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SPORTS
By Pete Bielski and Pete Bielski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 14, 1999
Jockey Rick Wilson, fresh off a weeklong vacation in Myrtle Beach, S.C., said he felt revived for yesterday's races at Laurel Park. Turns out, he needed every reserve breath to prevail in the $75,000 Stefanita Stakes.With a 46-year-old jockey on her back pushing and whipping like a man half his age, the 5-year-old mare Cottage Garden surged ahead in the final strides to prevail in a six-horse blanket finish and take the winner's share of $45,000. It was a nice return to work for Wilson, who was making his debut ride aboard Cottage Garden.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2004
Tomorrow, for $25, you can see how the other half gardens in Annapolis - rain, shine or English mist. Fourteen homes, within walking distance of each other, including the home of a former U.S. senator and his wife, are opening their backyard garden gates for the fifth annual Secret Garden Tour. With lemonade and home-baked cookies served overlooking the water, amid brightly painted Victorian houses of the state capital's historic district, it makes for a civilized Sunday afternoon in June.
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SPORTS
By Bob Pickering | November 13, 1999
Today: A half-dozen stakes winners, including last year's winner, are among 10 fillies and mares entered for the 11th running of the Stefanita Stakes. The seven-furlong event, for 3-year-olds and upward, carries a $75,000 purse. Halo's Security, which went on vacation after winning the Conniver Stakes last February, won last year's edition by leading every step of the way. Other stakes winners entered include The Unforgiven, Nothing Special, Passeggiata, Cottage Garden and Tookin Down.Tomorrow: Four 2-year-old fillies will line up against unbeaten Gin Talking in the 15th running of the Heavenly Cause Stakes.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Sun Staff | April 18, 2004
I love multi-tasking, especially in plants. Plants that do two or three things at once hold special places in both my heart and my garden. Like climbing beans, which are marvelous multi-taskers. "Climbing beans are a two-fer," observes Jo-Anne Van den Berg Ohms, president of John Scheepers Kitchen Garden Seeds in Bantam, Conn. "You get quite a show and many produce delicious fruits." Of course, some are all show. For example, hyacinth beans (Dolichos lablab) have gorgeous burgundy vines, big green leaves, mauve flowers, and purple pods, yet the pods, while edible, are not palatable.
FEATURES
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | August 25, 1996
Good gardeners draw the fine line between flower beds and the rest of the garden in the most ingenious ways.Rocks, conch shells, glazed or terra-cotta tiles, low boxwood hedges, stout planks and soldierly bricks do more than enforce the decisions you've made about shape and location of flower beds. They decorate the garden, adding form, color and texture to the composition.Well-defined edges may stop a few weeds from sneaking into the flower beds, but that is not their main role.Edges are the strokes that outline our ideas and give the garden its identity.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2004
Tomorrow, for $25, you can see how the other half gardens in Annapolis - rain, shine or English mist. Fourteen homes, within walking distance of each other, including the home of a former U.S. senator and his wife, are opening their backyard garden gates for the fifth annual Secret Garden Tour. With lemonade and home-baked cookies served overlooking the water, amid brightly painted Victorian houses of the state capital's historic district, it makes for a civilized Sunday afternoon in June.
BUSINESS
By Denise Cowie and Denise Cowie,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 23, 1998
Once upon a time there was an architect whose clients wanted a traditional trophy home. Or thought they did. But as they talked, the architect asked the clients to think of the beloved spaces of their youth -- the tree house, the fort.Would they have been improved if they'd been larger?Of course not, said the clients, they'd have been spoiled.They ended up building a house half the size of the one they'd originally envisioned. And living pretty happily ever after.Another couple, also intent on a trophy home with all the trimmings, built the guest cottage first -- then moved into that and never built the main house.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | May 7, 2000
For years, seduced by the rich peace it evokes, I tried to duplicate the blowzy, rain-soaked lushness of an English cottage garden -- despite the rigorous 90-odd-degree-heat and scorched earth of our Maryland summers. Success varied with the weather, the water restrictions and my energy level. Then, a few years ago, I started to come to terms with the fact that we don't live in the Cotswolds (and that I'll never have a gardener). By both attrition and design, I began to winnow the cultivars that required coddling and to replace them with native plants.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau | September 2, 1993
GODALMING, England -- They called her Aunt Bumps, and she was the grand doyenne and genius of the modern English garden.Gertrude Jekyll was a quiet reformer. She took garden planning out of the formal drawing room and dropped it into the garden soil where it belonged, to paraphrase an old Raymond Chandler line.But she looked a most unlikely reformer, more like Queen Victoria than Rosa Luxemburg. She was a great expansive woman with plump blooming cheeks, full jowls, hair pulled back severely and weak eyes peeking through tiny oval spectacles.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Sun Staff | April 18, 2004
I love multi-tasking, especially in plants. Plants that do two or three things at once hold special places in both my heart and my garden. Like climbing beans, which are marvelous multi-taskers. "Climbing beans are a two-fer," observes Jo-Anne Van den Berg Ohms, president of John Scheepers Kitchen Garden Seeds in Bantam, Conn. "You get quite a show and many produce delicious fruits." Of course, some are all show. For example, hyacinth beans (Dolichos lablab) have gorgeous burgundy vines, big green leaves, mauve flowers, and purple pods, yet the pods, while edible, are not palatable.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | May 7, 2000
For years, seduced by the rich peace it evokes, I tried to duplicate the blowzy, rain-soaked lushness of an English cottage garden -- despite the rigorous 90-odd-degree-heat and scorched earth of our Maryland summers. Success varied with the weather, the water restrictions and my energy level. Then, a few years ago, I started to come to terms with the fact that we don't live in the Cotswolds (and that I'll never have a gardener). By both attrition and design, I began to winnow the cultivars that required coddling and to replace them with native plants.
SPORTS
By Pete Bielski and Pete Bielski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 14, 1999
Jockey Rick Wilson, fresh off a weeklong vacation in Myrtle Beach, S.C., said he felt revived for yesterday's races at Laurel Park. Turns out, he needed every reserve breath to prevail in the $75,000 Stefanita Stakes.With a 46-year-old jockey on her back pushing and whipping like a man half his age, the 5-year-old mare Cottage Garden surged ahead in the final strides to prevail in a six-horse blanket finish and take the winner's share of $45,000. It was a nice return to work for Wilson, who was making his debut ride aboard Cottage Garden.
SPORTS
By Bob Pickering | November 13, 1999
Today: A half-dozen stakes winners, including last year's winner, are among 10 fillies and mares entered for the 11th running of the Stefanita Stakes. The seven-furlong event, for 3-year-olds and upward, carries a $75,000 purse. Halo's Security, which went on vacation after winning the Conniver Stakes last February, won last year's edition by leading every step of the way. Other stakes winners entered include The Unforgiven, Nothing Special, Passeggiata, Cottage Garden and Tookin Down.Tomorrow: Four 2-year-old fillies will line up against unbeaten Gin Talking in the 15th running of the Heavenly Cause Stakes.
BUSINESS
By Denise Cowie and Denise Cowie,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 23, 1998
Once upon a time there was an architect whose clients wanted a traditional trophy home. Or thought they did. But as they talked, the architect asked the clients to think of the beloved spaces of their youth -- the tree house, the fort.Would they have been improved if they'd been larger?Of course not, said the clients, they'd have been spoiled.They ended up building a house half the size of the one they'd originally envisioned. And living pretty happily ever after.Another couple, also intent on a trophy home with all the trimmings, built the guest cottage first -- then moved into that and never built the main house.
FEATURES
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | August 25, 1996
Good gardeners draw the fine line between flower beds and the rest of the garden in the most ingenious ways.Rocks, conch shells, glazed or terra-cotta tiles, low boxwood hedges, stout planks and soldierly bricks do more than enforce the decisions you've made about shape and location of flower beds. They decorate the garden, adding form, color and texture to the composition.Well-defined edges may stop a few weeds from sneaking into the flower beds, but that is not their main role.Edges are the strokes that outline our ideas and give the garden its identity.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau | September 2, 1993
GODALMING, England -- They called her Aunt Bumps, and she was the grand doyenne and genius of the modern English garden.Gertrude Jekyll was a quiet reformer. She took garden planning out of the formal drawing room and dropped it into the garden soil where it belonged, to paraphrase an old Raymond Chandler line.But she looked a most unlikely reformer, more like Queen Victoria than Rosa Luxemburg. She was a great expansive woman with plump blooming cheeks, full jowls, hair pulled back severely and weak eyes peeking through tiny oval spectacles.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2004
John P. Donofrio, a nationally acclaimed landscape architect whose artful combinations of plants, trees, stone and natural elements created what he called "outdoor paintings," died of lung cancer Monday at the Westminster home of his daughter. He was 78 and lived in Mount Washington. Mr. Donofrio, who was born in Geneva, N.Y., was the son of an Italian immigrant father. He grew up in Westminster, where his father established Carroll Gardens, a perennial nursery, on Main Street. After graduating from Westminster High School in 1942, he studied horticulture for a year at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
July 29, 2007
It is fitting that a swing beneath an arbor occupies a prominent place in Hanna's cottage garden. Considering all the work he did to transform his small back yard into a flowering oasis, this 51-year-old manager for Verizon deserves a front-row seat from which to admire his handiwork. You can read about his efforts tomorrow at baltimoresun.com/gardener
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