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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 4, 1999
In a move to improve security at Maryland correctional institutions, inmates serving life terms who have an escape history have been transferred to more secure facilities.As of July 28, said Commissioner of Correction William W. Sondervan, 52 of 73 inmates whose records were reviewed have been transferred to the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup, the Roxbury Correctional Institution at Hagerstown or the Western Correctional Institution in Cumberland.The action followed the recent escape of two inmates from the Maryland Correctional Institution at Jessup, Sondervan said.
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NEWS
December 3, 2013
We are told the state has wrested back control of the troubled Baltimore City Detention Center ( "Baltimore BGF jail smuggling case hits 19 more suspects," Nov. 21). According to Gov. Martin O'Malley, since April the state has redoubled efforts to crack down on corruption and improve security at the correctional institution. But what about the period before April? I recall the governor spending a lot of time on the Sunday morning talk shows. If he had spent less time in front of the cameras and more time doing the tedious work of running the state, he might have averted some of these problems.
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NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | January 17, 2008
A man serving multiple life sentences for killing four people, including two pregnant women, in Baltimore County in 1987 tried to escape early yesterday from a maximum-security prison in Jessup but was caught by correctional officers as he tried to scale a fence, according to prison officials. Rico Marzano, who turned 40 Saturday, ran from a building at the Jessup Correctional Institution about 5 a.m. He tried to climb a security fence, which is topped with razor wire, corrections officials said.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 26, 2008
The inmate claims officers at the Maryland Correctional Institute at Hagerstown tortured him physically and mentally, and then denied him the medication he needed to lower his high blood pressure. "I am writing because I am going through racial cruel and unusual punishment," Michael Vaughn wrote in a letter postmarked July 2. "Since I've been on J-1 [a disciplinary segregation section of the prison] I've been called [racial and other epithets]. I've been choked unconscious with handcuffs on, I've had my meals took for five days, I've had a plastic shield in front of my cell which blocks air from coming in my cell."
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2005
A federal judge has set a hearing for June 15 to consider the state's request that he overturn a $45,001 jury award to an inmate who alleged that he was assaulted by correctional officers. At the hearing, U.S. District Judge Richard D. Bennett will consider the state's motions that he set aside the jury verdict, order a new trial or reduce the monetary damages that the federal jury in Baltimore awarded to Norman R. Willis, 37. The jury, in a rare finding against the prison system, concluded in October that two Western Correctional Institution officers violated Willis' rights by assaulting him and slamming his head against the wall while he was handcuffed.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | July 31, 1991
The warden at the Maryland prison that has been locked down since inmates rioted last May will be reassigned at his own request, corrections officials said.Mason W. Waters, warden of the Maryland Correctional Institution near Hagerstown, will begin working temporarily at Division of Correction headquarters in Baltimore, according to Gregory M. Shipley, a prison system spokesman.Waters requested the reassignment 2 1/2 weeks ago, Shipley said.Fifty-eight inmates and correctional officers were injured in the MCI-H riot, which caused property damage estimated at $1.5 million.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,sun reporter | May 17, 2007
Less than a year after taking over as Maryland's prisons chief, John A. Rowley says he plans to step down to become warden of a maximum-security prison near Cumberland. Rowley said yesterday that he sought the change for "quality of life" reasons. Overseeing the state's 26 prisons and staff of 7,400, he said, was a time-consuming job that had became too disruptive to his family life. Public Safety Secretary Gary D. Maynard praised Rowley's performance and said he will remain the acting commissioner of correction until a suitable replacement can be found.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2005
A federal judge dismissed yesterday a complaint by a prison inmate who had claimed that he was harassed and beaten by correctional officers at the Eastern Correctional Institution. The judge threw out the complaint at the request of inmate Kerry Woodard's lawyer. The lawyer, Joseph B. Tetrault, would not say yesterday why he filed a motion seeking voluntary dismissal of the complaint. Woodard had claimed that he was beaten by officers at ECI because he had been a witness in the death of another prisoner and had talked to investigators about the actions of officers.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | October 13, 1994
The candles burned brightly on the altar as the 15 Lutheran worshipers lowered their heads and prayed. After a unanimous amen, the men's heads straightened and they began to read the Bible and sing "Jesus, Remember Me.""The theme for this evening kind of picks up from last week when Jesus announced to the world that he was the bread of life," the Rev. Charles Robert Frederick told the men. "When God fills us with his spirit, we have new purpose for our lives."The Lutheran pastor's sermon and the chapel's decorations resembled many other churches.
NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | July 31, 1991
HAGERSTOWN -- While a probe continues into the causes of the May 25 inmate uprising at the Maryland Correctional Institution at Hagerstown, the warden of the riot-torn prison has been transferred to an administrative position, state corrections officials said yesterday.Mason Waters, who was warden at MCI at Hagerstown for more than two years, will be replaced by Lloyd L. Waters, who is warden at the neighboring Maryland Correctional Training Center in Hagerstown, said Sgt. Gregory M. Shipley, corrections spokesman.
NEWS
By Sally Dworak-Fisher | April 24, 2008
While awaiting trial nearly three years ago, Raymond Smoot was beaten to death by correctional officers at Baltimore's Central Booking and Intake Facility. His death prompted an FBI investigation, City Council hearings and a bill to create a prison violence task force. But three years after cries of "never again," the task force has not yet convened, and recent reports suggest that Maryland's prisons inflict punishments beyond what any judge or jury might imagine. It's time to take meaningful steps to shine the light of public scrutiny on Maryland's jails and prisons.
NEWS
April 11, 2008
Not since guards beat three inmates in the decrepit south wing of the old Maryland Penitentiary in 1981 have assaults on prisoners generated so much attention. Then, the beatings and a cover-up led to an investigation by the attorney general of Maryland and a scathing indictment of prison conditions. Now, inmate beatings at two Western Maryland prisons have resulted in the firing of 25 officers and a continuing state police probe. Public Safety Secretary Gary D. Maynard acted swiftly to clean house, but the investigation needs to go as far as it can to ensure the safety of prisoners and officers.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Greg Garland and Gus G. Sentementes and Greg Garland,Sun reporter | April 10, 2008
With 25 correctional officers facing termination or already fired, a probe that began last month into whether they beat inmates at two Western Maryland prisons has grown into one of the most extensive investigations in years for the state penal system. Detectives are working with state police and local prosecutors investigating several encounters between inmates and officers in early March at the Roxbury Correctional Institution in Hagerstown and the North Branch Correctional Institution in Cumberland.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | April 5, 2008
Nine correctional officers at a medium-security prison in Hagerstown were fired yesterday amid allegations that they assaulted an inmate last month, according to a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services. The nine officers, who worked at the Roxbury Correctional Institution, plan to appeal the decision, according to the union representing correctional officers in the state of Maryland. "These mass firings are a reckless rush to judgment on the state's part," said Joe Lawrence, spokesman for American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | March 28, 2008
State prison officials said yesterday they have launched a criminal investigation into allegations that eight correctional officers assaulted several inmates at a maximum-security prison - the second case of possible abuse to emerge at a Western Maryland prison this month. The officers from the North Branch Correctional Institution in Cumberland have been placed on administrative leave and face possible termination, prison officials said yesterday. The Maryland State Police are leading a criminal inquiry into the case, prison authorities said.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | January 17, 2008
A man serving multiple life sentences for killing four people, including two pregnant women, in Baltimore County in 1987 tried to escape early yesterday from a maximum-security prison in Jessup but was caught by correctional officers as he tried to scale a fence, according to prison officials. Rico Marzano, who turned 40 Saturday, ran from a building at the Jessup Correctional Institution about 5 a.m. He tried to climb a security fence, which is topped with razor wire, corrections officials said.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | August 24, 2006
The commissioner of the Maryland Division of Correction retired yesterday amid continuing turmoil over the state's troubled prisons and the slayings of two correctional officers by inmates this year. Frank C. Sizer Jr., 62, delivered his resignation in the form of a two weeks' notice yesterday afternoon to Public Safety and Correctional Services Secretary Mary Ann Saar, said Jacqueline Lampell, her spokeswoman. "He simply told the secretary he was retiring," Lampell said. "I can't comment on her response.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | January 2, 1992
The state prison system ended the year the way it started -- overcrowded, despite adding almost 1,700 new beds for prisoners.The state prison population grew by almost 100 each month in 1991, ending the year at 18,770."
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,Sun reporter | December 3, 2007
Cresaptown -- Amid the scenic mountains of Western Maryland looms a forbidding fortress of a prison designed with one goal in mind - keeping the state's most violent and disruptive criminals inside, and under complete control. North Branch Correctional Institution, a state-of-the-art maximum-security prison just south of Cumberland, has been opening in phases since 2003 and will double in size to hold up to 1,400 inmates when two more housing units open next year. The high-tech prison - which will cost $171 million when completed - is taking inmates from aging facilities such as the House of Correction in Jessup, which was shut down in March after months of relentless violence.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | September 14, 2007
The publication, sent to an inmate at the Eastern Correctional Institution, includes a cartoon of a black woman drawn to resemble an ape. Next to her, a white man in a suit makes a racist remark about her hair. One look at it and the prison's warden instituted a ban on the monthly newsletter, which is produced by the Nationalist Movement, a white supremacist group based in Learned, Miss. "You have a very diverse population behind prison walls and, if this were to get out, it could pose some sort of a security issue, if people get their feathers ruffled over it," said Rosa Cruz, a spokeswoman for the prison system.
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