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By Devon Spurgeon and Devon Spurgeon,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1999
An investigation of drug trafficking and gang violence at the maximum-security Maryland House of Correction has turned up a surprise -- inmates using cellular phones.Four cellular telephones and a watch with a pager attachment, apparently smuggled into the Jessup prison, were found in recent searches of areas used by convicts. Corrections officers found nearly 2 ounces of marijuana, a half-ounce of heroin and a third of an ounce of crack cocaine in the cell of one gang member, prison officials said.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 12, 1999
Two Patuxent Institution inmates were arrested in a stabbing yesterday at the prison that left another prisoner in serious condition, a state corrections official said.Warren James Courts, 20, formerly of the 3800 block of Cottage Ave. in Baltimore, was stabbed in the neck with a homemade knife, said Leonard A. Sipes Jr., a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services. Courts was in serious but stable condition last night at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1999
The personal ad looks like so many others posted on the World Wide Web these days: "I am a 30 year old white male with a heart of gold, who is seeking friendship and pen pals."A snapshot shows a man with an athletic, 6-foot frame, easy smile and boyishly handsome face.He's wearing what appear to be orange hospital scrubs and looks like a guy who would have no trouble eliciting a response from the opposite sex.But Samuel J. Derrick is not your typical lonely heart.He's a convicted killer who in 1987 stabbed a store owner 30 times during a robbery.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1997
Faced with a steadily growing population of violent criminals, Maryland's public safety chief is proposing construction of a nearly $50 million maximum-security prison for more than 500 inmates on the grounds of the state's Cumberland correctional complex.Bishop L. Robinson, the secretary of public safety, told legislators yesterday that he is asking Gov. Parris N. Glendening to scrap plans to build a $13 million medium-security unit at Cumberland.Instead, Robinson said, he has asked the governor to budget $2.5 million in his fiscal 1999 budget to begin planning and designing a 512-cell facility at the Western Correctional Institution to house violent criminals.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1997
State correctional officials plan to open the doors of the Maryland House of Correction Annex in Jessup today to allow some visitors in to see inmates -- the second step in their move to lift a lockdown that resulted from a melee there last month.Officials plan to bring 15 additional correctional officers and an officer with a police dog from other Maryland prisons to the annex for increased security during the visits. Each inmate will be escorted by two officers, officials said.Because of the time-consuming security measures, some inmates might not see visitors today and will have to wait until tomorrow, officials said.
NEWS
April 23, 1997
Sheriff's Deputy 1st Class Walter Royster, an Army retiree who joined the Detention Center staff nearly two years ago, was selected as Carroll County's Correctional Officer of the Year.Royster, 44, spent 22 years in Army intelligence before retiring as a master sergeant.He lives in Westminster with Rita, his wife of 27 years.Royster worked directly with prisoners as a line officer until last week.On Monday,he began a new assignment as coordinator of the Detention Center's work-release program.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | May 19, 1996
FIVE YEARS AGO, some of the last inmates from the Maryland Penitentiary's notorious South Wing crossed Madison Street to a high-technology prison of the future, bidding goodbye to 19th-century quarters that had famously been dubbed the "innermost circle of hell."But now that new prison -- the Maryland Correctional Adjustment Center, better known as "Supermax," designed as the ultimate control unit for the state's most incorrigible prisoners -- is itself being painted as hell of a different sort.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | June 14, 1995
In the heat of summer, Maryland officials are snuffing out one of the few pleasures a state prisoner may still enjoy in his cell -- smoking.Starting July 1, inmates will no longer be allowed to light up anywhere inside the state's 24 prisons, according to a directive issued by Bishop L. Robinson, secretary of the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.The policy was instituted to comply with the statewide workplace smoking ban that went into effect in March. Prison officials filed for a variance to the ban several months ago to buy time to work out a policy and get inmates used to the idea.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | September 26, 1994
New tough-on-crime laws that take effect Saturday could double or triple the number of convicts under 18 in Maryland's adult correctional system and require at least one major new prison in the next several years, officials say.Beginning Oct. 1, youths over 16 who are charged with any of about 20 additional crimes will be treated as adults. Adults convicted of a second violent felony will have to serve at least 10 years in prison, and violent offenders will have to serve at least half their sentences before parole.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | January 12, 1993
If you think that crime in America is spiraling hopelessly out of control, spend some time with Lawrence Greenfeld.Mr. Greenfeld, a soft-spoken bespectacled man, lives in Columbia and works for the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics in Washington.He has some good news and the numbers to back it up.Consider:* The violent crime rate in the nation actually fell from about 34 victims per 1,000 people in 1982 to about 31 per 1,000 in 1991.* The percentage of households experiencing crime steadily decreased, from 32.1 percent in 1975 to 23.7 percent in 1991.
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