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NEWS
April 23, 1997
Sheriff's Deputy 1st Class Walter Royster, an Army retiree who joined the Detention Center staff nearly two years ago, was selected as Carroll County's Correctional Officer of the Year.Royster, 44, spent 22 years in Army intelligence before retiring as a master sergeant.He lives in Westminster with Rita, his wife of 27 years.Royster worked directly with prisoners as a line officer until last week.On Monday,he began a new assignment as coordinator of the Detention Center's work-release program.
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NEWS
February 18, 2010
T here's a growing sense among the nation's correctional institutions that the most dangerous contraband being smuggled into prisons isn't drugs, and it's not weapons. It's cell phones. They're turning up by the thousands in prison cells in Maryland and across the nation, and they're being used to coordinate criminal activity behind bars and on the outside. One of the most famous cases was the 2007 murder of Rosedale man Carl Lackl, who was a witness to another killing. A week before Mr. Lackl was to testify, the defendant in that case, Steven Byers, arranged his murder from behind bars, using a contraband cell phone.
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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1997
State correctional officials plan to open the doors of the Maryland House of Correction Annex in Jessup today to allow some visitors in to see inmates -- the second step in their move to lift a lockdown that resulted from a melee there last month.Officials plan to bring 15 additional correctional officers and an officer with a police dog from other Maryland prisons to the annex for increased security during the visits. Each inmate will be escorted by two officers, officials said.Because of the time-consuming security measures, some inmates might not see visitors today and will have to wait until tomorrow, officials said.
NEWS
March 14, 2008
Three correctional officers assigned to the Roxbury Correctional Institution at Hagerstown in Western Maryland could face termination amid allegations of using excessive force against inmates, the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services said yesterday. The names of and specific allegations against the officers were withheld because of the continuing investigation. The disciplinary action stemmed from an incident last week, said spokesman Rick Binetti. He declined to describe what happened.
NEWS
March 14, 2008
Three correctional officers assigned to the Roxbury Correctional Institution at Hagerstown in Western Maryland could face termination amid allegations of using excessive force against inmates, the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services said yesterday. The names of and specific allegations against the officers were withheld because of the continuing investigation. The disciplinary action stemmed from an incident last week, said spokesman Rick Binetti. He declined to describe what happened.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 30, 1992
MILLEDGEVILLE, Ga. -- Outside, the prison resemble nothing so much as a low-lying suburban office park or a modern middle school. It sits in a wooded area far off the main road south of Milledgeville, a central Georgia town of antebellum mansions and a distinctly Southern air.Five prisons are clustered here, not counting a youth detention facility, making the care and feeding of convicts the economic lifeblood of the area. In such a setting, the Georgia Women's Correctional Institution is an utterly unremarkable presence.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | May 19, 1996
FIVE YEARS AGO, some of the last inmates from the Maryland Penitentiary's notorious South Wing crossed Madison Street to a high-technology prison of the future, bidding goodbye to 19th-century quarters that had famously been dubbed the "innermost circle of hell."But now that new prison -- the Maryland Correctional Adjustment Center, better known as "Supermax," designed as the ultimate control unit for the state's most incorrigible prisoners -- is itself being painted as hell of a different sort.
NEWS
June 1, 2005
BALTIMORE Inmate who died had sought OK to take walk, lawyer says Inmate Raymond K. Smoot was trying to talk a guard into letting him make up for missed exercise time in the moments before a fatal altercation with officers, an attorney representing his family says. Attorney A. Dwight Pettit has interviewed witnesses to the May 14 incident at the state-run Baltimore Central Booking and Intake Center as part of a wrongful-death lawsuit he plans to file against the state. An internal investigation by the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services is in its third week, and six correctional officers remain on paid administrative leave.
NEWS
February 1, 1991
More prison bedsState corrections officials have decided to add at least 500 more beds to a proposed state prison in Western Maryland.A prison population projected to grow from 17,554 to 25,000 by the mid-1990s pointed to a need to expand the proposed minimum- and medium-security prison to at least 3,000 beds, said Leonard Sipes, a spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.The Schaefer administration has included $3.5 million in its proposed 1992 capital budget to design and buy land for the facility, which will likely be located in Allegany County.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2005
Prison authorities are investigating whether heroin smuggled into the Roxbury Correctional Institution in Hagerstown sickened or caused strange behavior in five inmates. Three of the inmates were taken to a local hospital after they were discovered unresponsive in their cells Tuesday, according to Priscilla Doggett, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Division of Correction. She said test results have confirmed that drugs were in the system of two of the inmates. The test results of the other three inmates are pending, she said.
NEWS
March 6, 2008
For those who had any doubts about the need to shut down the Maryland House of Correction last year, a hearing this week in an Anne Arundel County Circuit Court should convince them it was the right decision. Lawyers for two inmates charged in the murder of Correctional Officer David McGuinn are trying to show that a culture of corruption inside the Jessup prison contributed to the guard's death. And prison investigative reports they have received so far allege misconduct that went beyond a few insiders.
NEWS
December 20, 2007
Colleagues of slain Maryland Correctional Officer David W. McGuinn have done his memory a disservice. In trying to explain away the beating of an inmate, they may have seriously compromised an investigation into the officer's murder. Add to that the slipshod handling of a piece of evidence, and the prosecution's job of convicting his accused killers becomes exceedingly harder. That's no formula for justice. The aftermath of Officer McGuinn's July 25, 2006 death at the House of Correction in Jessup was a chaotic and dangerous affair, as reported by The Sun's Greg Garland.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | June 24, 2007
WASHINGTON -- With swelling prison populations cutting into state budgets, lawmakers are exploring ways to ease overcrowding beyond building expensive new correctional facilities. Though the construction of prisons continues as states struggle to provide enough beds for those behind bars, legislators increasingly are looking at other ways to free up space and save money, including expanded programs to help prevent offenders from being incarcerated again, earlier release dates for low-risk inmates and sentencing revisions.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Greg Garland and Josh Mitchell and Greg Garland,sun reporters | March 18, 2007
State officials have abruptly shut down the Maryland House of Correction, an antiquated and notorious maximum-security prison in Jessup where inmate violence had spiraled out of control and corruption had run rampant. Prison administrators had planned to convert the 128-year-old prison - where a correctional officer and three inmates have been killed within the past year - to a minimum-security facility in coming months. But the state's top correctional official said yesterday that he began laying plans to close the prison within hours of the non-fatal March 2 stabbing of a correctional officer there.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Ruma Kumar and Gus G. Sentementes and Ruma Kumar,Sun reporter | March 3, 2007
An inmate wounded a correctional officer with a homemade knife yesterday inside the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup, and Gov. Martin O'Malley and prison officials responded by vowing to move swiftly to improve staffing and security within the troubled system. The officer was attempting to put an inmate back in his cell when the man turned and stabbed him seven times in the upper body, prison officials said. The 28-year-old officer had been on the job since November; the 38-year-old inmate, whose name was withheld, is serving a life sentence for murder, officials said.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
Amid the steady flow of drugs, tobacco, cell phones and other contraband at the Maryland House of Corrections, officers who strictly enforce the rules end up putting targets on their backs, say former inmates and those who have worked in the Jessup prison. Officer David McGuinn, who was not one to look the other way, was stabbed to death last week by inmates who, according to colleagues, considered his diligence an annoying burden. Since March, three inmates were stabbed to death and two officers were wounded with homemade knives.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 12, 1999
Two Patuxent Institution inmates were arrested in a stabbing yesterday at the prison that left another prisoner in serious condition, a state corrections official said.Warren James Courts, 20, formerly of the 3800 block of Cottage Ave. in Baltimore, was stabbed in the neck with a homemade knife, said Leonard A. Sipes Jr., a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services. Courts was in serious but stable condition last night at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Ruma Kumar and Gus G. Sentementes and Ruma Kumar,Sun reporter | March 3, 2007
An inmate wounded a correctional officer with a homemade knife yesterday inside the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup, and Gov. Martin O'Malley and prison officials responded by vowing to move swiftly to improve staffing and security within the troubled system. The officer was attempting to put an inmate back in his cell when the man turned and stabbed him seven times in the upper body, prison officials said. The 28-year-old officer had been on the job since November; the 38-year-old inmate, whose name was withheld, is serving a life sentence for murder, officials said.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2005
Prison authorities are investigating whether heroin smuggled into the Roxbury Correctional Institution in Hagerstown sickened or caused strange behavior in five inmates. Three of the inmates were taken to a local hospital after they were discovered unresponsive in their cells Tuesday, according to Priscilla Doggett, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Division of Correction. She said test results have confirmed that drugs were in the system of two of the inmates. The test results of the other three inmates are pending, she said.
NEWS
June 1, 2005
BALTIMORE Inmate who died had sought OK to take walk, lawyer says Inmate Raymond K. Smoot was trying to talk a guard into letting him make up for missed exercise time in the moments before a fatal altercation with officers, an attorney representing his family says. Attorney A. Dwight Pettit has interviewed witnesses to the May 14 incident at the state-run Baltimore Central Booking and Intake Center as part of a wrongful-death lawsuit he plans to file against the state. An internal investigation by the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services is in its third week, and six correctional officers remain on paid administrative leave.
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