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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2009
Linda Everett of Knoxville, Tenn., was looking for a recipe from the 1980s that she had misplaced. It's for a poundcake made with cottage cheese. She said it was "moist and tasty - only needed a sprinkle of powdered sugar on top to make it the perfect dessert." Nancy Simmons of Salisbury, N.C., sent in a recipe she has used for many years for a cottage-cheese poundcake. I think the best poundcakes are made with real butter, so I tested her recipe using a good-quality unsalted butter. The cake had a lovely texture and flavor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 28, 2013
Kathy Stumer from Tuscarora, Pa., was looking for a recipe that her husband's grandmother used to make and called cheese dough. She described it as pillow-like dough squares filled with cottage cheese and topped with breadcrumbs and sour cream. Linda Ziegenbein from Prineville, Ore., saw Stumer's request, which sounded to her like a description of kase knoephla, or cheese dumplings or buttons - an old-style German dish of tender noodle dough stuffed with seasoned cheese. She shared a recipe from the Kulm, N.D., Dorcas Society's 25th anniversary cookbook, circa 1971, submitted by Matilda Brost.
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FEATURES
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 17, 1995
Green Bay, Wis. -- It took two days to find Tom Monfils' body, sunk to the bottom of a giant paper mill pulp vat, a 45-pound weight around his neck. It took 2 1/2 years to charge six co-workers in his murder.When the arrests finally came last month, weary police detectives paused quietly for a beer. The Green Bay Press-Gazette put out a rare special edition. And in a tidy brick house on South Roosevelt Avenue, Joan and Edwin Monfils gave thanks that someone, at last, would have to answer for the death of their son."
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
B&O American Brasserie sous chef (and native Marylander) Matt Kane spends his days off getting down and dirty in his kitchen with his 4-year old daughter Addison. Together, they cook hearty breakfasts, like this simple but delicious vegetable-heavy Denver omelet casserole. "This is a great recipe to do with kids because it allows them to get a little messy, have fun and eat well without realizing it," says Kane. Kane takes a casual approach to cooking with kids, understanding that small hands aren't able to do everything perfectly.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | June 20, 2007
Anna Pitt of Fallston was looking for a recipe for what she thought was called a Smearcase Cheesecake. It was made with cottage cheese and had a thin layer of crust on the bottom. She thinks that the recipe came from a free recipe booklet put out by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. some years ago. Carole Wagner of Middle River still had a copy of the cookbook published by BGE called Maryland Classics, which had the recipe that Pitt was looking for in it. (The book calls it smierkase cake; in German, schmierkase means smeared cheese.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2003
Carla Brumfield of Darlington requested a low-fat tiramisu. She said she had it several years ago, lost it and "I hope someone out there has it." Catherine Rooker of Baltimore responded. "Here is a recipe I got from Cooking Light magazine several years ago," Rooker wrote. "A friend with a strong Italian background said she loved it. Since I am not a coffee drinker, I have also made this with double-strength orange juice [mix frozen concentrate with half the amount of water] and added a layer of sliced strawberries and toasted sliced almonds.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | March 29, 2000
Betty Noga of Terrebonne, Ore., wrote that she would greatly appreciate "a recipe for kooka. I'm not sure I spelled it correctly, but I enjoyed it as a child in a German friend's home." Her response came from Leila Wolf of Rapid City, S.D., who advised that the German word is kuchen, which is pronounced kooken. Mary McClelland of Rosedale wrote that she'd like a recipe for pickled hard-boiled eggs. "Hope someone out there has one. I'd be ever so grateful." Her response came from Audrey Roberts of Essex, who wrote, "I discovered this recipe when my sons were small and I had lots of Easter eggs left over.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 30, 2005
Thelma Novak of Baltimore has been searching for many years to find a recipe for cheesecake like the one her mother considered to be the best. It had somewhat unique ingredients in that it used cottage cheese, cream cheese and sour cream. Rachel Silbert from Ellicott City sent in her cheesecake recipe that she says has never failed her. It makes a traditional-tasting, rich cheesecake with a graham-cracker crust. The addition of the cottage cheese perhaps serves to make the cake somewhat less dense than other versions I have tried.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | January 24, 2007
Micky Sparks of Santa Rosa, Calif., was hoping to find a recipe for an unbaked cheesecake. It was from the early 1950s and the cooked base contained unflavored gelatin and sieved cottage cheese. Tanya Manus of Rapid City, S.D., thought she had just the recipe Sparks was looking for. It comes from a clipped advertisement she found inside one of her grandmother's old cookbooks. The advertisement for Knox gelatin describes this as "an easy-to-make, always successful no-bake cheesecake." The only tricky part of the recipe is folding in the egg whites and whipping cream.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | April 1, 1992
This spinach lasagna recipe, for Mary Smith of Millerstown, Pa., makes a nice change from more traditional tomato-based sauces. The recipe is from Cheryl Smith of Baltimore.Spinach lasagnaMakes 6 servings.2 tablespoons oil1 onion, finely chopped2 cups sliced button mushrooms1 pound frozen chopped spinach, thawed and drained1 to 2 tablespoons lemon juice1/4 teaspoon grated nutmegsalt and pepper, to taste1 cup cottage cheese1 cup grated Cheddar or mozzarella cheese2 tablespoons butter2 tablespoons all-purpose flour1 cup milk1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese1/2 pound green or white lasagna noodles, cookedHeat oven to 375 degrees.
NEWS
By Amy Landsman Linker | January 2, 2013
Reaching way back in a kitchen cabinet, I grab a jar of what's billed as orange marmalade. It's really not marmalade, just sugar glop without any orange in it at all, masquerading as the real thing. It was a "bonus" in a crate of Florida citrus we got a while back. We ate the grapefruit and oranges ages ago, but at this point it's clear no one in our family is ever going to touch that alleged marmalade. I toss it. I've been reading recently about how much food is wasted by the average American family.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
It's back-to-school time, and perhaps you are settling back in to a family-dinner routine after summer chaos. Or perhaps you at least plan to. If your picky eater isn't getting into the groove just yet, perhaps these recipes will help. Tell your kids they are eating just like the Ravens do. You won't be exaggerating. These two recipes -- for Ravens jambalaya and roasted chicken and vegetable lasagna -- come from the Classic Catering People, the caterer for Baltimore Ravens training facilities, and are actually regularly fed to the players and coaches.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2011
Kathleen Wilson from Laurel was looking for a recipe she lost during a move for what she called "lazy-day lasagna". She said the original recipe came from the back of a Mueller's pasta box some 25 years ago and was very good and easy. Donna Smith from Baltimore saw Wilson's request and said she "had to smile". She said that her mother gave her this recipe back in 1973 at her bridal shower as one of several "must-have" dishes for any new bride. Smith says that this lasagna comes together quickly and is very satisfying.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
Eris Weaver from Cotati, Calif., was looking for a recipe for a pasta salad made with salmon, peas and cottage cheese in the dressing. We had no luck locating the actual recipe, which the reader said came from a newsletter put out by Pacific Gas and Electric sometime in the mid- to late-1980s. However, it seemed like it was worth some research to try and find something similar. This is the time of year when cold pasta salads can make for a wonderful meal, and the combination sounded appetizing.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2009
Linda Everett of Knoxville, Tenn., was looking for a recipe from the 1980s that she had misplaced. It's for a poundcake made with cottage cheese. She said it was "moist and tasty - only needed a sprinkle of powdered sugar on top to make it the perfect dessert." Nancy Simmons of Salisbury, N.C., sent in a recipe she has used for many years for a cottage-cheese poundcake. I think the best poundcakes are made with real butter, so I tested her recipe using a good-quality unsalted butter. The cake had a lovely texture and flavor.
NEWS
By JENNY LIM and JENNY LIM,McClatchy-Tribune | August 5, 2007
To lose 30 pounds, Patti Lawson worked like a dog. And now, she's written a book to prove it. Lawson is author of The Dog Diet, a memoir stuffed with anecdotes about how her real-life pooch helped her lose the one around her tummy - and regain self-confidence, hope and a bit of wit in the process. The attorney-turned-writer's narrative was named "Dog Humor Book of the Year" by the Dog Writers Association of America in February. In the winter of 2002, heartbroken because of the end of a long-term romance and disillusioned with her career as a finance attorney, Lawson did what she said many people do when they're unhappy: She ate. She ate ice cream, pizza, fast food.
FEATURES
By Patricia Jamieson and Patricia Jamieson,United Feature Syndicate | August 4, 1993
The homespun goodness of freshly baked cinnamon rolls does not have to be lost when you eliminate the fat. We started out with an original recipe in which the sweet yeast dough was enriched with butter (or margarine) and eggs. We replaced a portion of the butter with pressed non-fat cottage cheese and added a small amount of vegetable oil to ensure tenderness. We also eliminated one egg yolk and used skim milk instead of whole to make a leaner dough.But it is the rich, sticky sweetness oozing from the cinnamon rolls that makes them truly memorable.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | October 14, 1992
The bounty for your kitchen this week is from the sea. Jeanne B. Romans of Baltimore requested a seafood lasagna recipe. Now she has two.Readers responded with recipes they have enjoyed for quite a while, recipes they had clipped from magazines, school and church cookbooks, newspapers or gotten from friends.Rita Roche from Baltimore sent one which, she says "was given to me by 'Laura' the cashier at the Giant store on Wilkens Avenue. We exchange recipes," she said.Chef Syglowski at the Baltimore International Culinary College, who tests the recipes, chose Laura's recipe as well as one from Mary Alice Halley of Baltimore.
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