Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCosta Rica
IN THE NEWS

Costa Rica

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1997
Ticos top the World Cup qualifying menu for the U.S. national men's soccer team tomorrow afternoon in Portland, Ore., for a game that was sold out three months ago.But will the Ticos, as Costa Rica's team is known, be hot and spicy, or, as in their past two games, cold and flavorless?For the U.S. team, inching through five regional qualifying games toward next summer's World Cup finals in France, here are a couple of other questions:Will home cooking perk up a club that sometimes seems soft in confidence?
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2004
Last month, Alexander Frank Skutch, the noted Baltimore born and raised ornithologist, died eight days short of his 100th birthday at Finca Los Cusingos, his 178-acre home in the tropical rain forest of Costa Rica, where he had happily spent the last 63 years observing and writing about the avian life that swooped, swirled and nested around him. An obituary in the Los Angeles Times said his legacy in the field of ornithology was only "paralleled by...
SPORTS
October 9, 2005
Fourteen more teams qualified for next year's World Cup, with England, Italy and the Netherlands leading the way in Europe. Three other European teams also made it yesterday - Portugal, Croatia and Poland - while Ukraine and host Germany had already advanced. All five African spots were also filled, with Togo, Ghana, Ivory Coast and Angola qualifying for the first time. Tunisia claimed the final spot from the region. Also, Paraguay and Ecuador joined already-qualified Brazil and Argentina from South America, while host Costa Rica beat the United States, 3-0, to earn the third berth out of CONCACAF.
FEATURES
By Bill Begalke and Bill Begalke,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 13, 1996
It had been 10 years since I last saw the seedy port of Puntarenas on Costa Rica's Pacific coast. In Spanish its name means point of sand, and that is precisely what it is, a long, narrow peninsula of sand, not even four city blocks wide, ocean to bay.The single highway and an abandoned railroad track run directly up the spine of the point, each side lined with beach-front houses behind iron walls, small shops, bars and auto-repair yards all painted vivid...
SPORTS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 8, 1997
PORTLAND, Ore. -- Midfielder Tab Ramos kissed away 10 months of frustration yesterday when his 22-yard scoring smash lifted the U.S. soccer team over a major hurdle in World Cup qualifying.The goal gave the United States a 1-0 victory over closest rival Costa Rica and virtually guaranteed the Americans a third straight Cup appearance.Ramos was playing his first game for the United States since tearing a knee ligament last November and had helped set up several failed opportunities for his clearly dominant mates.
TRAVEL
By Glenn Fawcett and Glenn Fawcett,glenn.fawcett@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
As we drove up, down and around Costa Rica's twisty mountain roads, edging bicyclists and pedestrians on the path to the small town of La Fortuna, I realized the sun was going to set much sooner than I had thought. After a full day of travel, we were still miles from our destination. Driving unfamiliar terrain in a foreign country that seems to eschew street signs had put us behind in our goal of reaching our lodging near the base of an active volcano before nightfall.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Laura Sullivan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1999
Federal officials are investigating whether hundreds of thousands of unreported dollars have been siphoned from two prominent Annapolis restaurants and the Maryland Wine Festival and funneled into real estate investments in Costa Rica, say sources familiar with the investigation.Internal Revenue Service agents are looking at records of daily food and beverage sales at Middleton Tavern and O'Brien's Oyster Bar and Restaurant -- both owned by Annapolis businessman Jerome Hardesty -- say the sources, who spoke on the condition of anonymity.
TRAVEL
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2004
A growling outboard motor pushed our boat slowly along the winding channels of the Tamarindo estuary. Crocodiles peered at us from the coffee-colored water, then slipped beneath the surface among the mangrove roots. Somewhere deep in the forest, howler monkeys hooted at our passing. Then the cell phone rang, wrecking our fantasy of motoring through the jungle aboard the African Queen. But the phone was a reminder that we had come to Costa Rica's northwest Guanacaste province because of its easy accessibility to some of the country's rich natural heritage, and also its creature comforts.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 28, 1994
Costa Rica has no army. Maryland needs no governor.Parris already adopted half of Ellen's policies in hopes of dissuading her from suing.Algeria's civil war dropped out of the sky into France, but it was there all along.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Yesterday in one sentence: The nation of Brazil let out the world's largest sigh of relief after a win in penalties against Chile, and Uruguay proved (wait for it) toothless in attack when held up against Colombia and its star forward James Rodriguez. What's on tap: Netherlands vs. Mexico, 12 p.m., ABC; Costa Rica vs. Greece, 4 p.m., ABC. What you'll see: If Saturday was decidedly South American, here's to a Sunday that is decidedly CONCACAF-y. Along with the United States, a record three teams from the North and Central American federation advanced to the knockout rounds, with Mexico and Costa Rica fighting to move on today.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.