Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCotton
IN THE NEWS

Cotton

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 5, 2006
On Friday, February 17, 2006 James Cotton of Stewartstown, PA and Ellen Womer of Baltimore, were married in a private ceremony at their home in Sparks, MD. Their loving dog Bristol was in attendance. They spent a quiet evening with friends Anne and Grant at the Worthington Tavern. Friends and family will be joining them for a formal reception on June 10.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Julekha Dash and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
The Doberman sits on the edge of a bed, oblivious of the remarkable view from the floor-to-ceiling window. Modern high-rises peep out from a dense forest dotted with palm trees and shrouded in mist. Artist Jereme Scott says his painting was inspired by a 1957 photograph in National Geographic. At 66 inches by 50 inches, “The Watcher of Suite Singapore” is the largest item on display at his store, Cotton Duck Art & Apparel, in Historic Ellicott City. The shop, which opened in March, also sells T-shirts, hoodies and tank tops Scott designed, and jewelry made by designers from the Mid-Atlantic.  Scott, 28, studied fine arts at St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia and received his master's in studio arts from Howard University.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 4, 2007
On October 1, 2007, RICHARD A. COTTON of Forest Hill, MD. Beloved husband of Catherine S. Cotton (nee Sullivan). Devoted father of Richard J. Cotton. Loving brother of Guy W. Cotton, Kathy Kane and Karen Bradshaw. Also survived by two grandchildren, Sam Cotton and Kate Cotton. A memorial service will be held at The Liriodendron, Bel Air, MD, on Monday, October 8, 2007 at 4 P.M., with a reception immediately following. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in memory of Richard A. cotton to the Upper Chesapeake Health Foundation, 520 Upper Chesapeake Drive, Suite 405, Bel Air, MD, 21014.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Joseph Decatur Barksdale, who went from the cotton fields of Mississippi where his family was sharecropping to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, where he oversaw the information technology department, died March 15 at his home in Laurel from complications from a fall. He was 79. "He loved poetry and he loved Shakespeare," said his daughter Maryn Rosenberg of Laurel. But he also loved to tell stories of growing up in the South, "chasing butterflies, learning to write his letters with a stick in the dirt, listening to his grandfather play the fiddle, or running barefoot in the cotton fields," she said.
NEWS
October 14, 1990
Services for Josephine N. Cotton, a native of Baltimor County, will be held at 2 p.m. today at St. Andrews Episcopal Church in New Castle, Maine.Mrs. Cotton, who was 85, died Oct. 7 at her home in Medomak, Maine, after a brief illness.Born in Reisterstown, she attended the Bryn Mawr School and was a graduate of Chatham Episcopal Institute in Virginia. She studied piano at the Peabody Institute, and after her debut in Baltimore she studied piano and French at the Sorbonne.She was a 1930 graduate of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing and later studied Italian in Rome.
NEWS
July 10, 2007
On July 5, 2007, BETTY B. COTTON. Frends may calll thte FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Wednesday, where family will receive friends from 5 to 7 P.M. The family will also receive friends on Thursday at Providence Baptist Church, 1407 Pennsylvania, at 10 A.M. followed by funeral service at 10:30 A.M.
NEWS
June 10, 2004
On June 7, 2004, Isaiah COTTON SR., "Shank" loving husband of Louvenia Cotton. He is also survived by daughter Betty Landrum, four grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Thursday after 9 A.M. Family will receive friends on Friday from 11 to 12 at funeral home. Followed by funeral services in New Shiloh Baptist Church, 2100 N. Monroe Street at 1 P.M. See www.marchfh.
NEWS
August 3, 2006
On Thursday, July 27, 2006, LUCILLE PEARSON COTTON; beloved wife of the late James Cotton departed this life from the Jewish Hospital Center, Cincinnati, OH. Public viewing will be Friday, August 4, 2006 from 3 to 7 P.M. at the family owned Howell Funeral Home, 4600 Liberty Heights Avenue. Services will be held on Sunday, August 6, 2006 at 4 P.M. at Mt. Nebo Holy Church, 240 Franklintown Road. Interment, Monday, August 7, 2006, 11 A.M. at Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery. She is survived by 2 daughters, Corolina Nelson and Sharon Cotton; three grandchildren, Shauna, Earl, IV and William Pinkett; three sisters, Doris Collins, Nina Ringgold and Laura Williams.
NEWS
June 16, 2004
On June 13, 2004 GLADYS MORTON, beloved mother of James A. Morton II, Dorothy Evans and Constance Stewart. She is also survived by nine grandchildren, twenty-six great grandchildren, great, great grandchildren, three sisters, Grace Lucas, Bernice Smith and Patricia Mitchell of New York and a host of other relatives. Friends may visit the JAMES A. MORTON & SONS FUNERAL HOME, INC., 1701 Laurens St., Thursday 2 to 8 P.M. Mrs. Cotton will lie instate Friday at City Temple of Baltimore (Baptist)
NEWS
By Arnold Rosenfeld | September 19, 1999
RECENTLY, the Wall Street Journal broke a curious story of such catastrophic social significance that no one could figure out why it was important. Bayer Aspirin is no longer putting plugs of cotton in its bottles.No one, according to the Journal, has much noticed. I didn't, but in my own way I'll miss those useless stoppers. They were originally put there to prevent tablets from chipping and turning into powder as they jiggled in the bottle.All the jiggling in the world wouldn't break the aspirins with the new high-tech coating.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Standing amid his $44 million refurbished textile mill, now nearing completion, developer and one-time mayoral candidate David Tufaro observed a bird wading in the Jones Falls nearby. "That's our great blue heron," Tufaro said. Water birds fly up and down the Jones Falls between the two sides of the mill, which straddles the stream. So he insisted that an image of one be included on the rooftop sign that faces Interstate 83, announcing the presence of the commercial-residential complex called Mill No. 1. When residents begin moving into the converted mill early next month, the valley between the Baltimore neighborhoods of Woodberry and Hampden will shift from being a predominantly industrial area to being an extension of the surrounding neighborhoods.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | September 16, 2012
Sagamore Farm's Charged Cotton left the starting gate as the 7-5 favorite and lived up to top billing with a rallying score in the $100,000 All Brandy Stakes for registered Maryland-bred fillies and mares at Laurel Park. The All Brandy was contested over the firm turf and included 10 starters. Horacio Karamanos was at the controls as Charged Cotton, a lightly raced daughter of Dehere, stalked the pace from fifth before swinging three wide into the stretch and overtaking front-runner Daydreamin Gracie, then held off a late surge by long shot Grant Park to win by a length and a quarter.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | July 19, 2011
College football Navy alum, Cotton Bowl hero Oldham dead at 74 Edwin W. "Ned" Oldham II, , captain of the Navy team that beat Rice in the 1958 Cotton Bowl and ended the season ranked No. 3 in the country, died June 28 in Naples, Fla. He was 74. Oldham, a 1958 graduate, scored all 14 points in the Army-Navy game his senior year. He commanded his company his final semester and percent of his graduating class and was named a Scholastic All-American. A memorial fund has been established for Oldham for the Athletic Excellence Program.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | April 1, 2011
Thousands of years of textile manufacturing have resulted in limitless options for personalizing your home with custom upholstery, window treatments, pillows, and bedding. What's important about selecting fabrics is determining which ones work in different situations. To find out what materials are best for sofas and chairs vs. windows and dining areas, I talked with a few interior designers in the region to get some expert advice. I've organized that advice into three categories: upholstery, window treatments and trends.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
Under Armour's first foray into cotton will be a $25 T-shirt that it plans to begin shipping to stores in February. The Baltimore sports apparel company built its business on performance wear geared toward the hardcore athlete, but is now developing a new venture with the material it once deemed the "enemy. " "We've built a $1 billion foundation without cotton to date," Under Armour founder Kevin Plank told analysts during a quarterly earnings conference call Thursday. "This is a whole new category for Under Armour that makes us relevant to a whole new consumer.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
Under Armour has built a brand catering to the hard-core athlete, with its tight muscle shirts and commercials that often star grunting, sweaty professional sports players. Now the Baltimore sports apparel company is introducing a cotton line that may be more appealing to those of us with softer physiques. Company Chairman and CEO Kevin Plank said the line, with the same "sweat wicking" capabilities as its other apparel, would come out next year, ending months of industry speculation.
NEWS
July 8, 2003
On July 6, 2003, LEONARD C. (Cotton) REIHL, beloved husband of Patricia Reihl, father of David C., William L. and the late Jon E. Reihl, brother of Edward (Pete) Reihl and Margaret Coleman of Rock Hall, MD. Also survived by other relatives. Friends may call at the Johnson Funeral Home, P.A., 8521 Loch Raven Blvd., (bltwy exit 29B) on Tuesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. and at Wesley Chapel Methodist Church, Rock Hall, MD on Wednesday from 11 A.M. to 12 noon, at which time services will be held.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1997
As he sat on a bench staring at the locker room floor, his face wet with tears, Kenyon Cotton spoke in a tone barely above a whisper.The sight of Ravens middle linebacker Ray Lewis, lying on the field for 45 minutes yesterday before a helicopter took him away for medical treatment, unnerved the entire team -- and no one more than Cotton.All Cotton could do was blame himself for hurting Lewis. All Cotton, a rookie free-agent fullback, could do was blame himself for endangering the career of one of most promising young players in the NFL.And Cotton could not help but think back to a tragic night from his high school days in Minden, La., a suburb of Shreveport.
TRAVEL
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
Since Tuesday, New York City has been crawling with struggling musicians — even more so than usual. By now, there are more of them around than koi at Central Park. They might even outnumber Japanese tourists. Officially, hundreds of bands have flown in from all over the world to play the annual CMJ Music Marathon and Film Festival. Unofficially, they're coming for the same reason sex columnist Ashley Alexandra Dupre left the 'burbs: To make a splash. The music marathon, in session through Sunday, is a showcase for rising bands to introduce themselves to record producers, labels and new audiences.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2010
Under Armour may launch a new line of hybrid-cotton apparel next year, according to an analyst that follows the company. The Baltimore sports apparel company is known mostly for its slick feeling, fitted compression wear. Analyst Michael Binetti, who follows Under Armour for UBS Securities LLC, in a research report released Monday described the new line of apparel as "coated cotton that wicks moisture from the skin, but still has its cotton feel." Binetti revealed the company's plans for the new line in a research note where he also announced he was upgrading the company's stock to a buy rating.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.