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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 2006
TRENTON, N.J. -- Gov. Jon Corzine signed an executive order yesterday shutting down the state's government, for the first time in its history. Horse racing at the state's tracks was called off, road construction projects were halted and about 45,000 of the state's 80,000 employees were put on furlough. The order, a result of an impasse between the governor and the legislature over the budget for the new fiscal year, began a process in which the state, during the next few days, may close state parks, two state-run beaches and, depending on the outcome of a court case, the 12 Atlantic City casinos.
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NEWS
By Dan Reed | November 28, 2012
In case anyone missed the news - and judging by the fact that there aren't angry mobs storming Washington, everyone missed the news - Congress recently absolved Jon Corzine of being criminally responsible for actions that "wiped out thousands of jobs and billions of dollars of customers' and creditors' money. " The congressional report states, "Choices made by Jon Corzine during his tenure as chairman and CEO sealed MF Global's fate. " Turns out, these choices include the unlawful transfer of its customers' money.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 12, 1999
NEW YORK -- Goldman Sachs Group LP's Jon Corzine stepped down yesterday as co-chief executive, ceding control of the biggest investment banking partnership after withdrawing a plan to sell stock to the public and losing hundreds of millions of dollars in bond trading.Corzine, 52, led the drive to go public and lost some of his stature after the 129-year-old firm canceled the stock sale in September as world markets plunged, Goldman employees said. He was also tarnished as a business he helped build -- bond trading -- suffered losses that led to an 81 percent decline in fourth-quarter pretax profit.
NEWS
October 25, 2012
I was saddened to see the small article inside the Maryland Business section of The Sun sounding the death knell for the investor lawsuit related to the implosion of MF Global and implying the futility of any further pursuit of Jon Corzine, the company's former chairman and CEO ("Corzine, banks push to end MF Global fraud lawsuit," Oct. 23). I fully expect that final absolution of Mr. Corzine will be dragged out for a respectably lengthy period and that we'll finally see a small article somewhere indicating that the tireless efforts of our public servants have come to an end and resulted in his acquittal.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 18, 2007
CAMDEN, N.J. -- In the seconds before Gov. Jon S. Corzine was critically injured in an accident Thursday, the Chevrolet Suburban he was riding in was traveling 91 miles an hour, 26 more than the posted speed limit, according to a crash data recorder retrieved from the vehicle. State Police Superintendent Joseph R. Fuentes said yesterday that the trooper driving the vehicle, Robert J. Rasinski, told investigators he had not known how fast he was traveling as he led Corzine's two-car motorcade, with the vehicle's emergency lights flashing, from Atlantic City, where Corzine had given a speech, to a meeting at the governor's mansion in Princeton.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2000
EAST BRUNSWICK, N.J. - Investment banker Jon S. Corzine, a political novice who spent a record $60 million on his Senate race, is Washington-bound. Corzine, who dipped into a $400 million personal fortune to buy television ads, was ahead of four-term Rep. Bob Franks by 50 percent to 47 percent, with 98 percent of precincts reporting. In his victory speech, Corzine promised "an America where every person has access to the American promise, just like my family and I have had." Corzine shattered the spending record for a Senate campaign held by Republican Michael Huffington, who spent $30 million in California six years ago and lost.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2000
PALMYRA, N.J. - Bob Franks has TV phobia these days - every time the Republican candidate for Senate tunes in, he sees another ad for his wealthy foe, Jon S. Corzine. "It made it very depressing to turn on the Olympics - you couldn't watch a half-hour segment ... without seeing another negative ad attacking Bob Franks," said Franks, a veteran lawmaker who has spent eight years as a congressman in Washington after 13 years in the state Assembly. So far, Franks' political experience is no match for Corzine's wallet.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2000
EAST BRUNSWICK, N.J. -- Investment banker Jon S. Corzine, a political novice who spent a record $60 million on his Senate race, is Washington-bound. Corzine, who dipped into a $400 million personal fortune to buy television ads, overwhelmed four-term Rep. Bob Franks, according to projections last night. Corzine shattered the spending record for a Senate campaign held by Republican Michael Huffington, who spent $30 million in California six years ago and lost. Corzine spent several million dollars in the races final days on a get-out-the-vote drive that included paying residents of a homeless shelter to publicize his name and put up yard signs.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff writer | April 30, 1991
A county police officer charged with beating a man during a traffic stop last year was found innocent by a departmental hearing board yesterday, despite testimony from three witnesses who said they saw him hit the man.After more than two hours of deliberation, the board of three county officers found Officer Donald Staten innocent of excessive force, failing to file a report and failing to identify himself.The officer said he was happy with the verdict and added, "Overall, with the new chief, there is a better rapport, and I think the trial boards will be a lot fairer."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 5, 2006
TRENTON, N.J. -- Instead of heading to the beach or preparing for a backyard barbecue, New Jersey's 120 legislators were called to the State House yesterday by Gov. Jon S. Corzine, who urged them to resolve a budget stalemate that has led to a four-day government shutdown. But the day ended with the impasse worse than ever. After listening to the governor make a 30-minute appeal, in which Corzine emphasized his willingness to compromise with fellow Democrats in the Assembly over his proposal to increase the state sales tax, Speaker Joseph J. Roberts Jr. declared that the governor's plan could not pass.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | November 6, 2011
Last week's collapse of MF Global, the investment banking company led by former New Jersey Gov. Jon Corzine, probably won't plunge the world into a new financial crisis. The firm is supposed to be too small to cause much damage. But the scandal foreshadows a future crisis unless negligent and clueless policymakers learn the lessons of the Great Recession. How obvious does it have to be? MF Global employed the means and methods that caused Lehman Brothers and Bear Stearns to blow up, and we're still arguing about whether to ban or control those methods.
TRAVEL
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | August 10, 2008
Atlantic City, N.J. - On stage a few weeks ago at the Music Box Theater at the Borgata Hotel, Idina Menzel (star of Broadway's Rent and Wicked) admitted having some anxiety about bringing her singing act to this seaside resort. A peasant dress she'd worn when performing in Manhattan the night before, Menzel said, didn't feel right for this evening. So, just before the curtain went up, she'd rushed out to buy a sexy black lace camisole and brassiere - the straps of which she flashed to her audience.
NEWS
April 19, 2007
Sometimes, it's an official-looking limousine that blazes by you on the highway as though you were standing still, but Lincoln Town Cars and SUVs like the 2005 Chevy Suburban that carried New Jersey Gov. Jon S. Corzine are also common. Governor Corzine's fateful ride ended one week ago when his Suburban crashed on the Garden State Parkway and he was seriously injured. On Tuesday, officials revealed an important fact in the case: His state trooper-driven car was traveling 91 miles per hour.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 18, 2007
CAMDEN, N.J. -- In the seconds before Gov. Jon S. Corzine was critically injured in an accident Thursday, the Chevrolet Suburban he was riding in was traveling 91 miles an hour, 26 more than the posted speed limit, according to a crash data recorder retrieved from the vehicle. State Police Superintendent Joseph R. Fuentes said yesterday that the trooper driving the vehicle, Robert J. Rasinski, told investigators he had not known how fast he was traveling as he led Corzine's two-car motorcade, with the vehicle's emergency lights flashing, from Atlantic City, where Corzine had given a speech, to a meeting at the governor's mansion in Princeton.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | January 17, 2007
"To care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan." There has never been a more succinct statement about the obligation and privilege the nation has to care for its military veterans than that brief clause in Abraham Lincoln's second Inaugural Address. But the New Jersey legislature thinks setting aside a day on which to remember those who have bought our freedom with their blood is not as important as it used to be. New Jersey legislators have unanimously passed a measure that includes a provision to remove the state mandate to teach about Veterans Day in the public schools.
NEWS
By TODD RICHISSIN and TODD RICHISSIN,SUN REPORTER | July 6, 2006
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- In Bally's Casino yesterday there was plenty of bling but no ring, zero ding. Lights were flashing like a carnival midway: Joker Poker signs were blinking - claiming to be just about definitely prepared to pay some lucky sap $4,125.39 - and the Slingo machines shined with their usual unfulfilled promises of riches. But the ca-chings were absent, the bloop-bloop-bloops of the slot machines mute, no silent prayers were answered with the crashing sound of shiny new quarters on shiny tin trays.
NEWS
By George F. Will | December 12, 1999
NEWARK, N.J. -- Jon Corzine, 52, grew up on a farm in Willie's Station, a suburb, so to speak, of Taylorville in central Illinois. He warmed the bench for the University of Illinois basketball team, graduated Phi Beta Kappa, earned a University of Chicago masters of business administration degree, wheedled an entry-level job from Goldman Sachs in 1975, profited from Ronald Reagan (public debt is a boon to bond traders), and in 1994 became chief executive officer.After losing a power struggle within the firm, he retired this year with $300 million and time on his hands.
NEWS
April 19, 2007
Sometimes, it's an official-looking limousine that blazes by you on the highway as though you were standing still, but Lincoln Town Cars and SUVs like the 2005 Chevy Suburban that carried New Jersey Gov. Jon S. Corzine are also common. Governor Corzine's fateful ride ended one week ago when his Suburban crashed on the Garden State Parkway and he was seriously injured. On Tuesday, officials revealed an important fact in the case: His state trooper-driven car was traveling 91 miles per hour.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | July 5, 2006
ARLINGTON, VA. -- A joke is on display in New Jersey, where the majority Democratic legislature and Gov. Jon "I promise not to raise your taxes" Corzine are in a fierce battle over the state budget, which last weekend led to a government shutdown reminiscent of the 1995-1996 closings of the federal government. A decade ago, it was a battle between a Republican Congress and a Democratic president. Now, in Trenton, it's a fight among Democrats over how much taxes should be raised (and which ones)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 5, 2006
TRENTON, N.J. -- Instead of heading to the beach or preparing for a backyard barbecue, New Jersey's 120 legislators were called to the State House yesterday by Gov. Jon S. Corzine, who urged them to resolve a budget stalemate that has led to a four-day government shutdown. But the day ended with the impasse worse than ever. After listening to the governor make a 30-minute appeal, in which Corzine emphasized his willingness to compromise with fellow Democrats in the Assembly over his proposal to increase the state sales tax, Speaker Joseph J. Roberts Jr. declared that the governor's plan could not pass.
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