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Cotton

FEATURES
By Alan Friedman and Alan Friedman,Contributing Writer | August 9, 1992
A beautiful yet disconcerting sight greets visitors approaching the low, rolling mountains that rise from the broad Lycos valley in western Turkey.The hillsides appear covered with snow, but the ridge is only a few hundred feet above the plains. The warm wind brings a thirst for water, not hot chocolate.Drawing closer, it becomes clear the ground itself is white. Stranger still, people in bathing suits are walking through pools of water that seem to jut out like frozen steps down the hillside.
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SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1997
The Ravens went back to work with a 90-minute practice yesterday, and without question, no one was more tired at the end of the day than rookie fullback Kenyon Cotton.Taking coach Ted Marchibroda's cue regarding the needed improvement in its running game, the team worked extensively on its two-back offense yesterday. To this point, the Ravens have operated almost exclusively out of a one-back set."We're concentrating on our running game this week, and on picking up the blitz. We want to use the fullback more in our offense," Marchibroda said.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 17, 2001
BEIJING - A series of mysterious blasts ripped through buildings in the North China city of Shijiazhuang early yesterday, killing at least 18 people, according to China's official Xinhua news agency. Xinhua said one of the blasts occurred near a workers' dormitory attached to the state-owned Number Three Cotton Factory. The Information Center for Human Rights and Democracy, an independent watchdog/news agency in Hong Kong, said there were four separate explosions. It said that 170 people lived in the dormitory next to the Number Three Factory and that - 12 hours after the blast - only 28 people had been rescued.
FEATURES
By Susanne Hopkins and Susanne Hopkins,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | October 22, 1995
I told a friend I was going to Memphis."Memphis?" he said. "Isn't that where the ducks march?"It certainly is. Twice a day, in fact. But there's more to Memphis than the Peabody ducks marching down a red carpet in the venerable hotel's lobby -- although that is a most charming feature of this Tennessee town.Perched on a bluff with the Mississippi River as its front yard, this city of nearly 700,000 is a kick-back place where friendliness oozes out of its citizens like honey from a comb, and where you can spend several days discovering its curiosities.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 15, 1996
I expect a visit next year from an English cousin who is interested in seeing a cotton field in bloom. Can you tell me when and where one can visit such a field?Cotton is grown in 17 states, from Virginia to California. Planting begins as early as February, in South Texas, and as late as June, in the northern area of the Cotton Belt.Seven to nine weeks after the cotton is planted, creamy to dark yellow blossoms appear. Over the next three days, the blossoms gradually turn pink and fall off, leaving a tiny ovary attached to the plant.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
Last Tuesday, Linda Cotton listened intently when the doctor who handed her a 10-day supply of antibiotic, Cipro, warned of possible side effects. Hours after taking her first pill, she knew exactly what he was talking about. First came splitting headaches, then nausea and a nagging irritability that hasn't yet quit. "This drug isn't easy," said Cotton, who is toughing out what she hopes will be just three more days of treatment. "But you pretty much do whatever it takes to make sure you're safe - that goes without question."
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | November 22, 1991
As Les Deutsch, Betty Gibson and Danny Eddy make their way down the narrow stone stairs toward the gritty mill on the riverbank, they retrace the footsteps of workers from as far back as the 1820s.They are among the handful of residents of Baltimore County's last known company town, Thistle, a busy but isolated community about two miles downstream from Ellicott City on the Patapsco River.Located on a dramatic bend in the river, the scene is framed by tree-coveredhills ablaze with autumn color.
SPORTS
By GLENN GRAHAM | October 3, 2008
Meade quarterback Raymond Cotton wears No. 17, and so does the Washington Redskins' Jason Campbell. Cotton is set to go to Auburn, and Campbell had an illustrious career at the Southeastern Conference powerhouse. Both guys are 6 feet 4 - big, athletic quarterbacks with strong arms. The similarities are obvious, so I asked Cotton whether Campbell was the quarterback he most looked up to. He said: "No, he's a real good quarterback and everything, but 17 was just the number one of my coaches gave me."
FEATURES
By Pat Morgan and Pat Morgan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 24, 1991
You pick up your summertime favorites from the cleaners. Crisp cotton shirts, easy linen skirts, soft silk dresses.You slip into one of them, feeling very summery.Then you walk out into the 90-degree heat and wilt.Crisp cotton turns soggy. Drapey silk goes limp. And yes, linen is supposed to wrinkle, but isn't looking like crumpled gift wrap a bit ridiculous?The dilemma: do you opt for the cool comfort of natural fibers, or do you look presentable for the lunch meeting, the after-work drinks or the Big Date?
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1999
Israel Myers, the garment manufacturer who perfected the London Fog raincoat and golf jacket, died Sunday at North Oaks Retirement Community. He was 93 and had lived in Pikesville.His son, Jonathan Myers of Owings Mills, said his father died of old age and had been in declining health for a number of years.Israel Myers is given credit for changing the 1950s men's outerwear industry when he perfected a cotton-and-synthetic blend into a cloth that he tailored as a men's all-season topcoat. The first ads for the London Fog coat appeared in Look magazine in the mid-1950s.
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