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By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2003
After almost a year of planning by its members, an umbrella council that includes the Carroll commissioners and representatives from the county's eight municipalities is scheduled to meet for the first time this week. Town leaders said that although the council will not make policy, it will allow them to reach consensus on issues that affect the entire county. "I think it will give us the ability to find out what we agree on and give us more power to put those ideas out for the public and the county government," said Jeannie Nichols, a Sykesville councilwoman and co-chair of the council.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2003
When an umbrella group that includes county and town officials meets tonight, Carroll's response to Tropical Storm Isabel will figure into a discussion on emergency services and crisis preparation. The Carroll County Council of Governments will be introduced to Bill Martin, Carroll's new emergency management coordinator. Council members also will review municipal emergency plans with Howard Redman Jr., director of the Office of Public Safety. "We will see Bill Martin's plan for Carroll and where the towns fit into it," said Frank Johnson, a former Mount Airy council president who helped establish the council and is now special assistant to Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge.
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NEWS
May 16, 1991
In science and industry, new technologies and new methods constantly replace old ones. Contrast that with governments, which are endlessly studying the same issues. Problems do not get resolved because political will is lacking. A case in point: jurisdictional cooperation in the Baltimore region.In 1963, a blue-ribbon commission made two recommendations "to prepare the way toward metropolitan government in the Baltimore area." After much political haggling, legislators in Annapolis agreed to create a joint metropolitan planning organization known today as the Baltimore Regional Council of Governments.
NEWS
September 28, 2003
Food stamps increased for Isabel victims The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food and Nutrition Service office has given Maryland approval to distribute additional food stamps to victims of Hurricane Isabel in 14 counties, including Carroll, where at least 60 percent of the population was affected by power outages. Food-stamp recipients will automatically have their September electronic benefits transfers increased by 50 percent. Clients do not need to call or visit a local office to receive the additional benefit.
NEWS
May 28, 1991
Negotiating Baltimore's Howard Street is no easy feat these days because of light-rail construction. But if you are in the vicinity, take a look at the old Greyhound bus terminal. The 1940s building is being transformed into a handsome headquarters complex for the Baltimore Regional Council of Governments.There is another reason to see it as well. An exhibit of contemporary Soviet photography is on view until June 21 in what used to be the terminal's service shed. That site "provides an appropriate parallel to the space being used by Soviet artists at work today," according to the exhibit's sponsors.
NEWS
September 28, 2003
Food stamps increased for Isabel victims The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food and Nutrition Service office has given Maryland approval to distribute additional food stamps to victims of Hurricane Isabel in 14 counties, including Carroll, where at least 60 percent of the population was affected by power outages. Food-stamp recipients will automatically have their September electronic benefits transfers increased by 50 percent. Clients do not need to call or visit a local office to receive the additional benefit.
NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | June 6, 1991
JUST WHEN folks are getting comfortable with the notion that a regional approach to government is the last great hope for Baltimore city, the Schaefer administration and the General Assembly are quietly considering withdrawing state support of the Regional Council of Governments.And if the state retreat happens, chances are that local government members will cut back their subsidies, too, thus ending the council (formerly the Regional Planning Council) as it now exists. All this is happening backstage as the council is preparing to move into its spiffy new headquarters, the refurbished Greyhound station on Howard Street.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2002
Town officials in Carroll are pressing ahead with the creation of a council of governments that would work directly with the county commissioners on regional issues such as transportation, development and education. A three-member committee has drafted bylaws defining the council's mission, its principal representatives and how and when it will conduct meetings. "The purpose of the council shall be to create a forum in which the appropriate governments ... can come together to encourage an approach to managing growth and providing public services which are comprehensive and countywide, yet sensitive to the needs of regions, municipalities and communities," the draft bylaws say. In addition to the mayors and town council members from Carroll's eight towns, the council will include the county commissioners and a state planner, and representatives from the school board and police, fire and emergency services agencies.
NEWS
By Guy W. Hager | June 28, 1991
FRANK A. DeFilippo' assessment of the Baltimore Regiona Council of Governments as a "top-heavy bureaucracy that's spending nearly $10 million a year to produce very little the public can actually see," demands response both in terms of fairness and accuracy, particularity when he poses the question: "Do we really need the Baltimore Regional Council of Governments?" (Other Voices, June 6).The regional council has an operating budget of $2.6 million and employs 43 people. While we do manage a total budget of $9.1 LTC million, $6.5 million is for federal pass-through programs for regional housing assistance and for transportation planning which assures the region's eligibility for federal transportation funding.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2003
When an umbrella group that includes county and town officials meets tonight, Carroll's response to Tropical Storm Isabel will figure into a discussion on emergency services and crisis preparation. The Carroll County Council of Governments will be introduced to Bill Martin, Carroll's new emergency management coordinator. Council members also will review municipal emergency plans with Howard Redman Jr., director of the Office of Public Safety. "We will see Bill Martin's plan for Carroll and where the towns fit into it," said Frank Johnson, a former Mount Airy council president who helped establish the council and is now special assistant to Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2003
After almost a year of planning by its members, an umbrella council that includes the Carroll commissioners and representatives from the county's eight municipalities is scheduled to meet for the first time this week. Town leaders said that although the council will not make policy, it will allow them to reach consensus on issues that affect the entire county. "I think it will give us the ability to find out what we agree on and give us more power to put those ideas out for the public and the county government," said Jeannie Nichols, a Sykesville councilwoman and co-chair of the council.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2003
Even as the Freedom Area Citizens Council takes a bigger role in county government, it faces criticism from the community's Old Guard. The council, formed five years ago as a liaison between South Carroll residents and county officials, played a key role in the 2002 commissioner elections. And it soon will have a nonvoting seat on the new Carroll County Council of Governments. Tonight, at a joint meeting, FACC and the county commissioners are scheduled to discuss other key issues, including community relations and road improvements.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2002
Town officials in Carroll are pressing ahead with the creation of a council of governments that would work directly with the county commissioners on regional issues such as transportation, development and education. A three-member committee has drafted bylaws defining the council's mission, its principal representatives and how and when it will conduct meetings. "The purpose of the council shall be to create a forum in which the appropriate governments ... can come together to encourage an approach to managing growth and providing public services which are comprehensive and countywide, yet sensitive to the needs of regions, municipalities and communities," the draft bylaws say. In addition to the mayors and town council members from Carroll's eight towns, the council will include the county commissioners and a state planner, and representatives from the school board and police, fire and emergency services agencies.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | February 17, 1995
A "gentleman's disagreement" between the state retirement system and the Baltimore Metropolitan Council has landed in the House of Delegates Appropriations Committee.On one side, the Maryland State Retirement and Pension System says the council owes the agency about $650,000 to help make up a shortfall in contributions to the system dating to before 1992.But the council, which was formed from the Baltimore Regional Council of Governments in 1992, says the legislation that created it absolved the nonprofit group from the debts of its predecessor.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
County Executive Robert R. Neall has been elected chairman of the newly formed Baltimore Metropolitan Council, an agency created in the last legislative session to replace the Regional Council of Governments and spawn regional cooperation.Neall was elected Monday night at a meeting of elected officials from jurisdictions that will provide financial support for the group: Baltimore City and Baltimore, Anne Arundel, Howard, Harford and Carroll counties.Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke was elected vice chairman.
NEWS
May 13, 1992
After 28 years of operation under various names -- the longest as the Regional Planning Council -- the state-financed Baltimore Regional Council of Governments will bow out June 30. Under legislation recently signed by Gov. William Donald Schaefer, the non-profit Baltimore Metropolitan Council will come into existence. It will assume much of the previous council's staff and duties.A federal law requires that each urban area have a "metropolitan planning organization" as a prerequisite for funding.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Tom Bowman Sandy Banisky of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this report | November 22, 1991
The Baltimore Regional Council of Governments, which for nearly 30 years has offered research and technical assistance to local governments, is ineffective and should be "downsized" to a forum of local elected officials to discuss mutual concerns, according to a report.The council "is not perceived as being an effective instrument" for bringing about regional cooperation in the Baltimore Metropolitan area, said the summary of the 111-page report, completed by the Schaefer Center for Public Policy at the University of Baltimore under contract with the Maryland Office of Planning.
NEWS
May 11, 1992
Will the Baltimore region wage "trash wars" in the 1990s?This is a serious question. Over the past years, several suburban counties have adopted policies to bar the import of solid waste from outside their own boundaries. The city is now retaliating. "We need to do likewise," says City Council President Mary Pat Clarke. She has introduced legislation that would block disposal at the Quarantine landfill of trash, ash and other solid waste originating outside the city.The city and the counties are driven by the same motives.
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