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NEWS
October 31, 1993
For White House spin doctors, Donna Shalala's testimony that 40 percent of the American people will pay more for medical insurance under the Clinton health care plan must have been as welcome as a dose of castor oil. That the Health and Human Services secretary was being candid and merely reiterating, with minor changes, estimates presented earlier by Hillary Rodham Clinton was beside the point. Her message clearly upstaged Bill Clinton just as he came to Baltimore Thursday to begin a year-long selling job on the massive legislative proposal he had given Congress the day before.
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NEWS
August 25, 2012
Here are some questions regarding your recent article about the Maryland Health Connection ("Maryland gets federal health grant," Aug. 24): Maryland has now received $157.4 million from the federal government, but how much has Maryland spent of its own money? What is the annual budget? Rebecca Pearce is the executive director of the state's health exchange, but how employees does it have, what is the annual cost in salary and benefits and what is the cost of facilities and utilities?
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NEWS
By Peter Beilenson | March 28, 2008
In this presidential election year, health care reform is once again attracting significant attention. Polls show that health care access and cost are two of the primary domestic concerns of voters of all persuasions. Unfortunately, all of the major candidates' proposals depend, in one form or another, on continuing the most problematic aspect of our current health care system: employer-based health coverage. The involvement of employers in providing health coverage, almost unique to the United States, is an artifact of a moment in history.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 25, 2012
Seniors in Maryland have saved $56.5 million on prescription drug costs because of a provision under health care reform that has eased the Medicare donut hole, new government data has found. The savings were achieved with rebates and discounts to ease the burden of the donut hole, when patients reach certain limits that require them to pay 100 percent of their prescription drug costs. The $56.5 million in savings has occurred since health reform was adopted, according to The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | March 5, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The House of Delegates unanimously passed a bill yesterday to help small companies with the rising costs of health care.If it passes the Senate, the measure, known as "small group market reform," is likely to become the broadest health care reform effort to pass the General Assembly this year.House Bill 374 was sponsored by the entire Economic Matters Committee. Its chairman, Del. Casper R. Taylor Jr., D-Allegany, has conceded that the legislature will not be able to enact a fundamental reform this year that provides universal access to health care.
NEWS
June 19, 2005
IT SOUNDS logical that patients with health insurance would be less likely to seek unnecessary tests and treatment if they had to bear some of the cost - had "some skin in the game," as Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee put it the other day. In fact, co-pays and deductibles work well in employer-sponsored plans for middle-income workers to discourage overuse of specialists and frequent trips to the doctor's office. Erecting such barriers in Medicaid, though, as the National Governors Association recommends, would likely cost more than it would save.
NEWS
May 15, 1991
This week's call by the Journal of the American Medical Association for a massive overhaul of the health care delivery mechanism in America represents a most remarkable turnabout by the medical community. For the first time in history the AMA is committed to a plan which would in effect guarantee access by all Americans to health care as a matter of right.A little over 25 years ago a tacit compact was reached, under which it was agreed that the government would pay for the medical care of the poor and the elderly, while all others would rely upon private health insurance for that care.
NEWS
July 14, 1993
Since 1950, advances in health care have produced more improvement in human health around the world than in all the previous years. Thanks to immunizations, basic health care, the eradication or control of major diseases and other advancements, millions of people are living longer lives and, in many cases, more productive ones. In the developing world, life expectancy has risen from 40 years to 63 years.Not surprisingly, world population has risen dramatically, too, causing fears that the Earth will soon reach its carrying capacity.
NEWS
February 9, 1992
Viewed in its best light, President Bush's belated entry into the health care debate offers assurance that the nation within the next few years will finally do something about this over-arching problem. By acknowledging that the present system is in "crisis" and by asserting society's obligation to provide health care to its most disadvantaged citizens, Mr. Bush has given what the American Medical Association calls an "aura of inevitability" to what we have termed "the issue of the decade."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Congressional Budget Office said yesterday that neither consumers nor the federal government would get any short-term savings from proposals to overhaul the nation's health care system put forward by President Clinton as well as by Republican and moderate Democratic lawmakers.That conclusion, delivered by Robert D. Reischauer, director of the budget office, prompted expressions of frustration from members of Congress at a hearing of the House Ways and Means Subcommittee on Health.
NEWS
By Gene Ransom | February 9, 2012
At a time when physicians and policymakers alike are being asked to reduce health care costs without sacrificing quality care, it's crucial that we unleash the enormous potential for savings that could come from exciting new advances in health information technology. There's no better example of the revolution under way in medical care than electronic medical records and electronic prescribing systems, which not only allow doctors to generate prescriptions and orders electronically and transmit them directly, but provide instant access to drug reference information and a patient's complete medical history.
NEWS
January 4, 2010
E veryone makes mistakes. Despite their best efforts, doctors, hospitals and other health care providers make their share. So do government bureaucrats. But there's a big difference between an error and a deliberate act of fraud. Those who knowingly and deceptively create a false medical claim in order to bilk the government out of large sums of money deserve no sympathy whatsoever. That's why one of the bigger errors made by members of the Maryland General Assembly last year was to reject a bill that would have helped the state crack down on Medicaid fraud.
NEWS
By Ruth R. Faden and Madison Powers | October 30, 2008
The election is less than a week away. Health care remains a key issue for most Americans, with the declining economy serving to underscore how important it is that the next president get health care right. Considerable ink and blog space have been devoted to explicating the details and expected outcomes of Sen. Barack Obama's and Sen. John McCain's health care plans. Armed with analyses from health economists, both campaigns are peppering last-minute speeches and ads with specific figures about how much money their health care plans would save you and how much their plans would cost.
NEWS
By Peter Beilenson | March 28, 2008
In this presidential election year, health care reform is once again attracting significant attention. Polls show that health care access and cost are two of the primary domestic concerns of voters of all persuasions. Unfortunately, all of the major candidates' proposals depend, in one form or another, on continuing the most problematic aspect of our current health care system: employer-based health coverage. The involvement of employers in providing health coverage, almost unique to the United States, is an artifact of a moment in history.
BUSINESS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | February 12, 2008
Betty Ashbrook and a helpful friend recently lugged a twin bed down from an upstairs guest room into Ashbrook's dining area, making that the 64-year-old woman's new bedroom. She did so not because she was having trouble navigating the stairs, but because she was struggling to pay her rapidly rising heating bills, the most recent of which was more than $200 - a quarter of her monthly income. "I can't afford these gas bills like this," said Ashbrook, a widow. "So I brought my bed down on the first floor, so that I can pretty much live on one floor.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | February 16, 2007
In November, the staff of the Maryland Health Care Commission floated an innovative plan for health coverage - covering nearly all of the uninsured, guaranteeing generous benefits, offering substantial premium subsidies for low- to moderate-income families, and giving every insured person or family a choice of plans. While elected officials worked on more incremental plans, the commission set out to cost out its plan. Yesterday, the bill was presented: $2.5 billion a year in state funds.
BUSINESS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | February 12, 2008
Betty Ashbrook and a helpful friend recently lugged a twin bed down from an upstairs guest room into Ashbrook's dining area, making that the 64-year-old woman's new bedroom. She did so not because she was having trouble navigating the stairs, but because she was struggling to pay her rapidly rising heating bills, the most recent of which was more than $200 - a quarter of her monthly income. "I can't afford these gas bills like this," said Ashbrook, a widow. "So I brought my bed down on the first floor, so that I can pretty much live on one floor.
NEWS
By JONATHAN KARL | October 12, 1993
As Congress begins debating President Clinton's health-care plan, young Americans are running for cover. Rather than making the tough choices today, the Clinton administration proposes passing the health-care bill on to the future.Mr. Clinton made no bones about this generational rip-off when he unveiled his plan before a joint session of Congress: ''If you are a young, single person in your 20s and you are already insured, your rates may go up,'' he said. ''But I think that's fair because when the young get older, they will benefit from it.''Don't bet on it. As it now stands, the president's health-care plan is both generationally unfair and fiscally unsound.
BUSINESS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK and M. WILLIAM SALGANIK,SUN REPORTER | April 27, 2006
MinuteClinic is closing its six locations at Target outlets in the Baltimore area next month, but opening seven in nearby CVS drugstores. The shift doesn't represent a retreat for the concept of basic-care clinics in retail stores. In fact, it signals the opposite - a jockeying for position as quick clinics enter a period of rapid expansion and increased competition. "As we looked at the future, we believe strategically we will be able to grow quicker through CVS," said Michael Howe, MinuteClinic's chief executive.
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