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By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
Halfway through the Black Eyed Peas' live show, rapper Taboo hops on a neon-glowing motorcycle and, using suspension wires, rides it out above the crowd — all while singing "Rockin' to the Beat. " "You never expect a flying motorcycle to hover over your head during the show," he said. "It takes the show to a different level. " Inspired by the '80s movie "Tron," the motorcycle is one of the more eyebrow-raising moments in a concert that's loaded with dizzying lights, props and special effects.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
An Inner Harbor ice rink is set to open by Nov. 21, and an ongoing fundraising effort will determine how large it will be, according to the Waterfront Partnership. The organization has hired Virginia-based Rink Management Services Corp. to construct and operate a rink at McKeldin Square, said Laurie Schwartz, president of the partnership. It's scheduled to be open through Martin Luther King Jr. weekend in late January. It will bring ice skating back to the Inner Harbor for the first time in about a decade, though at a different location than its longtime home at Rash Field.
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FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1994
New York -- The highlight?It could have come opening night when Olympic diver Greg Louganis came out and New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani showed up.Or maybe it was at a skating rink in Coney Island when Stephane Vachon won the ice dance competition with a partner he met only 15 minutes before, a coach named Charles Sinek. Only later, after the medal ceremony, did Mr. Vachon realize that Mr. Sinek was heterosexual and he gasped, "Are you straight?"Or maybe, just maybe, the highlight occurred on a hot, steamy day on Randalls Island, when Diane Batchelor, 35 pounds overweight, eight months pregnant, and in the midst of contractions, actually completed a 100-meter dash final, while in the stands, her companion cheered.
NEWS
By Steve Jones | December 11, 2012
Thirteen-year-old Octavio Vazquez had $100 to spend this past weekend at the Cockeysville Wal-Mart, but he really wasn't looking for something for himself. As he roamed the aisles with Baltimore County Officer Michael Schmitz Jr., of the Wilkens Precinct, he was intent on using most of the $100 gift card donated by area Optimists Clubs to purchase presents for his brother, uncle and grandparents. "I'm trying to get gifts for those that give gifts to me," Octavio said. "I think they'll feel good about the things I got for them.
SPORTS
By MELINDA CURTIS AND KERRY G. JOHNSON and MELINDA CURTIS AND KERRY G. JOHNSON,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2004
Michael Phelps of Rodgers Forge will be competing on the swimming team at the Olympics in Athens. He may compete for eight gold medals (five individual events and three team relays). If Phelps matches swimmer Mark Spitz's feat of winning seven gold medals at the 1972 Games, he would earn a $1 million bonus from one of his corporate sponsors, Speedo.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2004
Baltimore hopes to reap a cleaner harbor and more money for its municipal coffers as it joins the Adopt-A-Waterway program, a fund-raising and cleanup initiative loosely modeled on more common adopt-a-highway efforts. Unlike the hands-on highway programs that outfit volunteer trash-pickers with orange vests and garbage bags, Adopt-A-Waterway mostly involves recruiting corporate sponsors, whose donations will be used for city cleanup efforts and a privately run environmental education campaign.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2005
Singing the blues costs money. "Yes it does," says Baltimore Blues Festival organizer Craig Curley. "And putting on a blues festival causes the blues." There will be no 11th annual Baltimore Blues Festival at Patterson Park next month, Curley announced yesterday. Event planners had raised a mere $125 to cover the $40,000 cost of this year's festival, which was scheduled for Sept. 9-11. Although disappointed, Curley said he had no choice but to cancel the event. Over the years, the Baltimore Blues Festival has been held at the Baltimore Yacht Basin, Patterson Park and the Maryland State Fairgrounds.
NEWS
December 19, 2011
Albert Einstein is famously reported to have said that the definition of insanity was to continue doing the same thing over and over again and expect different results. By that definition, it appears that America has gone stark raving mad. Our economy is in tatters. We have mortgaged our children's future to the Chinese. We are mired in a state of perpetual war abroad and embarked on a ruinous course of nation building in distant, impoverished nations while our own infrastructure crumbles and decays around us. Our Congress is locked in perpetual gridlock, and our politicians are bought and paid for by lobbyists and corporate sponsors.
BUSINESS
By Boston Globe | July 29, 1992
A few months ago Earvin "Magic" Johnson was worried about being dumped as a spokesman by corporate sponsors. Now the shoe is on the other foot.Yesterday on the court in Monte Carlo, Mr. Johnson showed off a new move to reporters: the slam dump. He slammed his shoe company, Converse Inc. of North Reading, Mass., in unusually harsh terms for its behind-the-times advertising, then announced he was dumping the company after 13 years."Converse as a company is stuck in the '60s and '70s. They think the Chuck Taylor [sneaker]
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2001
Maryland's Commission on Indian Affairs is turning up the heat on schools and athletic leagues that use Indian mascot names - even calling for an economic boycott of a baseball Little League that uses major-league nicknames. The commission - a quasi-independent board of the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development, appointed by the governor - wants to boycott the 64 corporate sponsors of the Germantown Athletic Club baseball leagues. That includes companies as large as Giant Food and as small as the Germantown Copy Center and Montgomery Investigative Services.
NEWS
December 19, 2011
Albert Einstein is famously reported to have said that the definition of insanity was to continue doing the same thing over and over again and expect different results. By that definition, it appears that America has gone stark raving mad. Our economy is in tatters. We have mortgaged our children's future to the Chinese. We are mired in a state of perpetual war abroad and embarked on a ruinous course of nation building in distant, impoverished nations while our own infrastructure crumbles and decays around us. Our Congress is locked in perpetual gridlock, and our politicians are bought and paid for by lobbyists and corporate sponsors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
Halfway through the Black Eyed Peas' live show, rapper Taboo hops on a neon-glowing motorcycle and, using suspension wires, rides it out above the crowd — all while singing "Rockin' to the Beat. " "You never expect a flying motorcycle to hover over your head during the show," he said. "It takes the show to a different level. " Inspired by the '80s movie "Tron," the motorcycle is one of the more eyebrow-raising moments in a concert that's loaded with dizzying lights, props and special effects.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
Bob Sicard is in charge of lining up partnerships for Artscape. He's the guy who has to find sponsors willing to put up enough cash to ensure that the country's largest free outdoor arts festival remains the country's largest free outdoor arts festival. In a time of recession, in a city staring down a $121 million budget deficit, you'd think Sicard would be in a tough position. Trying to raise money at a time like this can't be easy, right? But Sicard says that he's coming off his best year ever.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
For years, the Preakness has been run in Baltimore as if it might be the last time. Now, a rebounding economy, a new marketing strategy and its owner exiting bankruptcy appear to have solidified the race's future here. Corporate sponsorships for today's Preakness Stakes are up, according to organizers, and include newcomers such as the horse racing broadcaster HRTV and Iberia Airlines. Ticket sales are brisk as fans who pinched pennies last year are heading back to the races and as the "Get Your Preak On" marketing campaign — controversial to some — seems to have lured back the younger crowd who stayed away last year because of new rules against bringing in alcoholic beverages.
NEWS
January 25, 2010
The recent Supreme Court decision extending individual freedom of speech rights to corporations is yet but another step away from what our founders conceived as a government "of, by and for the people" ("And now, the deluge," Jan. 25). It further enables the vast wealth and power of corporate entities to influence public policy well beyond the abilities of any individual or collective group of citizens. We have long witnessed the overwhelming success of health care, insurance, energy and other corporate lobbyists' in the service of their own financial needs rather than in the service of the public good.
NEWS
By JOE PALAZZOLO and JOE PALAZZOLO,SUN REPORTER | February 11, 2006
A new Jesuit-run high school will offer a college-prep curriculum for low-income Baltimore students and steer them to part-time jobs in professional offices to help them earn money to cover tuition costs. The Maryland Province Jesuits say Cristo Rey High School will offer a glimmer of hope in a city where census figures show that 26.2 percent of the children live in poverty and the median household income is $30,078. Yesterday, Maryland Province Jesuits, corporate sponsors and city officials met at Loyola College to unveil plans for the school, which would open in 2007 at 1634 Guilford Ave. in an old city elementary school that was shuttered in 2001 because of declining enrollment.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Evening Sun Staff | June 28, 1991
Corporate sponsors and some of the trappings are missing -- along with 1,000 kids from its glory years -- but BNBL survives.Year 22 in the Baltimore Neighborhood Basketball League is winding down, as playoffs begin tonight at four recreation sites and conclude next Wednesday, July 3, with boys championship games at Lake Clifton-Eastern High.BNBL does not have the scope it enjoyed through the early 1980s, when it had more than 2,400 players. Organizers were scrambling in April to organize the program and still don't always know where the money will come from, but 1,400 boys and girls on 146 teams got a colored jersey and the chance to play !
BUSINESS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2003
Thousands of beach-bound travelers could get a free ride across the Bay Bridge this summer from corporate sponsors willing to pick up the tab in return for advertising on tollbooth signs, high-volume state Web sites and toll-plaza banners at the bridge. The idea, Maryland Transportation Authority officials say, is to ease congestion at the eastbound ticket gates where 4- to 12-mile rolling backups are common on prime summer weekends. If successful, the off-peak toll sponsorships, which apparently haven't been tried on a large-scale anywhere in the country, could be extended beyond the trial now set for three weekends in June.
NEWS
January 7, 2006
NEW ORLEANS --With the city in dire financial shape because of Hurricane Katrina, companies are lining up for the opportunity to become the first-ever corporate sponsors of New Orleans' Mardi Gras celebration. At least 20 companies are offering to pay $2 million each to help cover the police and cleanup costs for next month's parades and parties, according to MediaBuys LLC, the firm hired to search for underwriters. Such sponsorships are a radical change for what is billed as the nation's biggest free party.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2005
Singing the blues costs money. "Yes it does," says Baltimore Blues Festival organizer Craig Curley. "And putting on a blues festival causes the blues." There will be no 11th annual Baltimore Blues Festival at Patterson Park next month, Curley announced yesterday. Event planners had raised a mere $125 to cover the $40,000 cost of this year's festival, which was scheduled for Sept. 9-11. Although disappointed, Curley said he had no choice but to cancel the event. Over the years, the Baltimore Blues Festival has been held at the Baltimore Yacht Basin, Patterson Park and the Maryland State Fairgrounds.
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