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By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 6, 1992
CORREGIDOR, Philippines -- The white flag had replaced the Stars and Stripes over Corregidor when Gen. Jonathan Wainwright strode out of Malinta Tunnel, accompanied by his aides and his captors, on his way down to the beach to sign the United States' unconditional surrender of its only colony, the Philippines.Awaiting a fate far worse than most could ever imagine, American soldiers outside the tunnel watched their fiery commander emerge.One of them shouted, "Attention!" And the troops snapped ramrod straight in one final display of unity and discipline.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2011
Louis Sachwald, who spent 42 months as a prisoner of war during World War II after the fall of Bataan and Corregidor in the Philippines and survived slave labor camps, forced marches and "hell" ships, died Feb. 28 of dementia at the Charlotte Hall Veterans Home in Southern Maryland. The former Pikesville resident was 92. Mr. Sachwald was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and moved in 1934 with his family to Lancaster, Pa. After graduating from McCaskey High School in 1937, he earned a bachelor's degree in education in 1940 from Millersville State Teachers College.
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NEWS
May 15, 1992
In early May 1942, the United States had been at war for a harrowing six months. Disaster followed disaster in the Pacific as the U.S. fleet, gravely wounded at Pearl Harbor, proved unable to stop Japanese advances in the Philippines and elsewhere. The country was hungry for good news, and was not getting it.On May 6 came the punishing report came that Corregidor had fallen "after being pounded [as an Evening Sun editorial said] into helplessness by unceasing artillery fire and bombardment by air."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | November 8, 2007
Kenneth Alexander Boulier, a retired Navy code breaker who survived the Battle of Corregidor and was decorated for his work during World War II, died of cancer Sunday at his Glen Burnie home. He was 91. Born in Cedar Bluffs, Neb., he quit school during the Depression and hopped freight trains to see the country. He then enlisted in the Navy and was sent to a military cryptological school in Long Beach, Calif. He served aboard the USS Houston and the USS New Mexico, and was assigned to the Philippines during World War II. Family members said that in March 1942, he escaped from the island of Corregidor in the Philippines to Australia aboard the submarine USS Permit days before the Japanese took control of it. He was among the 40 officers and enlisted men, including code analysts from the Navy's Far East intelligence station.
NEWS
January 23, 1993
Michael S. BaerLumber mill ownerMichael Shellman Baer, a Baltimore native and the retired owner of a lumber mill in Bogalusa, La., died Wednesday of cancer at a hospital in Bogalusa.Mr. Baer, who was 77, retired 12 years ago as owner of the Halsey Hardwood Lumber Co., with which he had become associated in the late 1930s when he was sent to manage it at a time when it was part of a family lumber business in Baltimore.Born in Baltimore, Mr. Baer was a graduate of the Boys' Latin School.Services were to be conducted at 11 a.m. today at the First Presbyterian Church in Bogalusa.
NEWS
March 12, 2007
RICHARD S. PRATHER, 85 Mystery novelist Richard S. Prather, a novelist best known for his mysteries featuring private investigator Shell Scott, died Feb. 14 of complications from pulmonary disease at his home in Sedona, Ariz., author Linda Pendleton, a friend of Mr. Prather, said last week. Mr. Prather's Shell Scott mysteries of the 1950s and 1960s featured a Marine-turned-private eye who kept his hair in a military buzz cut and was missing part of an ear shot off during World War II. He also wrote several novels under the pseudonyms David Knight and Douglas Ring.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | April 22, 1994
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -- Enemy bombs pounded the city. American troops retreated from the invaders. At a yacht club on Manila Bay, Fontaine Porter Brownell and her husband waited for Japanese troops to march in and slaughter them in the early days of World War II.A GI separated from his unit conceived the idea of "liberating" a sailboat from the yacht club. As the boat moved through the oily water, passing sunken ships, Ms. Brownell looked back at the city."Manila was just in flames," said Ms. Brownell, 76, recalling the scene more than 50 years later.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2011
Louis Sachwald, who spent 42 months as a prisoner of war during World War II after the fall of Bataan and Corregidor in the Philippines and survived slave labor camps, forced marches and "hell" ships, died Feb. 28 of dementia at the Charlotte Hall Veterans Home in Southern Maryland. The former Pikesville resident was 92. Mr. Sachwald was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and moved in 1934 with his family to Lancaster, Pa. After graduating from McCaskey High School in 1937, he earned a bachelor's degree in education in 1940 from Millersville State Teachers College.
NEWS
By Ron Grossman and Ron Grossman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 2003
White is the color a soldier holds forth when he can no longer fight. It's the color the innocent wave to show this is not their fight, and please, please, do not shoot. It is a powerful symbol, a universally known appeal for the suffering to end. It is recognized by international law. The Geneva Conventions prohibit using a flag of truce as a ruse to get the other side to drop its guard. Yesterday in Iraq, that rule was apparently violated. Lt. Gen. John Abizaid of U.S. Central Command said a group of Iraqis near An Nasiriyah, a crossing point over the Euphrates River northwest of Basra, waved the white flag of surrender, then opened up with artillery fire.
SPORTS
By Bill Conlin and Bill Conlin,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | February 29, 1996
PHILADELPHIA -- Every man has his breaking point. The burning slivers of straw under the fingernails of Rutgers-Camden provost Walter K. Gordon were his basketball team. When the losing streak reached 108 to coincide with the end of the Pioneers' fifth straight winless season -- an 0-24 tour de farce -- Walt shrieked, "Enough, no more."Gordon didn't fire the coach. He fired the whole nonscholarship program.P. T. Barnum said, "There's a sucker born every minute."Henry Ford said, "History is bunk."
NEWS
March 12, 2007
RICHARD S. PRATHER, 85 Mystery novelist Richard S. Prather, a novelist best known for his mysteries featuring private investigator Shell Scott, died Feb. 14 of complications from pulmonary disease at his home in Sedona, Ariz., author Linda Pendleton, a friend of Mr. Prather, said last week. Mr. Prather's Shell Scott mysteries of the 1950s and 1960s featured a Marine-turned-private eye who kept his hair in a military buzz cut and was missing part of an ear shot off during World War II. He also wrote several novels under the pseudonyms David Knight and Douglas Ring.
NEWS
By Ron Grossman and Ron Grossman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 2003
White is the color a soldier holds forth when he can no longer fight. It's the color the innocent wave to show this is not their fight, and please, please, do not shoot. It is a powerful symbol, a universally known appeal for the suffering to end. It is recognized by international law. The Geneva Conventions prohibit using a flag of truce as a ruse to get the other side to drop its guard. Yesterday in Iraq, that rule was apparently violated. Lt. Gen. John Abizaid of U.S. Central Command said a group of Iraqis near An Nasiriyah, a crossing point over the Euphrates River northwest of Basra, waved the white flag of surrender, then opened up with artillery fire.
SPORTS
By Bill Conlin and Bill Conlin,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | February 29, 1996
PHILADELPHIA -- Every man has his breaking point. The burning slivers of straw under the fingernails of Rutgers-Camden provost Walter K. Gordon were his basketball team. When the losing streak reached 108 to coincide with the end of the Pioneers' fifth straight winless season -- an 0-24 tour de farce -- Walt shrieked, "Enough, no more."Gordon didn't fire the coach. He fired the whole nonscholarship program.P. T. Barnum said, "There's a sucker born every minute."Henry Ford said, "History is bunk."
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | April 22, 1994
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -- Enemy bombs pounded the city. American troops retreated from the invaders. At a yacht club on Manila Bay, Fontaine Porter Brownell and her husband waited for Japanese troops to march in and slaughter them in the early days of World War II.A GI separated from his unit conceived the idea of "liberating" a sailboat from the yacht club. As the boat moved through the oily water, passing sunken ships, Ms. Brownell looked back at the city."Manila was just in flames," said Ms. Brownell, 76, recalling the scene more than 50 years later.
NEWS
July 7, 1993
Retired Rear Adm. Charles Adair, who organized a 4,000-mile escape from Japanese forces during World War II, died Sunday of pneumonia at the Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 90.A longtime resident of Annapolis, Admiral Adair -- at the time a lieutenant -- organized the escape of a crew of 18 enlisted men and three officers from Corregidor on an 80-foot sailboat, the USS Lanikai, in 1941. The boat sailed into Tjilatiap, Java, in late February 1942 and then to Fremantle, Australia.Born in Tyler, Texas, Admiral Adair and his family moved to California in 1908.
NEWS
January 23, 1993
Michael S. BaerLumber mill ownerMichael Shellman Baer, a Baltimore native and the retired owner of a lumber mill in Bogalusa, La., died Wednesday of cancer at a hospital in Bogalusa.Mr. Baer, who was 77, retired 12 years ago as owner of the Halsey Hardwood Lumber Co., with which he had become associated in the late 1930s when he was sent to manage it at a time when it was part of a family lumber business in Baltimore.Born in Baltimore, Mr. Baer was a graduate of the Boys' Latin School.Services were to be conducted at 11 a.m. today at the First Presbyterian Church in Bogalusa.
NEWS
July 7, 1993
Retired Rear Adm. Charles Adair, who organized a 4,000-mile escape from Japanese forces during World War II, died Sunday of pneumonia at the Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 90.A longtime resident of Annapolis, Admiral Adair -- at the time a lieutenant -- organized the escape of a crew of 18 enlisted men and three officers from Corregidor on an 80-foot sailboat, the USS Lanikai, in 1941. The boat sailed into Tjilatiap, Java, in late February 1942 and then to Fremantle, Australia.Born in Tyler, Texas, Admiral Adair and his family moved to California in 1908.
NEWS
May 15, 1992
In early May 1942, the United States had been at war for a harrowing six months. Disaster followed disaster in the Pacific as the U.S. fleet, gravely wounded at Pearl Harbor, proved unable to stop Japanese advances in the Philippines and elsewhere. The country was hungry for good news, and was not getting it.On May 6 came the punishing report came that Corregidor had fallen "after being pounded [as an Evening Sun editorial said] into helplessness by unceasing artillery fire and bombardment by air."
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