Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCotton
IN THE NEWS

Cotton

FEATURES
By Alan Friedman and Alan Friedman,Contributing Writer | August 9, 1992
A beautiful yet disconcerting sight greets visitors approaching the low, rolling mountains that rise from the broad Lycos valley in western Turkey.The hillsides appear covered with snow, but the ridge is only a few hundred feet above the plains. The warm wind brings a thirst for water, not hot chocolate.Drawing closer, it becomes clear the ground itself is white. Stranger still, people in bathing suits are walking through pools of water that seem to jut out like frozen steps down the hillside.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1997
The Ravens went back to work with a 90-minute practice yesterday, and without question, no one was more tired at the end of the day than rookie fullback Kenyon Cotton.Taking coach Ted Marchibroda's cue regarding the needed improvement in its running game, the team worked extensively on its two-back offense yesterday. To this point, the Ravens have operated almost exclusively out of a one-back set."We're concentrating on our running game this week, and on picking up the blitz. We want to use the fullback more in our offense," Marchibroda said.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 17, 2001
BEIJING - A series of mysterious blasts ripped through buildings in the North China city of Shijiazhuang early yesterday, killing at least 18 people, according to China's official Xinhua news agency. Xinhua said one of the blasts occurred near a workers' dormitory attached to the state-owned Number Three Cotton Factory. The Information Center for Human Rights and Democracy, an independent watchdog/news agency in Hong Kong, said there were four separate explosions. It said that 170 people lived in the dormitory next to the Number Three Factory and that - 12 hours after the blast - only 28 people had been rescued.
FEATURES
By Susanne Hopkins and Susanne Hopkins,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | October 22, 1995
I told a friend I was going to Memphis."Memphis?" he said. "Isn't that where the ducks march?"It certainly is. Twice a day, in fact. But there's more to Memphis than the Peabody ducks marching down a red carpet in the venerable hotel's lobby -- although that is a most charming feature of this Tennessee town.Perched on a bluff with the Mississippi River as its front yard, this city of nearly 700,000 is a kick-back place where friendliness oozes out of its citizens like honey from a comb, and where you can spend several days discovering its curiosities.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 15, 1996
I expect a visit next year from an English cousin who is interested in seeing a cotton field in bloom. Can you tell me when and where one can visit such a field?Cotton is grown in 17 states, from Virginia to California. Planting begins as early as February, in South Texas, and as late as June, in the northern area of the Cotton Belt.Seven to nine weeks after the cotton is planted, creamy to dark yellow blossoms appear. Over the next three days, the blossoms gradually turn pink and fall off, leaving a tiny ovary attached to the plant.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
Last Tuesday, Linda Cotton listened intently when the doctor who handed her a 10-day supply of antibiotic, Cipro, warned of possible side effects. Hours after taking her first pill, she knew exactly what he was talking about. First came splitting headaches, then nausea and a nagging irritability that hasn't yet quit. "This drug isn't easy," said Cotton, who is toughing out what she hopes will be just three more days of treatment. "But you pretty much do whatever it takes to make sure you're safe - that goes without question."
FEATURES
May 15, 1991
Sarah Fleischer has been an on-air radio personality at 98 Rock since its inception 14 years ago and has worked every shift, but the morning drive. (These days you can hear her from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.) She has been married to attorney Robert Sellers for 13 years and they have two children, ages 3 and 5.How would you describe your taste in clothing?I'm schizophrenic about clothes. What I wear depends on my mood. There are times that I'm Western or a rock and roller or sophisticated or a PTA mom. It's whatever strikes my fancy.
NEWS
November 9, 2000
Clifton Virginia Riley, 92, State Department official Clifton Virginia Riley, a former State Department official, died Monday of respiratory failure at Keswick Multi-Care Center in Roland Park. She was 92. She began her State Department career as a staff officer in the early 1940s and later served at diplomatic posts in Morocco, Greece, Kenya, Iraq, Finland and Singapore. At the time of her retirement in 1963, she was vice consul in Luxembourg. She was born in New Castle, Pa., and moved to Waverly in 1932.
FEATURES
By Pat Morgan and Pat Morgan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 24, 1991
You pick up your summertime favorites from the cleaners. Crisp cotton shirts, easy linen skirts, soft silk dresses.You slip into one of them, feeling very summery.Then you walk out into the 90-degree heat and wilt.Crisp cotton turns soggy. Drapey silk goes limp. And yes, linen is supposed to wrinkle, but isn't looking like crumpled gift wrap a bit ridiculous?The dilemma: do you opt for the cool comfort of natural fibers, or do you look presentable for the lunch meeting, the after-work drinks or the Big Date?
FEATURES
May 6, 1992
About odd jackets, gray flannel slacks, and button-down oxford-cloth shirts worn without a tie -- is this still a preferred mode of dress? I've always thought it is a classic.A: I agree. The combination you described is a widely accepted way of dressing; it is one outfit every man looks good in. For casual occasions that do not require a tie, this weekend wardrobe staple is almost never wrong. Yet, even within these limits, a great many variations present themselves as options.Jacket possibilities include: a single-breasted blue blazer or a more formal double-breasted navy wool; a camel's hair jacket; a gray houndstooth or tan tweed sports coat; a beige raw silk; a white wool-and-linen blend resort look; one of the fashion-forward draped rayon-and-wool jackets for spring; summer pastel cotton or linen blazers; narrow-striped seersuckers.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.