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By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 4, 2005
Baseball movies have been very good to Kevin Costner. Well, two anyway: 1988's Bull Durham and 1989's Field of Dreams. It is doubtful Costner includes the dreadful 1982 obscurity Chasing Dreams on his resume, and 1999's For Love of the Game did not exactly hit a home run. Although his latest film, The Upside of Anger (New Line, $28) is not a baseball film, the dramedy casts Costner as a former baseball player turned sports radio host. And he gives one of his most casual, engaging performances as the charming, hard-living, hard-drinking Denny - sort of a close relative to his Crash Davis of Bull Durham - who sets his romantic sights on his neighbor (Joan Allen, in fine form)
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
Kevin Costner, a superstar for two dozen years, hasn't had a big film hit in years. But overseas and out of camera sight, he's been renewing connections with international fans — as a singer. Releasing CDs in Europe while performing on three continents, he's won a global following as a country-tinged rocker, punching out songs that fit his native-Californian, rambling-child-of-the-'60s spirit. And now he's bringing it all back home. Costner and his band, Modern West, are putting the final touches on a concept album inspired by the History Channel miniseries, "Hatfields & McCoys," a three-night dramatization of the epochal feud starring Costner as "Devil" Anse Hatfield, airing Memorial Day weekend.
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By Daniel Howard Cerone and Daniel Howard Cerone,Los Angeles Times | March 10, 1995
The word "epic" just seems to follow Kevin Costner around these days.Mr. Costner, who won an Academy Award in 1991 for directing the sprawling, three-hour "Dances With Wolves," will direct, star in and produce "The Kentucky Cycle," a six-hour HBO miniseries spanning 200 years of American history. The project was adapted by Robert Schenkkan from his own Pulitzer Prize-winning play, co-produced in 1992 by the Mark Taper Forum."In a business of superlatives, this is an amazing day in the history of television," said Bob Cooper, senior vice president of HBO Pictures, who signed off on Mr. Costner's deal Wednesday morning.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 1, 2008
The late director Sydney Pollack said the ability to relax in front of the camera is a key to great film acting. Nobody chills out for the lens better than Kevin Costner, especially when he's playing a character he calls "the American rascal," in movies like Bull Durham and Tin Cup, The Upside of Anger and the new political comedy-drama Swing Vote. When Costner fleshes out a confused man like Swing Vote's Bud Johnson - who finds himself, after a lifetime of apathy, casting the deciding vote in a presidential election - he doesn't exaggerate his awkwardness.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 1, 2008
The late director Sydney Pollack said the ability to relax in front of the camera is a key to great film acting. Nobody chills out for the lens better than Kevin Costner, especially when he's playing a character he calls "the American rascal," in movies like Bull Durham and Tin Cup, The Upside of Anger and the new political comedy-drama Swing Vote. When Costner fleshes out a confused man like Swing Vote's Bud Johnson - who finds himself, after a lifetime of apathy, casting the deciding vote in a presidential election - he doesn't exaggerate his awkwardness.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 22, 2002
Kevin Costner furrows his brow a lot in Dragonfly. His lower lip quivers tremulously. He sobs; he looks shaky; he's grief-stricken within an inch of his life. In short, he emotes. If 105 minutes of this is your idea of a good time, then be sure to catch Dragonfly. But if you're bothered by shameless emotional pandering, burdensome pacing or strained dialogue, then see what else is playing at the multiplex. And while you're at it, say a silent prayer that Costner realizes plucking away at the audience's heartstrings just isn't his forte.
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By David Kronke and David Kronke,Special to The Sun | June 24, 1994
Los Angeles -- Megastar, sex symbol, Oscar-winning director -- phooey. First and foremost Kevin Costner is a movie fan."I like Westerns too much to be in a [crummy] one," he declares, just prior to the release of "Wyatt Earp," his third in the genre (following "Silverado" and "Dances With Wolves").Epics, too, are Mr. Costner's forte -- he has now starred in three movies that run more than three hours in length ("Dances," "JFK" and "Earp"), more than probably any other Hollywood star working today.
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By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 22, 1990
Washington - Crowds swarmed outside the Uptown Theater Friday night because they had to -- HAD TO -- see heart-throb actor Kevin Costner.But many of those who paid up to $100 for the world premiere of "Dances With Wolves," Mr. Costner's epic new film about a Lakota Indian frontier before the encroachment of white settlers, came because they had to see the movie.Mixed in with an audience of members of Congress, football players and models were those like Bill Achord. He came from faraway Lincoln, Neb., where there's a large Lakota community, because he was so anxious to see the movie.
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By Jean Marbella | July 29, 1991
As an aging minor league catcher in the movie "Bull Durham," he spoke longingly of "The Show" -- the big leagues, that mythic place where the balls are white, the women have great legs and you don't have to carry your own luggage on road trips.It took a couple of years, but Kevin Costner indeed made it to The Show -- at least for the hour or so that he batted and fielded with the Baltimore Orioles during their regular pre-game practice at Memorial Stadium yesterday."This is a big day for me," enthused the boyish actor.
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By Dallas Morning News | December 23, 1991
In Oliver Stone's "JFK," Kevin Costner plays crusading attorney Jim Garrison, who challenged the Warren Commission's report on the John F. Kennedy assassination by bringing New Orleans businessman Clay Shaw to trial on a conspiracy charge.Unlike Mr. Stone, Mr. Costner -- a friend of President Bush -- is reluctant to discuss politics."My politics vary on different issues," says Mr. Costner. "When I was in college, my brother was in Vietnam. The most daring thing I did in college was listen to Mort Sahl.
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January 18, 2008
67 Bobby Goldsboro Singer 53 Kevin Costner Actor-director 39 Jesse L. Martin Actor 37 Jonathan Davis Rock singer 28 Jason Segel Actor
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | June 1, 2007
"There's dead and then there's dead," quipped Kevin Costner as a Coast Guard swimmer in The Guardian. He could have used that line in the inflated suspense film Mr. Brooks. He plays the title character, a serial killer with a double life and double standards. The successful owner of a chic Portland, Ore., box company, with a comely wife (Marg Helgenberger) and a smart, pretty daughter (Danielle Panabaker), he knows he kills out of compulsion - he goes to AA meetings and confesses he's an addict.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun reporter | December 13, 2006
Whatever you want to know about Florida State basketball, go ahead and "Ask Al." He might just answer it. Senior star forward and NBA prospect Al Thornton is the only player on the Seminoles' roster with his own school-sponsored Web site - www.althornton12.com - and it features a question-and-answer forum. "The Web site is kind of interesting," Thornton, 6 feet 8, 220 pounds, said. "Sometimes I get some off-the-wall questions I really can't respond to, but it's a success." It's also one more responsibility that has come with his team-high 15.8 points and 6.1 rebounds per game.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 29, 2006
The Guardian is that rarest of cinematic commodities: an action movie displaying brains and heart and the opportunity for its stars to do something more than keep the narrative flowing between explosions. Perhaps that should come as no surprise, as it was directed by Andrew Davis, whose 1993 The Fugitive remains a high-water mark for modern action-adventure flicks. It's also one of the few in which the acting - especially Tommy Lee Jones' Oscar-winning turn as a no-nonsense U.S. marshal - was as lauded as the action.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 10, 2006
A feature in which Sun writers and critics sound off about the movies. There's no easier route to Oscar's heart than pulling off a tough physical transformation. This year is no exception, whether it's George Clooney's gaining 30 pounds for Syriana and acting every bit the burned-out case, or Philip Seymour Hoffman shedding 30 to 40 pounds for Capote and turning into a dapper man of letters. Of course, their characterizations were terrific, inside and out. But what about a performer who simply shows up on a set looking overweight and then wrings every nip of comic and dramatic juice out of a role?
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2005
A producer friend has a personal insult for a film so thin it doesn't seem to exist: He calls it "a rumor." He'll find Rumor Has It an apt title. There's some sass to the set-up: what if a confused woman named Sarah Huttinger (Jennifer Aniston) discovered that her late mother and her salty, still-kicking grandmother (Shirley MacLaine) were the real-life models for Elaine and Mrs. Robinson in The Graduate? And what if she searched for "Benjamin Braddock," who bedded them both, and found that he's Beau Burroughs (Kevin Costner)
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 26, 1991
As expected, "Dances With Wolves," the majestic story of a cavalry officer's interaction with the Lakota Sioux in 1863, won the lion's share of awards at last night's 63rd annual Academy Awards with seven Oscars, including best picture and a best director award for first-time director Kevin Costner.But Costner did not win best actor, for which he was also nominated; that went, instead, to the British actor Jeremy Irons, for his role as Claus Von Bulow in "Reversal of Fortune," Barbet Schroeder's icy yet amusing version of the alleged poisoning of the still comatose heiress Sonny Von Bulow, Claus' wife.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 21, 1990
DANCES WITH Wolves'' runs a fraction more than three hours but justifies its running time. There are moments, though. There is one when a commanding officer commits suicide, and you're not sure why. There is another, at the beginning of the film, when the lead character's behavior seems curious more than desperate.At another point, the new film plays like ''Blazing Saddles,'' but these are the exceptions. For the most part, ''Dances With Wolves'' is tight and interesting throughout.Kevin Costner stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 4, 2005
Baseball movies have been very good to Kevin Costner. Well, two anyway: 1988's Bull Durham and 1989's Field of Dreams. It is doubtful Costner includes the dreadful 1982 obscurity Chasing Dreams on his resume, and 1999's For Love of the Game did not exactly hit a home run. Although his latest film, The Upside of Anger (New Line, $28) is not a baseball film, the dramedy casts Costner as a former baseball player turned sports radio host. And he gives one of his most casual, engaging performances as the charming, hard-living, hard-drinking Denny - sort of a close relative to his Crash Davis of Bull Durham - who sets his romantic sights on his neighbor (Joan Allen, in fine form)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 18, 2005
Joan Allen used to specialize in mice, but she becomes the mouse that roared in Mike Binder's original, unfailingly entertaining marital-breakup movie The Upside of Anger. As Pat Nixon in Nixon and Elizabeth Proctor in The Crucible, Allen played to perfection the long-suffering wife. Not here. As Terry Wolfmeyer, a mother of four girls who is unfailingly "nice" up to the moment her husband leaves her, Allen uses her pale, slender beauty like a stiletto. Terry pokes holes in family memories, her daughters' dreams and the ego of the lover who means to save her - Denny Davies (Kevin Costner)
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