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By PHIL JACKMAN | April 25, 1995
There are probably as many Howard Cosell stories floating around as there are number of days the man trod the earth, which was in excess of 28,000 when he died Sunday.Here are a few of them, none of which either individually or collectively are designed to give us insight as to what manner of man Cosell was. If we couldn't come up with a satisfactory answer between 1953 and 1993, the years of his extremely public life, there's little chance of it occurring now.Of his oft-stated suggestion that he was the first person since Aristotle "To tell it like it is," New York columnist Jimmy Cannon wrote, "He's the first guy to put on a toupee and change his name [from Cohen]
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | November 26, 2009
He wore silver football shoes, the right color for a mercurial runner. Was there ever a seam so small that Joe Washington couldn't sneak through it? For three years, he rallied Colts fans, feinting and dashing and dancing for yardage, a ray of hope on a team spinning in reverse. "Yeah, they were lean times," Washington, 56, said of his stint in Baltimore (1978-1980). "But I never thought I had limits. I could get in and out of places that other guys couldn't dream of. "My feet had a mind of their own."
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SPORTS
November 3, 1990
New York Giants linebacker Lawrence Taylor said yesterday that he may take legal action against sportscaster Howard Cosell for suggesting on a radio talk show that Taylor has cheated on National Football League drug tests.Cosell said Thursday while a guest on Bill Mazer's show on WFAN in New York that Taylor "has fresh vials of Bible Belt urine," a suggestion that Taylor might be substituting his urine with someone else's to pass the league's drug test. Under the NFL's substance-abuse policy, athletes are required to give urine samples during random checks.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman | mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | November 26, 2009
He wore silver football shoes, the right color for a mercurial runner. Was there ever a seam so small that Joe Washington couldn't sneak through it? For three years, he rallied Colts fans, feinting and dashing and dancing for yardage, a ray of hope on a team spinning in reverse. "Yeah, they were lean times," Washington, 56, said of his stint in Baltimore (1978-1980). "But I never thought I had limits. I could get in and out of places that other guys couldn't dream of. "My feet had a mind of their own."
SPORTS
By Jack Craig and Jack Craig,Boston Globe | February 2, 1992
Howard Cosell retired from broadcasting Friday morning after his commentary on ABC Radio. For sound and fury, no one in sports broadcasting has ever touched him. He was unique.He also was an enigma, big time, often committing the cardinal sin of being cruel to anonymous broadcast gophers, then being helpful to another young person's career. Pop psychologists found him irresistible, a man with a loving family who found riches and fame in mid-life, yet became increasingly cutting toward others.
SPORTS
By Bob Raissman and Bob Raissman,New York Daily News | September 3, 1993
NEW YORK -- After he was trashed in Howard Cosell's book "I Never Played the Game," ABC Sports' Frank Gifford remained fairly quiet about his former "Monday Night Football" colleague.That will change upon release of Gifford's new book, "The Whole Ten Yards," excerpted in the next issue of TV Guide. Gifford writes that, as the years passed in his relationship with Cosell, the man became paranoid."What Howard was -- especially when he first came to TV -- was deeply insecure. Anyone who looked like Ichabod Crane and spoke with a nasal Brooklyn accent didn't exactly fit the sportscaster mold," former NFL star Gifford writes.
SPORTS
June 14, 1991
Cosell doing well after cancer surgeryBroadcaster Howard Cosell is doing well after removal of a cancerous tumor from his chest earlier in the week, according to his boss at ABC Radio."
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | February 7, 1995
If the current round of baseball labor talks falls through and the owners insist on bringing replacement players to spring training, count on hearing less of the Orioles on the radio than you might expect.That's because WBAL (1090 AM) will do fewer exhibition games and do them in a different way, station manager Jeff Beauchamp said.Beauchamp said the station, the flagship outlet for Orioles broadcasts, is considering a "play-by-occasional-play" plan, if the team opens spring training camp with replacement players.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | December 4, 1990
So where was Howard Cosell when we needed him?Oh, sure, you would have gotten sick and tired of him talking about the New York Football Giants (though judging from that 7-3 final score last night, you did need a reminder that they weren't playing baseball), but you could have counted on Cosell for telling it like it was, letting everyone know that the most ballyhooed Monday Night Football game in years was a pure stinkeroo.It's been a decade since ABC's Monday night NFL broadcasts have been the phenomenon they were for much of the 1970s.
SPORTS
By Steve Zipay and Steve Zipay,Newsday | December 26, 1994
Hard to believe, but it was 14 years ago during a "Monday Night Football" game in Miami that the often pompous and always opinionated Howard Cosell suddenly halted his byplay with Don Meredith and Frank Gifford.On that December night, Cosell was the first to tell tens of millions of TV viewers the stunning news: John Lennon had been shot and killed outside his apartment near Central Park. A shaken Cosell spoke sincerely about the former Beatle and later quoted from Keats. "My heart aches," Cosell said.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | December 7, 2006
A remark Tuesday by sports talk-show host Anita Marks has offended some blacks. Marks, on ESPN Radio, 1300 AM, referred to Shawne Merriman, a San Diego Chargers linebacker who is under suspension for steroid use, as a "juice monkey." "It's inappropriate," said Rob Long, a black host on a competing sports station, WNST, 1570 AM, who received several calls about the remark. "It was careless, and I think she should apologize." Marks, a former professional football player, did not return two calls seeking comment, but apparently said on the air yesterday that she uses the remark to refer to steroid users regardless of their color.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | August 23, 2006
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Sen. George Allen, Republican of Virginia, was caught on tape referring to a campaign worker for his Democratic opponent, James Webb, as a "macaca." The campaign worker, S.R. Sidarth, is East Indian, and it was quickly noted that the word "macaca" is considered a racial slur in some European countries. Macaques are monkeys and, thus, the derivative "macaca" is considered racially insensitive. Mr. Allen said he didn't mean to be offensive and was just joshing with the young man, but The Washington Post twice treated the incident as front-page news, and one of its columnists, Eugene Robinson, unburdened himself in 770 words hinting, if not at Mr. Allen's supposed racial insensitivity, then at his stupidity.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE and BILL ORDINE,SUN REPORTER | December 19, 2005
The simple name says it all. Monday. Night. Football. For 36 years, it has given hundreds of millions of Americans someplace to be on the first night of the workweek and often something to gab about the next day. It has been a town square where the bandstand featured touchdowns, sacks and occasional appearances by rock stars and political luminaries. Tonight's game featuring the stumbling Green Bay Packers against the equally reeling Ravens at M&T Bank Stadium is one of the final curtain calls for a television show that has been ABC's unfailing prime-time anchor since 1970.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 2003
A different diamond sparkled under Ripken Stadium's lights yesterday as two die-hard sports fans tied the knot on the minor-league ballpark's home plate. Melissa Tolson, 27, and Dave Bard, 30, of Odenton were married yesterday, making Tolson the first employee to be wed at the year-old ballpark. Although thunder could be heard as the wedding took place, the rain held off until the end of the ceremony. Tolson - the events planner for the IronBirds - shocked girlfriends and mothers by abandoning plans for a beach-side fete in favor of a baseball-themed wedding.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | January 13, 2002
Opinionated, respected and quick, Dennis Miller was picked in 2000 to resurrect the blend of irreverence and insight last heard on ABC's Monday Night Football from Howard Cosell. Many sports purists disagreed with the choice of the acerbic comic. On talk radio and in sports columns across the country, Miller received a rocky welcome. Ratings for MNF ebbed, and this year they dropped to all-time lows. But Miller, 48, who admitted he had attended only one professional football game before taking the job, calls his time in the booth with announcer Al Michaels and commentator Dan Fouts, a Hall of Fame quarterback, a success.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | January 13, 2002
Before the lights went down for the coming attractions, a trivia blurb on the screen reported that the most filmed character in movie history is Dracula, which at the moment seems inaccurate. At the moment, it seems to be Howard Cosell. The feature film was Ali, with Will Smith as Muhammad Ali and Jon Voight as half of a Cosellathon that will be playing in theaters and television tomorrow night. The other half is John Turturro in Monday Night Mayhem, a TV movie (TNT, 9 p.m.) dramatizing the perpetual ego-wrangling behind the scenes during Cosell's time on ABC's Monday Night Football.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | December 7, 2006
A remark Tuesday by sports talk-show host Anita Marks has offended some blacks. Marks, on ESPN Radio, 1300 AM, referred to Shawne Merriman, a San Diego Chargers linebacker who is under suspension for steroid use, as a "juice monkey." "It's inappropriate," said Rob Long, a black host on a competing sports station, WNST, 1570 AM, who received several calls about the remark. "It was careless, and I think she should apologize." Marks, a former professional football player, did not return two calls seeking comment, but apparently said on the air yesterday that she uses the remark to refer to steroid users regardless of their color.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | April 25, 1995
If good humor were all it took to vanquish the anger baseball fans feel toward a sport whose participants engaged themselves in an 7 1/2 -month long hissing match that settled next to nothing, then the task would be complete.Major League Baseball, for instance, launches its marketing campaign, titled "Welcome to the Show," which is expected to draw on the wacky side of the game, during tonight's Los Angeles Dodgers-Florida Marlins opener (7:30, ESPN).ESPN, which has the most to lose in terms of ratings in the early part of the season because it is the only nationally oriented regular baseball broadcaster, has debuted a funny bit during which a beautiful woman "morphs" into John Kruk over the narration of Billy Crystal.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2001
Most major-league bats are made from white ash, but the San Francisco Giants' Barry Bonds has his made from sugar maple wood. "If Bonds breaks Mark McGwire's [home run] record, will he get an ash-terisk next to it?" Bert Sugar asks in SportsBusiness Journal. Sugar's play on words shows he's a sportswriter with good punmanship. Some others in his company: Tom FitzGerald of the San Francisco Chronicle, who wrote of the NBA's repeatedly fining Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban for blasting the officiating: "If this keeps up, we may have a Cuban whistle crisis on our hands."
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2000
The ghost floating above the television this evening will be familiar enough: the bad hairpiece, the face of a dyspeptic Bela Lugosi and the voice like a guy behind a Brooklyn delicatessen counter reciting Leviticus. It's Howard Cosell, of course, drifting through the living room as "Monday Night Football" begins a new season, the Cosell chair in the play-by-play booth changing occupants once more, ABC-TV calling upon comedian Dennis Miller to jack up ratings for a former prime-time hit. With a few ex-jocks in between, we've gone from Howard the Humble to Dennis the Droll.
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