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Letter to The Record and The Aegis | May 7, 2014
Editor: I congratulate and thank Councilman Bill Martin, Councilman David Glenn and Bob Robinson. It was a pleasure to campaign along-side three very passionate and respectful gentlemen. I would like to personally thank every resident who came to the polls and exercised their right to vote on May 6. I appreciate your support and am humbled to represent and advocate for the citizens and our City once again. I am excited to start what I believe will be a very productive council term, and look forward to working with the mayor, administration and especially my fellow councilmembers.
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NEWS
Letter to The Record and The Aegis | May 7, 2014
Editor: I congratulate and thank Councilman Bill Martin, Councilman David Glenn and Bob Robinson. It was a pleasure to campaign along-side three very passionate and respectful gentlemen. I would like to personally thank every resident who came to the polls and exercised their right to vote on May 6. I appreciate your support and am humbled to represent and advocate for the citizens and our City once again. I am excited to start what I believe will be a very productive council term, and look forward to working with the mayor, administration and especially my fellow councilmembers.
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NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Staff writer | May 15, 1991
The outcome of Monday's City Council election raises nearly as many questions as it resolves.What will become of the controversial $5.3 million budget and property-tax rate the current council passed Monday night?Will mayoral powers removed by the council be restored? What willresult from the upcoming reshuffling of council committees? What isthe future of the city manager post? Who will be the next council president?And, of course, how will the tumultuous relationship between the council and Mayor W. Benjamin Brown be transformed when new members are sworn in?
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | November 6, 2013
Though they faced a challenge, the five incumbents running as a ticket under the name Team Laurel were all re-elected to serve two-year terms on the Laurel City Council, based on the election night unofficial count Tuesday. Incumbents Michael Leszcz, who was running for re-election to the at-large seat; Valerie Nicholas and H. Edward Ricks, both of Ward 1; and Donna Crary and Frederick Smalls of Ward 2 were re-elected by a comfortable margin, likely rendering totals from absentee and provisional ballots inconsequential.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1997
Annapolis Alderman Wayne C. Turner announced yesterday that he is dropping out of the race for city council from Ward 6, stunning colleagues and creating even more confusion in a council election already in disarray.The move leaves the aldermanic race wide open for his Republican challenger, political neophyte Telia R. Brown, because no Democrats are running in his ward.It also means there will be at least six new faces on the nine-member council after the election. There also are no incumbents running in wards 2, 4, 5 and 7, and the city charter prohibits Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins from seeking a third term.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | September 10, 1993
Manchester Mayor Earl A.J. "Tim" Warehime Jr. was in error when he said Tuesday that council practice has been to appoint the runner-up in the most recent council election to fill a midterm vacancy.None of the last five people appointed to fill midterm vacancies on the Manchester Town Council was a candidate in the general election preceding the appointment, town records show.Mr. Warehime was runner-up in the 1987 mayoral race, the last election held before he was appointed mayor in November 1990 to replace Elmer C. Lippy Jr. when Mr. Lippy became a Carroll County Commissioner.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | March 18, 1993
The first candidate to enter the Hampstead Town Council race is Jacqueline Hyatt, who filed her candidacy March 11, Town Clerk Pat Warner said."No sense waiting until the last minute," said Ms. Hyatt. "I really do want to run again. . . . I think I make a difference."She said the projects on which she has made a difference include the Northeast Tourist Bureau; the Hampstead swimming pool; the town tree commission; the council's parks and recreation committee; and the effort to preserve the Hampstead train station.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | April 13, 1993
James Piet and David Hopkins declared themselves candidates yesterday for the May 11 Hampstead Town Council election, bringing the number of candidates to eight.Mr. Piet is director of site evaluation and development for Masonry Contractors Inc."I think it's a community I'm going to stay in for a while," he said, "and I think it's important to try to make a difference."He said, "I think my background would be a positive influence" on the council, because of his familiarity with zoning and development issues.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | May 16, 1993
In Sunday's Howard section, an article about the Columbia zTC Council election incorrectly described who the Long Reach election committee said should take responsibility for the April 24 vote. The committee said the "conduct of this election . . . is the responsibility of the" Long Reach Community Association.The Sun regrets the errors.Two Columbia Council candidates who both claimed victorin the recent election may be forced into a rematch, unless legal maneuvering scuttles a plan announced Friday night.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2000
The mayor of Manchester is among the lowest paid in the county, but a proposed change to the town code would quadruple the salary after the next election, while more than doubling the amount paid to Town Council members. The salary increases are among several proposed changes to the town code that were read at this month's council meeting and will be subject to a public hearing at the next regular council meeting, at 7: 30 p.m. Feb. 8. Other ordinance changes would: Provide for filling mayor or Town Council vacancies by appointment.
NEWS
October 31, 2013
The federal shutdown this fall was a tough lesson in how coming to agreement is important to getting things done. When the five City Council incumbents answered questions at the Laurel Board of Trade's public candidates forum last week, their answers were nearly always made in agreement with one another. And while it would have been nice to hear what they didn't agree on, they have found enough common ground to effectively govern the city as a council in the last two years. The council successfully attracted a developer to replace the nearly empty Laurel Mall; enhanced pedestrian safety through improving crosswalks such as the one for residents of Selbourn House; has worked with the business community and created incentives for new business to come to Main Street; and has proposed lowering property taxes as the city receives expected new revenue from developments that are in the works.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
The Annapolis city council is rushing to finish business on a number of weighty issues before city elections Nov. 5, including adoption of the controversial new master plan for downtown's City Dock. By Mayor Josh Cohen's count, the city council has had more than 16 hours of meetings devoted to review and revision of the plan during multiple sessions in October. A reworked plan will be the focus of a public hearing Monday night, with a potential vote scheduled for Oct. 28. "I think the changes we've made are responsible, and they're responsive to the public input we've heard," Cohen said.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
Baltimore County Council members on Monday unanimously elected Councilman Tom Quirk as their chairman, and the Catonsville Democrat pledged to collaborate with County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and work to make local government cost-effective. Quirk, 43, was elected to the council in 2010. He is a financial planner in the private sector and has chaired the county's Spending Affordability Committee. His council colleagues often turn to him for guidance on budget issues. He gained widespread attention last year when he successfully sponsored controversial legislation to protect transgender people from discrimination.
EXPLORE
May 22, 2011
FINKSBURG — The Finksburg Planning and Community Council will host elections and an update of its by-laws at its Thursday, May 26, meeting, at 7 p.m. at Finksburg Library, Old Westminster Pike. Candidates are: secretary, Chris Gayo; treasurer, Alice Altstatt; members at-large, Gary Kerns, Matt Tiahrt, Michael Davis and Frank Lago. Also, by-law changes will be voted on at the meeting. A copy of the proposed by-laws is available at Finksburg.org. Jim Joyner
NEWS
February 17, 2011
Harford County Democrats are complaining because they have been shut out from the panel that will draw County Council district lines using new census data, an exercise they fear will allow Republicans to gerrymander them into oblivion. But the situation is their own fault. A provision of the charter designed to keep small political parties from unduly influencing the process says that to get a seat on the committee, a party must receive at least 15 percent of the total votes cast in the most recent council election.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
As Harford County begins its redistricting, a legal provision aimed at limiting the influence of small, single-issue parties is being applied to Democrats, who make up nearly half of the county's registered voters. Democrats, who have seen their power steadily decline in recent county elections — and fielded few candidates last year — are now considered a fringe group under redistricting law. Tuesday night, the Republican-dominated County Council shut them out of the committee that will shape council districts for the next decade.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | September 8, 1993
Manchester Town Councilman Robert C. Kolodziejski has resigned, saying he does not have enough time to devote to council business.He tendered his resignation in an Aug. 19 letter to Mayor Earl A. J. "Tim" Warehime Jr."It's a part-time position, but it takes a full-time effort. I can't give it that full-time effort right now," Mr. Kolodziejski said yesterday."I tried to talk him out of it," Mr. Warehime said. "I just wish he would reconsider. He's done a good job, and we're kind of in the middle of a lot of things."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
As Harford County begins its redistricting, a legal provision aimed at limiting the influence of small, single-issue parties is being applied to Democrats, who make up nearly half of the county's registered voters. Democrats, who have seen their power steadily decline in recent county elections — and fielded few candidates last year — are now considered a fringe group under redistricting law. Tuesday night, the Republican-dominated County Council shut them out of the committee that will shape council districts for the next decade.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | May 3, 2009
In response to the schools superintendent's recent decision not to allow the 2009 city elections to be held in schools, the Annapolis City Council discussed at length Monday night where to hold the elections that will determine the city's next mayor. In a letter dated April 15, Anne Arundel County Public Schools Superintendent Kevin M. Maxwell wrote to Mayor Ellen Moyer that having city elections on a school day would "interfere with our activities and our sessions," despite the fact that schools had been used for decades.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | January 23, 2007
The Baltimore City Council elected Stephanie C. Rawlings Blake as president and Robert W. Curran as vice president yesterday, in the last of the domino moves in local government resulting from Martin O'Malley's ascension to the governor's office. Both choices had been expected and were approved unanimously, ushering in an 11-month term in which Rawlings Blake and Mayor Sheila Dixon will attempt to advance their agenda amid an increasingly political atmosphere at City Hall. "It will be a difficult year for us, and it will be harder still to ignore the fact that this is a very political year," said Rawlings Blake, 36. "But we have an obligation to ensure that our daily focus is not on politics but on the well-being and the needs of the people of Baltimore."
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