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NEWS
October 4, 2011
Tuesday's announcement that Hopkins astronomer Adam G. Riess will share this year's Nobel Prize in physics acknowledges his huge contribution to scientific knowledge. From the study of giant exploding stars millions of light-years from Earth, Mr. Riess and his colleagues, Saul Perlmutter of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California and Brian P. Schmidt of the Australian National University in Australia, deduced the astonishing hypothesis that our universe is being violently blown apart by an immensely powerful, previously unsuspected force.
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NEWS
October 4, 2011
Tuesday's announcement that Hopkins astronomer Adam G. Riess will share this year's Nobel Prize in physics acknowledges his huge contribution to scientific knowledge. From the study of giant exploding stars millions of light-years from Earth, Mr. Riess and his colleagues, Saul Perlmutter of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California and Brian P. Schmidt of the Australian National University in Australia, deduced the astonishing hypothesis that our universe is being violently blown apart by an immensely powerful, previously unsuspected force.
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NEWS
By Colin Nickerson and Colin Nickerson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 18, 2007
GENEVA -- In a 17-mile circular tunnel curving beneath the Swiss-French border, scientists are poised to re-create the universe's first trillionth of a second. The aim of the audacious undertaking -- whose centerpiece is the Large Hadron Collider, the largest, most powerful particle accelerator ever constructed -- is to solve one of the most perturbing puzzles of physics: How did matter attain mass and form the cosmos? Even Einstein couldn't nail that one. The collider and its multibillion-dollar array of ancillary instruments are designed to re-create and identify the most infinitesimal of subatomic substances -- the material that built the galaxies -- as they blaze into existence with fantastic energy and disappear with such rapidity as to make the blink of an eye seem an eternity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Sun Movie Critic | April 7, 2010
"Hubble 3D," a celebration of the orbiting space telescope and the NASA crew that gave it new life last year, provides a glimpse of how star systems looked a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. It reveals the borders of the visible universe. It drinks in the spectacle of celestial bodies born in fiery pillars of clouds. The content is scientific. The imagery gets biblical. In fact, after Baltimore-based astronaut John Grunsfeld witnessed a positive power check on a Hubble camera he'd installed, he said, "Let there be light."
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | July 27, 2003
I planted my vegetable seeds in early May, but many of them never grew. This has never happened before. What would keep them from growing? Several gardeners have told me they had the same problem this spring. My guess is that your seeds rotted in the soil when the weather was exceptionally rainy and the soil remained wet for a number of weeks this spring. Evenly moist soil favors healthy seed germination, however extremely wet conditions favor soil diseases that can kill seeds either prior to or during germination.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2005
MOSCOW - An experimental satellite designed to test spacecraft propulsion by solar power crashed into the ocean shortly after takeoff when the launch rocket shut down prematurely, Russian space officials said yesterday. But the Planetary Society, the Pasadena, Calif., organization that sponsored the flight, held out a slim hope that the craft, called Cosmos 1, made it into orbit, albeit one very different from the orbit that had been planned. A news release issued by the Russian space agency early yesterday said that the converted intercontinental ballistic missile that launched Cosmos 1 from a submarine in the Barents Sea suffered an engine failure in its first stage 83 seconds after ignition - well short of the estimated six minutes the ICBM's three stages were to fire.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | July 10, 2005
My pin oak has little nutlike growths on its leaves. What should I do? Galls are very common on oaks and maples. These growths are abnormal swellings of plant tissue, usually leaves and twigs, caused by insects, mites, bacteria, fungi or nematodes. Most insect and mite galls result from chemicals introduced by egg laying and feeding. The chemicals cause the affected tree cells to swell. Though galls appear in many strange forms, they rarely do any harm. They do not affect the health of the tree and are more of a cosmetic issue.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Staff Writer | September 11, 1993
When Werner Roth came to this country and began making his way through the soccer ranks, he never expected to wind up in a movie with Sylvester Stallone.Thanks to soccer, he did. He and soccer's main legend, Pele, teamed with Stallone and Michael Caine in "Victory," a film in which Allied prisoners of war agreed to a soccer match against Hitler's Germans as an opportunity to escape."Pele, Caine and Stallone played for the Allies," Roth said. "I was the main bad guy for Germany."Roth, 45, former captain of the New York Cosmos, is one of the headliners of Soccer Blast USA, a soccer festival that will he staged tomorrow from noon to 6 p.m. at the Convention Center.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- When Richard Berendzen had dinner recently with three faculty members from the college he presided over for 10 years, the former American University president talked about black holes, extra-terrestrial life and the cosmos -- other-worldly topics he reveled in as a one-time professor of astronomy.But, quickly, the conversation turned to the world he knew and loved best until the spring of 1990 -- the university stratosphere from which he descended abruptly after having been discovered making obscene telephone calls.
NEWS
November 8, 1994
Recent reports that the universe may be significantly younger than previously thought have sent scientists back to the drawing boards and challenged some of their most settled notions about the size and structure of the cosmos.Last month a team of researchers working with the Hubble Space Telescope reported that calculations derived from a new measurement of the distance to the spiral galaxy M100 -- some 56 million light years from the Sun -- suggests the universe may be no more than 8 billion to 12 billion years old, rather than previous estimates of 15 billion to 20 billion years.
NEWS
February 16, 2008
I am thrilled that the Walters Art Museum collaborated with the Space Telescope Science Institute to bring to the public stunning images of deep space captured by the Hubble Space Telescope. I was recently at the Walters and caught the mesmerizing exhibit Mapping the Cosmos: Images from the Hubble Space Telescope. I later read the essay "Seeing stars" (Opinion Commentary, Feb. 10) by Gary Vikan, the director of the Walters Art Museum. In his column, Mr. Vikan says that art and science have been following divergent paths for centuries and that Mapping the Cosmos is the museum's small way of helping bridge this divide.
NEWS
By Gary Vikan | February 10, 2008
Many people were surprised that the Walters Art Museum would partner with the Space Telescope Science Institute (along with the Johns Hopkins University's Program in Museums and Society) to bring photo enlargements from the Hubble Space Telescope to our exhibition galleries. After all, most of us believe that art and science have been following divergent paths for centuries - since long before physicist and novelist C. P. Snow made that seeming split explicit in his famous Rede Lecture of May 1959, "The Two Cultures," wherein he characterized the two as mutually incomprehensible.
NEWS
October 8, 2007
ALEXANDRA BOULAT, 45 Photojournalist French photojournalist Alexandra Boulat, whose photographs from Iraq, Afghanistan and the former Yugoslavia gave the world an intimate look at life in conflict zones, died Friday in a Paris hospital, her photo agency said. Ms. Boulat, the daughter of celebrated Life magazine photographer Pierre Boulat, suffered an aneurysm in late June and had been in a coma since then, according to her mother, Annie Boulat, the founder of the France-based Cosmos photo agency.
NEWS
By Colin Nickerson and Colin Nickerson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 18, 2007
GENEVA -- In a 17-mile circular tunnel curving beneath the Swiss-French border, scientists are poised to re-create the universe's first trillionth of a second. The aim of the audacious undertaking -- whose centerpiece is the Large Hadron Collider, the largest, most powerful particle accelerator ever constructed -- is to solve one of the most perturbing puzzles of physics: How did matter attain mass and form the cosmos? Even Einstein couldn't nail that one. The collider and its multibillion-dollar array of ancillary instruments are designed to re-create and identify the most infinitesimal of subatomic substances -- the material that built the galaxies -- as they blaze into existence with fantastic energy and disappear with such rapidity as to make the blink of an eye seem an eternity.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | May 12, 2007
Wow. You get caught up in other projects, get a little busy, and suddenly you wake up and they changed the blog name on you. Just kidding. This has been in the works for a while. The online powers-that-be suggested a few months ago that it was time for this blog to have a distinct name and a distinct identity, something a little more creative than just my name slapped on top of it. Everyone else's blog does, and always has, from Roch Around the Clock to Medium Well to O, by the Way. I agreed.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | July 10, 2005
My pin oak has little nutlike growths on its leaves. What should I do? Galls are very common on oaks and maples. These growths are abnormal swellings of plant tissue, usually leaves and twigs, caused by insects, mites, bacteria, fungi or nematodes. Most insect and mite galls result from chemicals introduced by egg laying and feeding. The chemicals cause the affected tree cells to swell. Though galls appear in many strange forms, they rarely do any harm. They do not affect the health of the tree and are more of a cosmetic issue.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | May 12, 2007
Wow. You get caught up in other projects, get a little busy, and suddenly you wake up and they changed the blog name on you. Just kidding. This has been in the works for a while. The online powers-that-be suggested a few months ago that it was time for this blog to have a distinct name and a distinct identity, something a little more creative than just my name slapped on top of it. Everyone else's blog does, and always has, from Roch Around the Clock to Medium Well to O, by the Way. I agreed.
NEWS
By Gary Vikan | February 10, 2008
Many people were surprised that the Walters Art Museum would partner with the Space Telescope Science Institute (along with the Johns Hopkins University's Program in Museums and Society) to bring photo enlargements from the Hubble Space Telescope to our exhibition galleries. After all, most of us believe that art and science have been following divergent paths for centuries - since long before physicist and novelist C. P. Snow made that seeming split explicit in his famous Rede Lecture of May 1959, "The Two Cultures," wherein he characterized the two as mutually incomprehensible.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2005
MOSCOW - An experimental satellite designed to test spacecraft propulsion by solar power crashed into the ocean shortly after takeoff when the launch rocket shut down prematurely, Russian space officials said yesterday. But the Planetary Society, the Pasadena, Calif., organization that sponsored the flight, held out a slim hope that the craft, called Cosmos 1, made it into orbit, albeit one very different from the orbit that had been planned. A news release issued by the Russian space agency early yesterday said that the converted intercontinental ballistic missile that launched Cosmos 1 from a submarine in the Barents Sea suffered an engine failure in its first stage 83 seconds after ignition - well short of the estimated six minutes the ICBM's three stages were to fire.
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