Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCosmetic Surgery
IN THE NEWS

Cosmetic Surgery

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | August 24, 2010
I've always been in favor of making the most of who I am, living every day to the fullest, and being the best I can be. That's why I exercise, drink a lot of water, and write topic sentences that sound like a blend of advertising for Geritol and the United States Army. But I'm becoming increasing aggravated by the constant cosmetic-surgery messaging directed primarily at women — urging us to plump our lips, ease our wrinkles and lift our eyebrows — right on up to the advanced age when we'll need to use a wheelchair on the way into the operating room as well as on the way out. Oh, I've thought about cosmetic surgery, to be sure.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By David Horsey | August 12, 2014
The awfulness of Gaza goes on. So does the madness in Iraq and Syria. Wildfires burn through the West, while in Washington, D.C., our do-absolutely-nothing Congress prepares to adjourn, freeing up time for representatives and senators to go home and campaign to be re-elected so they can accomplish nothing for another two years. It seems an opportune time to consider a far less depressing issue, one that, outside of Hollywood and the Redneck Riviera, affects only a small minority: artificial body enhancement, AKA cosmetic surgery or "having a little work done.
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 19, 2013
Cosmetic surgery is on the rise, led by people getting chemical peels, laser hair removal and other minimally-invasive procedures, according to a report released Tuesday by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Plastic surgery procedures increased 5 percent in 2012 with doctors performing 14.6 million procedures. Minimally invasive procedures increased 6 percent and surgical procedures declined 2 percent. The top minimally invasive procedures were:   •     Botulinum toxin type A (6.1 million procedures, up 8 percent)
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Maryland is moving to toughen regulations on the fast-growing medspa industry - a move designed to narrow a "loophole" and prevent deaths such as one last year following a liposuction treatment at a Timonium facility. Regulations being discussed by state officials would bar plastic surgeons from performing liposuction and other procedures in medspas and medical offices unless the facilities are inspected by the government or third-party accrediting bodies, Maryland Secretary of Health Joshua Sharfstein said.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
A 59-year-old Lochearn woman died Monday of a rare infection after liposuction surgery, and two other patients have also contracted infections, prompting health officials Wednesday to shut down the Timonium cosmetic surgery center where each was treated. Monarch Medspa officials are cooperating as Maryland and Baltimore County health officials investigate the source of the infections, which involve the same bacteria that causes strep throat. But the bacteria can be significantly more dangerous when infecting other parts of the body, sometimes causing shock, organ failure and even death.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | June 14, 2006
Some aging workers have a radical idea about putting a new face on their curriculum vitae. Seasoned professionals have been turning to botox injections and other minimally invasive cosmetic procedures to buff up their career prospects. Dr. Leonard Miller, a plastic surgeon who teaches at Harvard Medical School, said career pressures are a major reason why resorting to such procedures has increased substantially over the past five years. "People want to stay competitive," Miller said.
NEWS
By STEPHEN G. HENDERSON and STEPHEN G. HENDERSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2005
Elisabeth Reed, a writer in Santa Fe, N.M., is an attractive 59-year-old who looks perhaps a decade younger. This, she believes, is because she never smoked, eats well and plays tennis regularly. Oh yes, there's one other possible explanation. Five years ago, she had a face-lift. "Someone showed me a picture of myself, and I saw a little droop in my neck that I'd had since I was 28. I thought it was high time to get rid of it," she explained. "What I hadn't realized, though, is that there are politics involved in cosmetic surgery.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1995
In Oscar Ramirez, people have found the fountain of youth.Dr. Ramirez, 46, a soft-spoken, self-effacing Lutherville plastic surgeon, is the first to develop and use endoscopic instruments for plastic surgery, techniques that in other medical specialties allow doctors to see and work inside the body without making large incisions. And today his instruments are driving the field of cosmetic surgery.The technology means more people can perfect their faces more easily. Younger people, older people, and, for the first time, balding men can get facelifts or brow lifts with minimal scarring and time away from work.
NEWS
By Benedict Carey and By Benedict Carey,Special to the Sun | April 21, 2002
Between the ages 25 and 65, the nose stretches by 10 percent, on average, its tip moving downward by about a quarter-inch. The brows can sink by one-third of an inch, the ears by slightly more, the cheek tissue by as much as a half-inch. Overall, more than 30 percent of a person's facial area may drop from above the mid-face line into fleshy folds below. "At some point, you look in the mirror and you just can't believe it's you," said B.J. Roberts, 71, of Los Angeles, who recently had cosmetic surgery.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,SUN REPORTER | December 21, 2006
As Christmas approached two years ago, Patrick Pieper was stumped - what should he get his wife? Then inspiration struck: a gift certificate, redeemable at a Baltimore doctor's office, for $7,000 in facial plastic surgery. "They gave me an envelope and I got a nice card and put it in a box," he said. "I think I stuck it in her stocking. I thought it was the perfect gift." Some might argue that Pieper harbored a death wish. And Suzanne Pieper, 43, does recall being "shocked" when she opened the card Christmas morning in their Perry Hall home.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
A bill to give health regulators more oversight of facilities like the now-closed Monarch Medspa in Timonium is making a late surge in the General Assembly after weeks of discussions among state and industry officials. The House of Delegates unanimously passed the legislation Monday afternoon. It needs to clear the Senate, including an extra procedural step, within the next week. The legislative session draws to a close April 8. If passed, the law would close a regulatory gap that does not allow state health officials to proactively inspect and oversee plastic surgery centers.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2013
Ace, a youthful Labrador, bounds across his lawn, fielding tennis balls and hurrying them back to his owner. His tail wags. His coat is thick and shiny. He barks with enthusiasm. To the naked eye, Ace is a strapping example of dogdom. Who would guess that he's had work done? An eye job, in fact. Ace is one of thousands of dogs who've had plastic surgery. A little nip. A little tuck. Eye lifts. Nose jobs. Exactly the sorts of procedures people get. But unlike cosmetic surgery for humans, dogs and cats aren't doing it to look better at their high school reunion.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
A 59-year-old Lochearn woman died Monday of a rare infection after liposuction surgery, and two other patients have also contracted infections, prompting health officials Wednesday to shut down the Timonium cosmetic surgery center where each was treated. Monarch Medspa officials are cooperating as Maryland and Baltimore County health officials investigate the source of the infections, which involve the same bacteria that causes strep throat. But the bacteria can be significantly more dangerous when infecting other parts of the body, sometimes causing shock, organ failure and even death.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | April 6, 2012
Most would agree that some cosmetic surgery can give us the proverbial new lease on life. It applies to people. It applies to restaurants. Aface-liftis just what Chris Infantino, the current owner of Tino's Italian Bistro, did when he acquired the storefront space formerly known as Strapazza. There wasn't much Infantino's interior designer could do about the building's facade, but inside you'll find a handsomely reconfigured upscale-looking restaurant/bistro/trattoria -- in the burnt sienna walls, the wrought-iron sculptures hung on them, the floor-to-ceiling wine rack that divides the two dining rooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | January 20, 2012
This week's dining review in Live is of Midtown BBQ & Brew, the successor to Midtown Yacht Club. Erik Maza has the review here . Former owner Nathan Beveridge is back, and Anthony Harrison is in as managing parnter and chef. Harrison is a big barbecue guy and his barbecue is big. "The portions at Midtown are big," Erik says. "Even the half-rack of ribs is intimidating, and leaves plenty of leftovers. " About those ribs, they're not baby-back ribs. They're beef ribs, so no they may not fall of the bone, as the Constitution requires, but they have good, strong flavor that doesn't come from added-on sauce.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | August 24, 2010
I've always been in favor of making the most of who I am, living every day to the fullest, and being the best I can be. That's why I exercise, drink a lot of water, and write topic sentences that sound like a blend of advertising for Geritol and the United States Army. But I'm becoming increasing aggravated by the constant cosmetic-surgery messaging directed primarily at women — urging us to plump our lips, ease our wrinkles and lift our eyebrows — right on up to the advanced age when we'll need to use a wheelchair on the way into the operating room as well as on the way out. Oh, I've thought about cosmetic surgery, to be sure.
NEWS
December 14, 1995
An article Tuesday in the Today section should have noted that the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery, which provides referrals for experienced cosmetic surgeons, is not recognized by the American Medical Association as a specialty board. (Its members practice cosmetic surgery, but their medical school training is in another field such as dermatology.) The AMA-recognized cosmetic surgery association is the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc., at (310) 595-4255. Its members are plastic surgeons.
NEWS
March 7, 2010
The National Ovarian Cancer Coalition will sponsor a women's health expo from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 20 at the Sheraton Hotel, 173 Jennifer Road, Annapolis. Information on skin care, stress management, nutrition, cosmetic surgery, decorating tips, fitness, finance and belly dancing will be featured, including medical research advances and the latest treatments. The registration fee is $40 and includes breakfast. To register online go to nocc.kintera.org/centralmd or call 443-433-2597.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.