Hall to allow candidates to place their names in nomination.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Anne Arundel County Council members are pressing for a 10 percent increase in the county's police force. Councilman Derek Fink says he'll introduce a resolution Monday encouraging the county executive to add 5 percent more officers in each of the next two years. He said he's lined up Councilman Richard Ladd and Council Chairman John Grasso as co-sponsors. Four votes are needed for a measure to pass. “I think it's important to get more officers in the county, especially as we're seeing more drugs, including heroin, and all the crimes associated with that such as precious-metal thefts and breaking and entering,” said Fink, a Pasadena Republican.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2013
Two Baltimore City Councilmen are formally calling on the state of Maryland to cover the costs of erroneous historic property tax credits that have cut revenue to the city over the past several years. Councilmen Bill Henry, who represents north Baltimore, and James Kraft, who represents southeast Baltimore, plan to introduce a resolution Monday that will call on the state to "find an appropriate mechanism whereby the city of Baltimore can be compensated for lost property tax revenue, so as not to negatively impact blameless homeowners and not unduly burden the city's finances because of flawed calculations used by the state.
NEWS
March 1, 2013
Regarding the recent arrest of Baltimore County Councilman Todd Huff on DUI charges, why does a part-time councilman warrant an automobile at the people's expense ("After arrest, Huff to give up county car," Feb. 26)? And why did it have to be a Jeep Grand Cherokee at a likely cost of over $30,000? Do county councilmen also get free fuel, maintenance and insurance? And why was Mr. Huff even driving this vehicle in the early morning hours? It seems to me that if councilmen are in such need of vehicles at taxpayers' expense they should at least confine their use of them to county business.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Two Anne Arundel County lawmakers want to protect millions in expected gambling money from being spent in neighborhoods away from the state's largest casino. Their proposed bill would siphon Anne Arundel's local impact grants, which are estimated to total $117 million over the next five years, into a separate account dedicated to improvements near Arundel Mills mall. "I'm trying to hold ourselves to a standard so we can say to the public that we got this money, and this is what we spent it on," said Councilman Peter I. Smith, a Democrat from Severn whose district includes Maryland Live Casino in Hanover.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
Deliberate misbehavior by Anne Arundel County employees could leave them on the hook for the county's legal costs under a new bill introduced Monday night. The legislation requires the county attorney to try to recoup from employees whose conduct ultimately put Anne Arundel's government on the losing end of a lawsuit. A second bill introduced Monday night gives the County Council final approval on any out-of-court settlements over $100,000. The bills are reactions to two pending federal lawsuits against the county filed over the conduct of County Executive John R. Leopold, the bills' sponsors said.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
Anne Arundel County employees whose deliberate behavior leads to legal settlements or judgments against the county could be ordered to cut a check for the damages under a bill to be introduced Monday before the County Council. One proposal would allow the county attorney to pursue the recovery of damages from an employee in such cases. Another bill to be introduced Monday would allow the council to approve large legal settlements. The bills — sparked by two pending civil lawsuits against County Executive John R. Leopold and the county — have the sponsorship of Jamie Benoit, a Crownsville Democrat, and Jerry Walker, a Gambrills Republican.
NEWS
By Ronnie Greene and Larry Carson and Ronnie Greene and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
Imagine this: Politicians saying no to campaign contributions.In Baltimore County, where the memory of scandal lingers in the halls of government -- with portraits of two disgraced former county executives hanging on the wall -- the current crop of council members is taking pains to avoid any hint of influence-peddling.Mindful of past ethical uproars over rezoning, most councilmen declined to hold fund-raisers this year amid the countywide rezoning.The one who did hold a fund-raiser during the rezoning process, Douglas B. Riley of Towson, returned more than $3,000 from people seeking zoning changes.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1997
Although most of Baltimore County's seven councilmen abstained from campaign fund raising last year during the quadrennial comprehensive rezoning process, they are making up for it now -- but the link to their zoning work remains.Councilman Vincent J. Gardina, a Perry Hall Democrat and former council chairman, said he hopes that many of the $100 tickets to his May 1 fund-raiser will be bought by people he helped last year with zoning changes they requested, or by business owners who support him.The council made hundreds of decisions on zoning changes in October.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 3, 2012
Two Harford County Council members are calling for a state investigator to examine circumstances surrounding the proposed transfer station in Joppa, including the county's move away from the waste to energy facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground. At Tuesday's Harford County Council meeting, Councilmen Dion Guthrie and Joe Woods defended their comments to The Aegis last week that Aberdeen Proving Ground garrison commander Col. Orlando Ortiz said it was the county that pulled out of a waste disposal agreement, not APG. Woods said he went into last week's meeting with Guthrie and Ortiz fully prepared to accuse the Army of not being a good neighbor, only to find out it was the county that was not a good neighbor.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2011
The head of a Baltimore County public employees union says workers are outraged over the lucrative pension deals of County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and former councilmen Sam Moxley and Vince Gardina. An amendment to a 2010 pension reform law allowed employees, including the three men, to return to work for the county and accrue new pension benefits while earning their salary. The overall package reduced government workers' pension benefits. "General county employees have all made great sacrifices to help ensure the health stability of the county, not to just go into someone else's pockets," John Ripley, president of the Baltimore County Federation of Public Employees, said this week.
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