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By Gilbert Sandler | August 9, 1994
THESE ARE tough times for many inner-city churches, particularly the 16 Catholic churches targeted for reorganization or closure by the Archdiocese of Baltimore.Shrinking congregations leave many unable to afford to maintain their buildings, some of which are more than a century old.However, at least one venerable city Catholic church stands out as an example to others that it is possible to go through troubled times and survive. That church is the 103-year-old Corpus Christi, located on West Lafayette Avenue in Bolton Hill.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
BOWIE -- The Orioles made a surprise move by sending right-hander Bud Norris to Double-A Bowie so he could get work in over the All-Star break. Because he had made just one start since coming off the disabled list with a right groin strain, the organization wanted to get Norris back into a midseason rhythm for the second half. But pitching under the summer sun in an 11:05 a.m. game against the Richmond Flying Squirrels in front of a sparse crowd at Prince George's Stadium on Monday was a challenge.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 30, 2002
When Terrence McNally's Corpus Christi had its debut in New York in 1998, it was met with bomb threats and protests. In London a year later, it managed to offend a Muslim clergyman, who issued a fatwa against the playwright for blasphemy. Now the controversial play is making its Baltimore debut at the unprepossessing but ever-plucky Audrey Herman Spotlighters Theatre - the same place that introduced Baltimore to David Hare's bare-it-all Blue Room and, just a year ago, Paul Rudnick's gay-creation comedy, The Most Fabulous Story Ever Told.
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
Since his freshman year, Emmanuel Toney has told anyone at Annapolis Area Christian School who would listen that he planned on playing college basketball at a Division I school in Texas. Now that the 6-foot-2, 185-pound combo guard is a Texas A&M-Corpus Christi commitment, life has felt “kind of surreal.” “My recruitment was going slow for awhile,” said Toney, who pledged to the Islanders last month. “I had some looks, DII and DIII, and a couple DI. And then this year, it was just like, I don't want to say a miracle, but my hard work paid off. [The coaches]
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1998
What would happen if Jesus Christ had been born a gay man in Corpus Christi, Texas, during the 1960s?A new play that tries to answer that question has touched off the latest salvo in what has been dubbed the "culture wars" between liberal and conservative advocates.But unlike earlier controversies, which most often occurred in relatively out-of-the-way venues or provincial cities, last week's shot was in New York, the culture capital of the country, where playwright Terrence McNally's "Corpus Christi" opened amid street protests, heightened security and -- given all the hoopla -- surprisingly lukewarm reviews.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporter | September 23, 2005
CORPUS CHRISTI, TEXAS -- Becky Moreno has seen her neighborhood in water up to her knees after some storms. Neighbors' chickens have drowned in the floodwaters. And she has seen yards so full of water that parents had to carry their children to the road -- when the winding, gravel, rutted paths that serve as roads in these parts were still passable -- to catch the school bus. So when the 51-year-old woman heard that a Category 5 hurricane was headed her way, she felt certain that the trailer she has called home for seven years and all her family's belongings would be gone.
NEWS
August 22, 2004
On August 20, 2004, KATHARINE GILLET MATTHEWS; beloved wife of the late William Wall Matthews, Jr.; loving mother of William Wall Matthews III and his wife Wendy; devoted grandmother of Jesse and Dylan Matthews. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at the Corpus Christi Roman Catholic Church, corner of Mt. Royal and Lafayette, on Monday at 1 P.M. Interment Greenmount Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, Memorials in Mrs. Matthews' name to the Corpus Christi Church, 110 W. Lafayette Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21207 would be appreciated.
FEATURES
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 17, 1998
Back then, when he came with his young wife and daughter to live in a little New Jersey town, Frank Sinatra wasn't "Chairman of the Board." He was a skinny boy singer, just starting to lay the foundation of his enduring show-business legend.In the 1940s, Sinatra, who died Thursday at 82, was "The Voice," the kid from Hoboken who had the bobby-soxers screaming and swooning in the aisles at the Paramount Theater on Times Square in New York.In 1941, he was named the country's most popular vocalist.
NEWS
June 1, 2005
Mable T. George, a retired city public schools worker and soup kitchen volunteer, died of heart failure May 25 at her Sutton Place apartment. The former longtime resident of Reservoir Hill was 86. Born in Lee County, S.C., she moved to South Baltimore with her family in 1930. She attended St. Monica's parochial school, and during World War II was an administrator at the Curtis Bay Ordnance Depot. Miss George was a custodian and food worker in city schools for 30 years. She retired in 1983 from Edgecombe Circle Elementary, where she had spent most of her career, family members said.
NEWS
June 6, 1997
Dennis James, 79, one of television's first emcees and the host of such game shows as "The Price Is Right" and "Name That Tune," died of cancer Tuesday in Palm Springs, Calif.Among his firsts, according to reference books, was first host of a TV variety show, first host of a TV sports show, first emcee of the Easter Parade telecast, first on-the-spot live TV newsreel commentator, first TV wrestling announcer and first to appear on videotape for commercial use.George Fenneman, 77, the gracious sidekick to comedian Groucho Marx on television's "You Bet Your Life," died from emphysema May 29 in Los Angeles.
NEWS
January 26, 2007
Webster Leitch Rouse, owner of a process-serving agency, died of a heart attack Jan. 17 at his Towson home. The former longtime Bolton Hill resident was 66. Mr. Rouse was born in Baltimore and raised in the Bolton Hill neighborhood. He attended Boys' Latin School and began his career in the legal services industry in the early 1960s with Credit Adjustment Bureau of Baltimore. In 1981, he established Rouse, Low Associates with partner Richard C. Low to serve court summonses and assist creditors in the collection of unpaid debts.
NEWS
By JAMES GERSTENZANG and JAMES GERSTENZANG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush broke his public silence yesterday about Vice President Dick Cheney's shooting of a hunting companion, declaring that Cheney had delivered "a very strong and powerful explanation" of the incident. The sheriff's office looking into the shooting said it had ended its investigation and no charges would be filed. Bush said he had no complaints with the manner in which Cheney handled the disclosure of the shooting, which came a day after the incident occurred. But asked whether he was "satisfied with the timing," the president said: "I'm satisfied with the explanation he gave."
NEWS
By MARK SILVA | February 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A hunting companion was recuperating from shotgun pellet wounds to his face, neck and chest yesterday after Vice President Dick Cheney accidentally shot the man during a weekend quail hunt on one of Texas' biggest ranches, according to the rancher and the vice president's office. Harry Whittington, 78, an Austin attorney, was "alert and doing fine" after Cheney "peppered" him with birdshot Saturday afternoon at the Armstrong Ranch in South Texas, according to friend and ranch owner Katharine Armstrong, a leading fundraiser for the Bush-Cheney election campaigns.
SPORTS
By HEATHER A. DINICH and HEATHER A. DINICH,SUN REPORTER | January 5, 2006
COLLEGE PARK -- With a 30-point lead and five minutes remaining in last night's game, all five of Maryland's starters took a seat on the bench and put on their red warm-up jerseys. For the second game in a row, they were no longer needed. No. 14 Maryland@Miami Saturday, noon, Ch. 54, 1300 AM, 105.7 FM
SPORTS
By HEATHER A. DINICH and HEATHER A. DINICH,SUN REPORTER | January 4, 2006
COLLEGE PARK -- The men's basketball program at Texas A&M-Corpus Christi is only seven seasons old, plays an independent schedule, and is part of a small school of about 8,500 students. In a short time, though, the Islanders have had enough big accomplishments to be regarded by No. 14-ranked Maryland as "definitely a team you have to take seriously." Over the past five seasons, Islanders coach Ronnie Arrow has led his program to wins over teams such as Texas Tech, Texas A&M, and more recently, Florida State.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporter | September 23, 2005
CORPUS CHRISTI, TEXAS -- Becky Moreno has seen her neighborhood in water up to her knees after some storms. Neighbors' chickens have drowned in the floodwaters. And she has seen yards so full of water that parents had to carry their children to the road -- when the winding, gravel, rutted paths that serve as roads in these parts were still passable -- to catch the school bus. So when the 51-year-old woman heard that a Category 5 hurricane was headed her way, she felt certain that the trailer she has called home for seven years and all her family's belongings would be gone.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2000
One day in December, 13 years ago, Bishop John H. Ricard phoned Sister Jane Coyle with a request that left her speechless. Instead of assigning a priest to pastor Corpus Christi Roman Catholic Church in Bolton Hill, he told her that Archbishop William D. Borders wanted her to take the job. "I was stunned. My first reaction was I didn't think I could do it," she said. "It just never occurred to me in God's earth that I would do something like this." She found she could do it and do it well, as the parish thrived and grew under her leadership.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 8, 1995
HOUSTON -- Jury selection begins tomorrow in the trial of Yolanda Saldivar, who is accused of fatally shooting Selena, the Tejano music star whose death at age 23 catapulted her into the realm of cultural icon.Officials say security measures will be extensive for the trial, which was moved to Houston because of publicity in Corpus Christi, the late singer's hometown and the place where she was gunned down March 31."Ms. Saldivar is classified as a high-risk or maximum-custody inmate," said Maj. Mark Kellar of the Harris County Sheriff's Department, adding that she is being kept away from other inmates in the county jail.
NEWS
June 1, 2005
Mable T. George, a retired city public schools worker and soup kitchen volunteer, died of heart failure May 25 at her Sutton Place apartment. The former longtime resident of Reservoir Hill was 86. Born in Lee County, S.C., she moved to South Baltimore with her family in 1930. She attended St. Monica's parochial school, and during World War II was an administrator at the Curtis Bay Ordnance Depot. Miss George was a custodian and food worker in city schools for 30 years. She retired in 1983 from Edgecombe Circle Elementary, where she had spent most of her career, family members said.
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