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BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 5, 2003
Relocating to a new city for a job opportunity usually involves a number of significant changes in your life, especially cost-of-living considerations. Before you take a new job in a different city, it would be a good idea to first check out how your current salary would measure up in a new location, and how much more money you might need to earn. Lots of user-friendly cost-of-living calculators on the World Wide Web can help you figure out what your salary needs will be in a new city.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Howard County public school officials and the county's teachers union made little progress Monday after resuming contentious negotiations on pay increases for teachers in the coming budget. Teachers and the Howard County Education Association have sharply criticized Superintendent Renee Foose's initial budget proposal, which includes a 0.5 percent cost-of-living increase but no step increase on the salary scale. Work sessions on Foose's $742 million proposal are scheduled to resume Tuesday.
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BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | April 21, 1997
CONGRESS and the White House are having second thoughts about changing the way the government figures cost-of-living increases. Many programs are indexed to the Consumer Price Index (CPI), but most experts think that the CPI overstates the real rise in the cost of living.By revising the way it indexes payments, the government could produce a quick budget fix. It would nip a few dollars out of almost everyone's pocket but ease the pressure on Medicare and other popular programs.A couple of months ago, you heard a lot of brave talk about forming a bipartisan commission to figure out how to proceed.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
The next big battle for federal workers might not be over another government shutdown, but how to measure inflation. The long-term budget deal that lawmakers agreed last month to pursue is expected to include discussion on whether the federal government should switch from the Consumer Price Index, its current means of tracking rising costs, to the so-called chained CPI. Chained CPI measures inflation at a slightly lower rate. Adopting that method would bring in more revenue, because tax brackets and many deductions are adjusted annually for inflation.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2010
More than 115,000 retirees and beneficiaries collecting state pensions won't see an increase in their checks next month — a first since annual cost-of-living adjustments were put in place in 1971. Retirement payments were actually set to drop slightly in lockstep with the Consumer Price Index, a common measure of inflation that fell in 2009 after rising for more than half a century. Instead, the General Assembly decided to hold the benefits steady and plans to subtract from any increase next year the amount added this year to make up for deflation.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 14, 1991
HONOLULU -- A year ago, fed up with the high cost of living in Hawaii, investment adviser Robert W. Chamberlain picked up his "Places Rated Almanac" and shopped for a cheaper place to live.He and his wife settled on Sewickley, Pa., a swank community near Pittsburgh where the Chamberlains now happily reside in double the house at half the price and on half the salary."It wasn't so much that we decided to move to Pennsylvania but decided that Hawaii didn't have what we wanted any longer," said the 40-year-old Mr. Chamberlain, one of a growing number of Hawaiians buying one-way tickets to the mainland.
NEWS
By Rhasheema A. Sweeting and Rhasheema A. Sweeting,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2005
Looking for a place to stretch your hard-earned dollar a little further? Baltimore may be the place. The city was named one of the top five metropolitan areas for stretching salaries the furthest, according to a May study. Salary.com, which conducted the study, ranked Baltimore third, behind New London, Conn. and Huntsville, Ala., among American cities where salaries measure up well against cost of living. At the bottom of the list - places where the average wage struggles against the cost of living - were New York, San Francisco and San Diego.
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue | September 12, 2004
Punch up: www.salary.com Why it clicks: If you've ever wondered how your salary ranks against the same job in other cities, check out this Web site for a quick comparison. The download: While a 12- to 14-page personal report will cost you $49.95, there is plenty of free, basic information on the Web site. There's a cost-of-living calculator that will tell you how much you would have to make in a different city to equal your current salary, and how much your expenses would rise or fall.
NEWS
June 12, 2001
The average cost of renting an unfurnished, two-bedroom, two-bath apartment of about 950 square feet, excluding utilities, in Baltimore City is $550 a month, compared with $613 nationwide. Source: ACCRA, Cost of Living Index, first quarter of 2000.
NEWS
October 25, 2001
Baltimore is the second-best place in the nation for lesbians to live, according to Girlfriends magazine, which cites the city's "low cost of living, comprehensive mass transportation and a growing job market," as well as its "high-tech friendliness." For more information, go to www.gfriends.com/story. City Rank Milwaukee 1 Baltimore 2 Los Angeles 3 Portland, Ore. 4 Chicago 5 Rochester, N.Y. 6 Seattle 7 Philadelphia 8 Detroit 9 Phoenix, Ariz. 10
NEWS
April 11, 2013
President Barack Obama didn't release his proposed budget for 2014 until Wednesday, but liberals and the AARP have been howling all week about something they expected to be in it. What has our president done to provoke such outrage among his supporters? He's chained CPI. In an attempt to meet Republicans halfway in the battle over taxes and spending, Mr. Obama has offered to change the formula for calculating Social Security's annual cost-of-living increase - an "entitlement reform" GOP leaders have long asked for. The result would not change current Social Security benefits, but it would reduce future raises by an estimated three-tenths of 1 percent in the first year, or about $42 for the average beneficiary.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
Baltimore residents would have to pay more to grab a cab. They would be hit with an additional fee in their water bills. And they would have 300 fewer firefighters on the payroll. But they also would have lower property taxes, better recreation centers and fewer potholes. Those are some of the "tough trade-offs" Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake proposed Wednesday under a budget plan that also includes major cutbacks in pension and health care benefits to help close a $30 million projected budget shortfall.
EXPLORE
February 27, 2012
About 30 members of Mason-Dixon Business Association attended the organization's Feb.15 luncheon meeting to hear a presentation by Kevin Cysyk, executive director of Country Meadows Retirement Communities of York, Pa. Held at Geneva Farm Golf Club's Twin Silos Restaurant, the meeting featured information about the living and financial needs of senior citizens, described by Cysyk as "something you haven't had to think about too much. " Cysyk challenged the business leaders present, saying, "All of you have the ability to serve this market - the senior market.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2012
State education leaders have offered legislators their recommendations for fixing the state law that requires local governments to fund their public schools at a minimum level. The state's superintendents, teachers union and local school boards released a plan Tuesday that would tighten a law meant to require that counties fund their schools at the minimum per pupil amount that they did the year before. The law was weakened last legislative session, they say, and must be fixed. They want to ensure that governments do not decrease the money they spend on schools.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2010
More than 58 million Social Security beneficiaries won't get an increase in their checks in 2011, the second year in a row that low inflation will keep benefits flat, the Social Security Administration announced Friday. Social Security has been automatically adjusting checks for inflation since 1975, and 2010 was the first year that beneficiaries did not get an increase. Back-to-back years without one will affect people with disabilities, survivors of deceased workers and, mostly, retirees.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2010
More than 115,000 retirees and beneficiaries collecting state pensions won't see an increase in their checks next month — a first since annual cost-of-living adjustments were put in place in 1971. Retirement payments were actually set to drop slightly in lockstep with the Consumer Price Index, a common measure of inflation that fell in 2009 after rising for more than half a century. Instead, the General Assembly decided to hold the benefits steady and plans to subtract from any increase next year the amount added this year to make up for deflation.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1997
The cost of living in the Baltimore area is the fifth- lowest among 25 large U.S. metropolitan areas, according to a survey released by the BWI Business Partnership Inc.Baltimore prices for products and services such as housing, health care and entertainment were 1.3 percent below the national average in the first quarter of 1997.The favorable ranking positions Baltimore as an ideal place to live and work, said Neil M. Shpritz, executive director of the BWI Business Partnership, a nonprofit economic development agency.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2010
Baltimore County police officers and deputy sheriffs have agreed to forgo cost-of-living adjustments and pay more into their pensions in exchange for job security. Under contracts ratified by the unions that represent 2,000 employees in the police and sheriff's departments, members may not be laid off or furloughed at least through June 2012, officials said. They will receive previously scheduled increment and longevity increases, but not cost-of-living adjustments. The firefighters union and several others have reached similar agreements with the county, subject to ratification by their members, county officials said.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | June 7, 2009
School officials praised an effort to protect teacher and classroom programs after the approval of the system's capital and operating budgets totaling $727.45 million. "This year finds us in fairly good shape," said board member Patricia Gordon. "This has been a tough year, but we've come through it as usual." Board member Larry Cohen added that the budget process "was real smooth." The $656.69 million operating budget includes money that will provide each teacher with a 1.2 percent cost-of-living increase, which will take effect in the coming school year.
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