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January 17, 1997
In the Today section of yesterday's Sun, a story about a new general manager at WJHU-FM (88.1) incorrectly reported the status of former general manager Dennis Kita. Kita left WJHU in July for a position with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 1/17/97
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NEWS
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,Los Angeles Times | April 15, 2007
NEW YORK -- America at a Crossroads did not get off to an auspicious start. From the beginning, the ambitious $20 million effort to examine the complexities of the post-Sept. 11 world through a series of documentaries - an initiative of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the private nonprofit organization that distributes federal funds to public television and radio - was greeted with skepticism. Independent producers and local station programmers, alarmed that CPB officials at the time were agitating for more conservatives on the air, feared the venture was driven by a political agenda.
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NEWS
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,Los Angeles Times | April 15, 2007
NEW YORK -- America at a Crossroads did not get off to an auspicious start. From the beginning, the ambitious $20 million effort to examine the complexities of the post-Sept. 11 world through a series of documentaries - an initiative of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the private nonprofit organization that distributes federal funds to public television and radio - was greeted with skepticism. Independent producers and local station programmers, alarmed that CPB officials at the time were agitating for more conservatives on the air, feared the venture was driven by a political agenda.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 4, 2005
Kenneth Y. Tomlinson, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting board member who in May charged PBS with liberal bias, abruptly resigned yesterday in the face of an internal investigative report that is expected to charge him with using questionable tactics and trying to undermine the political independence of public television and radio. Tomlinson, who was chairman of the CPB board when he made the allegations, stepped down from that post last month when his term expired - but only after hand-picking a successor, as well as a new president of CPB who was a former Republican official.
NEWS
By David Boaz | June 27, 2005
WASHINGTON - Congressional Republicans cut funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which funds public radio and television stations. After having their fun, they then agreed to restore most of the money and dropped their threat to eventually phase out all taxpayer funding. But they shouldn't back down. In fact, they should finish the job: End all taxpayer funding for government broadcasting stations and let them compete in the marketplace like other broadcasters. In a 500-channel world, why do the taxpayers need to subsidize one more channel?
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 4, 2005
Kenneth Y. Tomlinson, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting board member who in May charged PBS with liberal bias, abruptly resigned yesterday in the face of an internal investigative report that is expected to charge him with using questionable tactics and trying to undermine the political independence of public television and radio. Tomlinson, who was chairman of the CPB board when he made the allegations, stepped down from that post last month when his term expired - but only after hand-picking a successor, as well as a new president of CPB who was a former Republican official.
NEWS
December 16, 1994
Will the new Republican majority in Congress pull the plug on public television and radio?Incoming House Speaker Newt Gingrich says he wants to eliminate federal funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which distributes some $285 million annually to hundreds of local public television and radio stations across the country. He says the explosion of cable TV stations and niche radio has eliminated the need for federal funding of public television and radio.That argument confuses quantity with quality.
FEATURES
By Bob Dart and Bob Dart,Cox News Service | January 20, 1995
*TC Despite warnings that the survival of small non-commercial TV and radio stations is at stake, Republican congressional leaders sounded determined yesterday to reduce or eliminate federal funding for public broadcasting.At a budgetary hearing, House Appropriations Committee Chairman Bob Livingston, R-La., said virtually all government programs face fiscal scrutiny and all but essential spending will be cut."The Corporation for Public Broadcasting is one such unnecessary program," echoed California Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, a Republican.
NEWS
By Anthony S. Brandon | June 6, 2005
THE CONTROVERSY over recent actions by the chair of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting might not be so disturbing if the organization were not engaging in the exact kind of political interference it was designed to prevent. Kenneth Y. Tomlinson, who has quietly headed CPB for 18 months, recently emerged with an agenda that includes hiring monitors to find examples of liberal bias on public affairs shows, appointing ombudsmen to carry out further monitoring and making thinly veiled threats to pull funding for shows that don't meet his fairness criteria.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2005
The turmoil over whether the top echelon of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting has been tainted by political partisanship took a fresh turn yesterday. CPB's inspector general, who among other duties oversees questions of ethics within the organization, plans to investigate whether chairman Kenneth Y. Tomlinson acted appropriately in selecting a new CPB president. Both Tomlinson and the new president, Patricia Harrison, are prominent Republicans. The inspector general, Kenneth A. Konz, had already embarked on a probe of Tomlinson's decision to spend more than $14,000 of taxpayers' money to hire Republican lobbyists and consultants to advise him on working with Congress and to study the political bent of public broadcasting, particularly Now With Bill Moyers on PBS. Last month's appointment of Harrison, a former co-chair of the Republican National Committee, raised eyebrows among Democratic members of Congress and supporters of public broadcasting, who feared that it was part of a GOP effort to shift the Public Broadcasting Service, National Public Radio and other public broadcasters to the right.
NEWS
By Matea Gold and Johanna Neuman and Matea Gold and Johanna Neuman,Los Angeles Times | September 27, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Kenneth Y. Tomlinson, who led a charge against what he called the liberal slant in public broadcasting, ended his tumultuous two-year term as Chairman of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting yesterday, yielding the gavel to another Republican appointee with similar views if not a similar style. "I've enjoyed about as much of this as i can stand," Tomlinson said as he convened the last meeting of his tenure as chairman, one of the most divisive chapters in the corporation's 38-year history.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2005
The turmoil over whether the top echelon of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting has been tainted by political partisanship took a fresh turn yesterday. CPB's inspector general, who among other duties oversees questions of ethics within the organization, plans to investigate whether chairman Kenneth Y. Tomlinson acted appropriately in selecting a new CPB president. Both Tomlinson and the new president, Patricia Harrison, are prominent Republicans. The inspector general, Kenneth A. Konz, had already embarked on a probe of Tomlinson's decision to spend more than $14,000 of taxpayers' money to hire Republican lobbyists and consultants to advise him on working with Congress and to study the political bent of public broadcasting, particularly Now With Bill Moyers on PBS. Last month's appointment of Harrison, a former co-chair of the Republican National Committee, raised eyebrows among Democratic members of Congress and supporters of public broadcasting, who feared that it was part of a GOP effort to shift the Public Broadcasting Service, National Public Radio and other public broadcasters to the right.
NEWS
July 5, 2005
Funds for CPB help citizens stay informed There is a lot of government spending I'd like to see ended, but not money for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting ("End taxpayer funding of public broadcasting," Opinion * Commentary, June 27). David Boaz's argument that we don't need to subsidize one more channel in a "500-channel world" is specious because the majority of those channels are owned by a very few very large corporations - all driven by the bottom line. The result has been a diminished quality of broadcasting and scope of information available - much of it trivial, shallow, divisive, commercial-saturated and repetitive.
NEWS
By David Boaz | June 27, 2005
WASHINGTON - Congressional Republicans cut funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which funds public radio and television stations. After having their fun, they then agreed to restore most of the money and dropped their threat to eventually phase out all taxpayer funding. But they shouldn't back down. In fact, they should finish the job: End all taxpayer funding for government broadcasting stations and let them compete in the marketplace like other broadcasters. In a 500-channel world, why do the taxpayers need to subsidize one more channel?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 22, 2005
WASHINGTON - From partisan rallies on Capitol Hill featuring PBS kids' TV characters like Clifford the Big Red Dog to an army of station managers from around the country trooping through the halls of Congress to lobby their representatives, the culture war over public broadcasting broke out all over D.C. yesterday. The catalyst for yesterday's actions was a move late last week by the House Appropriations Committee to cut $100 million out of the proposed $400 million PBS budget for the fiscal year 2006 that starts in October.
NEWS
By Anthony S. Brandon | June 6, 2005
THE CONTROVERSY over recent actions by the chair of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting might not be so disturbing if the organization were not engaging in the exact kind of political interference it was designed to prevent. Kenneth Y. Tomlinson, who has quietly headed CPB for 18 months, recently emerged with an agenda that includes hiring monitors to find examples of liberal bias on public affairs shows, appointing ombudsmen to carry out further monitoring and making thinly veiled threats to pull funding for shows that don't meet his fairness criteria.
FEATURES
By Martin Tolchin and Martin Tolchin,New York Times | March 6, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A bill to provide financing for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting has collided with conservative Senate Republicans, who say public television stations display a consistent liberal bias in their choice of programs.The conservatives have threatened to prepare a flurry of amendments that they say would achieve "balance in programming."Wednesday, faced with the introduction of those amendments, the Senate Democratic leadership pulled the bill from the Senate floor. Debate on the measure could resume as early as next week.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | April 1, 1995
There's a culture war, as Pat Buchanan wisely predicted, but people have difficulty determining which side they are on.A traditionalist view is that culture helps to define nationality. Therefore, it is the business of the state to promote and shape, if not dictate or define it.Many nations came to be through cultural revival. Late-blooming European nationalisms began largely as language movements. The Irish Republic and France stand out as democracies that make promotion of the national culture the central business of the state.
TOPIC
By Paul Moore | June 5, 2005
THE ORGANIZATION of News Ombudsmen encompasses nearly 100 men and women worldwide who represent the readers, viewers and listeners of their newspapers and television and radio networks. Now in its 25th year, the organization's annual conference has often served as a support group for members, who deal daily with complaints from an increasingly polarized and frustrated public. One might say the pronunciation of the group's acronym - "Oh, no!" - is particularly appropriate. This year's meeting, held last month in London, was notable for making news when ONO rejected the efforts of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's two new ombudsmen to join.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2005
"It's dM-ijM-` vu all over again," says public broadcast pioneer James Day. In quoting baseball and malaprop Hall of Famer Yogi Berra, Day was referring to recent reports about the head of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting investigating public broadcasting for political "balance." "It happened in the Nixon years particularly," says Day, who helped found San Francisco's public television station, KQED, in 1953. "When Nixon finally appointed the majority on the Corporation for Public Broadcasting board, it in effect began to take over programming, even though it was not supposed to do that," he says.
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