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Corporate Welfare

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BUSINESS
January 13, 2012
Rugged individualist Mitt Romney is all for the free market, unless it involves pocketing millions in government corporate welfare. Check out the impressive list from Phil Mattera of Good Jobs First of all the companies backed by Bain Capital, Romney's company, that fed at the government udder. In case after case after case, Bain was enjoying public emoluments even as it bought and sold and downsized its way through these employers.  Says Mattera: "Yet a look at Romney's record at Bain shows not only Gordon Gekko-like business buccaneering, but also a willingness to embrace those very government checks and assurances he is now repudiating.
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NEWS
March 7, 2014
Does this house look familiar? Participating in "The Miracle on 34th Street" is a privilege a few friends and I have had for the past two years. Boh and Utz are pretty cute, right? There was a new addition to the display for 2013 - painted panels supporting "House of Cards," "Veep" and overall film production in Maryland. We aren't just fans of the shows, we are employees representing multiple on-set departments. The majority of our income is generated by these productions, and it pains us to consider moving elsewhere to maintain steady employment.
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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2010
From Jay Hancock's Blog: Good Jobs First, which has been tracking and inveighing against dumb corporate welfare since the 1990s, has a new report on how well states disclose the details of economic development subsidies. If states are going to create a double-standard taxation system -- one for the suckers who pay sticker price, another for the companies that can wheedle tax discounts and subsidies out of the pols -- the least states can do is disclose what they're doing. Most of them don't.
NEWS
By Lawrence S. Wittner | March 13, 2013
At this time of severe cutbacks in government funding for food stamps, early childhood education and Meals on Wheels, some Maryland legislators are hard at work looking out for the welfare of one of the world's wealthiest corporations. Under a bill advancing in the General Assembly, the Lockheed Martin Corp. would have the taxes on its luxurious Bethesda hotel and conference center reduced by approximately $450,000 a year. An earlier version of the legislation also included a $1.4 million refund for the period since 2010.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | May 23, 2011
Last week's party for GM's electric motor plant in White Marsh had all the ingredients for the start of construction of a major U.S. factory: a ceremonial groundbreaking, anodyne political speeches — and millions of dollars in free money from taxpayers. General Motors is paying for barely half of the $244 million plant. The automaker is relying on $105 million from the Energy Department and more than $10 million from the state of Maryland and Baltimore County. It's the kind of payoff that has become fashionable again now that the economy is growing and corporations are committing some of their hoarded billions to capital projects and relocations.
NEWS
By Lawrence S. Wittner | March 13, 2013
At this time of severe cutbacks in government funding for food stamps, early childhood education and Meals on Wheels, some Maryland legislators are hard at work looking out for the welfare of one of the world's wealthiest corporations. Under a bill advancing in the General Assembly, the Lockheed Martin Corp. would have the taxes on its luxurious Bethesda hotel and conference center reduced by approximately $450,000 a year. An earlier version of the legislation also included a $1.4 million refund for the period since 2010.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | September 6, 2012
The shouting's over. Harford County has either won or lost, and the credit can now be taken even as the blame is being assessed. There is, after all, plenty of both to go around. The issue at hand is the securing by Harford County of the U.S. headquarters of the British firm Smith's Detection, which makes X-ray and scanning equipment, mostly for government agencies. The company promises to bring 225 new jobs to the area, and there are folks who want to claim credit for that. As part of the effort to lure the firm to Harford County, it was granted a $100,000 county training grant, over the objections of members of Harford County's vocal and conservative Campaign for Liberty organization.
NEWS
By Stephen Moore | April 10, 1995
Washington -- A NEW POLITICAL catch phrase has entered the Washington lexicon: corporate welfare.On the left, Labor Secretary Robert Reich and Rep. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, a socialist, have called for an end to "aid to dependent corporations."On the right, Sen. Phil Gramm, R-Texas, and John Kasich of Ohio, the chairman of the House Budget Committee, have pledged to eliminate billions of dollars in federal loans and subsidies to selected industries.Congress may finally be getting serious about getting business off government support.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | July 16, 2004
CHICAGO - Eight years ago, Congress and Bill Clinton agreed to do something the president had promised to do - "end welfare as we know it." But that was for poor people who had grown too dependent on the dole. When it comes to corporations accustomed to public aid, though, we've carefully preserved welfare as we know it. Corporate welfare - an array of direct subsidies, tax breaks and indirect assistance created for the special benefit of businesses - is one of those things that politicians would rather criticize than abolish.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- If the Republican Congress is truly serious about ending dependence on government handouts, it should look beyond the poor and also slash subsidies to corporate America, an unusual alliance of moderate, conservative and liberal policy experts declared yesterday.The government could save $265 billion over five years by eliminating or scaling back 120 spending programs and tax breaks that benefit particular industries, according to a report released by the Progressive Policy Institute (PPI)
NEWS
By David Horsey | November 13, 2012
President Obama's re-election has caused right-wingers to become completely unhinged. They are purple-faced and apoplectic, convinced that an ignorant horde of government-dependent social leeches have destroyed traditional America and banished God from the country. The craziest comments came from certifiably loony celebrities. Gun-crazy rocker Ted Nugent tweeted that "Pimps whores and welfare brats and their soulless supporters hav (sic) a president to destroy America," while former "Saturday Night Live" goofball Victoria Jackson let loose a series of tweets, saying in part, "Thanks a lot, Christians, for not showing up. You disgust me ... In the Good vs. Evil battle, today Evil won. " Egomaniacal rich guy Donald Trump simply called for a revolution.
NEWS
October 9, 2012
Baltimore Gas and Electric made a decision to cut its work force to make more profit. Customers should never have to pay a surcharge for outages ("A worthy investment," Oct. 4). The losses should be absorbed by the shareholders. They are the ones that profit when times are good. Why would you advocate socializing the risks and privatizing the profits? This is just more corporate welfare. Les Kurts
NEWS
September 23, 2012
When Mitt Romney says that 47 percent of the people in this country accept and expect government handouts, he should be including himself and many of his party in that 47 percent. He's ignoring all the corporate welfare he and his wealthy cronies have received. He's also forgetting about all the tax loopholes that are in place - some in very gray areas - to ensure he has a much lower tax rate than salaried people do. Tax returns, Mitt? Then there is Michele Bachmann's family who happily accept hundreds of thousands of dollars in farm subsidies.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | September 6, 2012
The shouting's over. Harford County has either won or lost, and the credit can now be taken even as the blame is being assessed. There is, after all, plenty of both to go around. The issue at hand is the securing by Harford County of the U.S. headquarters of the British firm Smith's Detection, which makes X-ray and scanning equipment, mostly for government agencies. The company promises to bring 225 new jobs to the area, and there are folks who want to claim credit for that. As part of the effort to lure the firm to Harford County, it was granted a $100,000 county training grant, over the objections of members of Harford County's vocal and conservative Campaign for Liberty organization.
NEWS
July 24, 2012
I disagree with Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s characterization that President Obama is anti-entrepreneurship or self-reliance ("Mr. President, nobody else 'made that happen,'" July 22). The GOP whines that they hate government, but they're more than happy to accept Social Security, Medicare, police and emergency services, tax subsidies, corporate welfare and earmarks. As a parent, making sacrifices for my children is part of the job description. However, it's also my responsibility to instill a sense of gratitude, not entitlement.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2012
Rugged individualist Mitt Romney is all for the free market, unless it involves pocketing millions in government corporate welfare. Check out the impressive list from Phil Mattera of Good Jobs First of all the companies backed by Bain Capital, Romney's company, that fed at the government udder. In case after case after case, Bain was enjoying public emoluments even as it bought and sold and downsized its way through these employers.  Says Mattera: "Yet a look at Romney's record at Bain shows not only Gordon Gekko-like business buccaneering, but also a willingness to embrace those very government checks and assurances he is now repudiating.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | June 29, 2003
BOEING CO. is being quite finicky about where it builds its next airplane plant. Not just any place will do, and the company has a long list of necessaries, including a port, good flying weather, a skilled labor force and a lot of land. Oh yeah, and a big, fat welfare check from local taxpayers. Boeing denies that last part, of course. The corporate "site selection" charade includes the pretense that companies are not shaking down states and counties for "incentives" such as tax discounts, cheap loans, cash gifts, property grants and so forth.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,SUN COLUMNIST | August 9, 2006
There have been bigger corporate welfare deals than the one that lured AAA Mid-Atlantic to Delaware. There have been worse deals, and deals negotiated with less disclosure. But rarely are "economic-development incentives" chronicled with the attention that New Jersey Policy Perspective has devoted to the $7 million-plus that lured more than 600 AAA jobs to Delaware from Pennsylvania and Maryland. The liberal policy group's new analysis is a revealing study of how companies play the interstate job-jealousy game, sap tax revenue and contribute nothing extra to the national economy.
NEWS
August 11, 2011
Where was the business community when the debt ceiling debate was going on? Why weren't they piling into Washington with grim faces and falling charts showing Congress what was likely to happen if America continued make a spectacle of itself, looking to all the world like Ozzy Osbourne and his family had taken over the Capitol? Why are corporate lobbyists' fingers only on the speed dial buttons when fighting for corporate welfare but not for the welfare of the nation? Don't they realize that their corporate welfare is dependent on the welfare of the nation, and the welfare of the nation is dependent on the middle class?
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | May 23, 2011
Last week's party for GM's electric motor plant in White Marsh had all the ingredients for the start of construction of a major U.S. factory: a ceremonial groundbreaking, anodyne political speeches — and millions of dollars in free money from taxpayers. General Motors is paying for barely half of the $244 million plant. The automaker is relying on $105 million from the Energy Department and more than $10 million from the state of Maryland and Baltimore County. It's the kind of payoff that has become fashionable again now that the economy is growing and corporations are committing some of their hoarded billions to capital projects and relocations.
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