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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2010
The sale of chemically-treated herbs that mimic the effects of marijuana when smoked would be banned in Baltimore City under a measure proposed by a West Baltimore city councilwoman. The herbs, sold under the branch names "K2" and "Spice" are available in shops that sell smoking accessories. They are marketed as a form of incense and are sold for as much as $20 a gram — far higher than the street value of marijuana. The synthetic chemical that coats the leaves has an effect 10 to 15 times stronger than marijuana, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.
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NEWS
Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake says she is throwing her support behind City Councilman William "Pete" Welch's bill calling for a large tax break for urban farmers in Baltimore. In legislation pending in a City Council committee, Welch is seeking a 90 percent break on property taxes for urban farmers who grow and sell at least $5,000 of fruit and vegetables a year. The credits, which must be approved by the city's Cffice of Sustainability, are good for five years, but can be renewed for a total of 10 years, according to the bill.
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NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | January 5, 1992
Harford's economic development director didn't violate financial disclosure laws last summer by failing to list $207,000 in lien judgments against him on a financial statement.But such disclosures wouldbe required in the future, if a new ethics law proposed by the County Council president, Jeffrey D. Wilson, is adopted.Wilson circulated a draft bill among county officials for their comment last week, but has not formally introduced the legislation to the council for consideration.Wilson's proposal also would changethe definition of family listed in the ethics law, said James Vannoy, legislative aide to the council.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
For more than two decades, residents of western Anne Arundel County have fought against proposed rubble landfills that they say would bring traffic, dust and noise to their community. Now their hopes rest with the fate of a bill before the County Council that would ban such landfills from residential zones, instead relegating them to industrial areas. Several members of the County Council seemed eager to pass the bill at their last meeting, but the county's top lawyer cautioned that such a change to zoning rules comes with the risk of lawsuits.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | March 14, 2009
A City Council bill that seeks to slow foreclosures in Baltimore violates the state and federal constitutions, according to an opinion issued yesterday by the city's law department. The legislation, introduced by Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke and Councilman Bill Henry, would extend the time between foreclosure and eviction from 14 days to 365 days. The lawmakers believe that the bill would provide a strong incentive for lenders to negotiate with owners rather than foreclose. But the unfavorable legal opinion could halt momentum on the bill because, Mayor Sheila Dixon's spokesman said, it would prevent her from signing it. "Our legal department has found that this legislation is not in accordance with state and federal law," said Scott Peterson, Dixon's spokesman.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | April 10, 2008
The city's two fire unions plan to oppose a City Council bill filed this week to name a fire station after former department Chief William J. Goodwin Jr. The legislation would rename Engine Company 41 on South Conkling Street after the former chief because he "served the city of Baltimore with distinction and honor for over 30 years," according to the bill sponsored by Councilman Nicholas C. D'Adamo Jr. The station is where Goodwin started his career,...
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1995
The mayor and the 19-member Baltimore City Council could be in line for a hefty pay raise, the first since 1987 and one aimed at keeping city elected officials on a pace with surrounding counties.A bill was introduced last night in the City Council, detailing pay increases for all elected officials, including the comptroller. Salaries would jump by 33 percent for the mayor and by 29 percent for the council members and comptroller, beginning in December.The bill asks that the mayor's salary be raised by $20,000, giving him $80,000.
EXPLORE
September 6, 2012
Editor: County Executive David Craig's claim that he opposes the planned Walmart on Route 924 but can't do anything about it rings somewhat hollow to those familiar with his past dealing with developers. When Ryan Homes was told by the Development Advisory Committee that the Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance would not allow them to proceed with a large condominium and town home project at Monmouth Meadows (see DAC meeting minutes, 11/03/10, 5/4/11), they confidently continued to sell the condo units.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1998
In another step toward the buyout of 94 properties in the Wagner's Point section of Baltimore, the city's Planning Commission has endorsed a City Council bill that would allow the purchase as part of an effort to expand a sewage plant.The commission's endorsement Thursday night was one of several hurdles the measure must clear. The City Council bill must be reviewed and approved by the council and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who introduced the bill two weeks ago.Schmoke wants the city to buy the properties in Wagner's Point by negotiated settlement or by eminent domain, in which the city would take the properties after compensating the owners.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | March 28, 2007
A bill designed to limit property tax cuts granted older Howard County homeowners appears to have majority support on the County Council after a vigorous debate of the issue. Although amendments are likely before the April 4 vote, the idea of aiming the tax cut at seniors with lower incomes and fewer assets, while limiting the county's revenue loss, seems to have backing from at least three of the five council members. The law they want to change gives seniors 70 and older with annual incomes less than $75,000 a 25 percent county property tax cut and freezes their annual bill.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
The Anne Arundel County Council killed a bill Monday night that would have set up a special fund for construction projects - including the possibility of funding another public high school. By a 3-4 vote, the council defeated a bill from Councilman Jamie Benoit, who offered the measure as a way to raise money for a 13th public high school in the Crofton area - a proposal that so far has gone unfunded by the county and state, despite pleas from parents in the western part of the county.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
The Baltimore County Council approved legislation Monday requiring coaches and other recreation volunteers who work with children to undergo background checks, a move officials said is meant to protect children from sexual predators. The county is the only jurisdiction in the Baltimore region that does not run background checks on volunteers for government-sponsored recreational activities. Council members passed the measure unanimously, giving county officials until July 2015 to work out details of a policy on the checks.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | December 19, 2013
Legislation that clarifies Baltimore County's food truck regulations was introduced to the Baltimore County Council Monday night, and if passed, would allow the popular mobile vendors to continue to cater to the downtown Towson business crowd. "Food trucks are an important part of the diversity of choices in Downtown Towson," Councilman David Marks, who introduced the bill, said Monday in a statement. "They offer quick food for people who want faster service. They can exist side by side with sit-down restaurants, but should not crowd out those restaurants.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Fines for animal cruelty in Baltimore County will increase under a bill approved by the County Council on Monday. The penalties for first offenses will rise from $100 to $250 per day for each occurrence of animal cruelty. Initially, the legislation proposed by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz would have increased the fines to $145, but an amendment proposed by council members raised the penalty even higher. That better reflects the severity of the crime, said Councilman David Marks, a Perry Hall Republican.
EXPLORE
October 2, 2013
The Harford County Council introduced Harford County Executive David Craig's bill Tuesday night to repeal the state's storm water remediation fee, known as the "rain tax," in Harford County.  Craig announced earlier this month he wanted to repeal the state bill and has regularly challenged the state to prove the fee would actually improve the Chesapeake Bay, as well as accused the government of needing to clean up its own house, environmentally speaking. The bill would return any fees of $50 or less to taxpayers and would provide that no storm water remediation fees will be charged or collected in Harford County.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
In a unanimous vote, the City Council gave preliminary approval Monday to a bill that would require businesses getting large city contracts or financial support to hire 51 percent of new workers from Baltimore. "My council colleagues believe this is a fair thing to do," Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young, the bill's lead sponsor, said after the vote. "We have an unemployment rate of 9.6 percent. We need to get Baltimore City to work. There are qualified people in this city that can do these jobs.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | April 4, 2007
Howard County's older homeowners will learn tonight how much of a property tax break they will get come July. The County Council is scheduled to vote on a bill to change the tax cut approved by the previous council just days before the November election. A series of amendments that appeared to move opposing views closer together were submitted Monday by council Chairman Calvin Ball, an east Columbia Democrat, and Greg Fox, a western county Republican. The law, approved Oct. 31, calls for a 25 percent property tax cut on July's bills for homeowners 70 and older with annual incomes less than $75,000.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1995
The protesters wore suits and ties.Yes, they were Republicans, largely unaccustomed to such outdoor displays of political dissent. But they rallied outside City Hall yesterday afternoon to demonstrate against Council Bill 1306, which would raise the salaries of the all-Democratic City Council and Democratic mayor.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's salary would increase from from $60,000 a year to $95,000 under the legislation. However, the small group of protesters, armed with props, was more concerned with the 28 percent raise for the council members, to $37,000 a year from $29,000.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
A Baltimore County Councilman is seeking to restrict protesters from picketing outside of schools at certain times, saying it's a matter of protecting children's safety. Councilman Todd Huff introduced legislation Monday that would create a buffer zone of 300 feet outside school entrances where people could not picket while school is in session or within one hour before or after school. The measure would apply to both public and private schools. Violators would face up to a $1,000 fee, imprisonment of up to 90 days, or both.
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