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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
Security officials at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine campus in East Baltimore are stepping up patrols and plan to add another officer kiosk in response to several robberies and assaults of Hopkins employees since the middle of last month, according to Corporate Security, the company that patrols the campus. Officials said foot and bike patrols have been increased along North Wolfe and North Washington streets between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. after the first episode on July 14, and alerts were sent to employees.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
It's rare for Baltimore Police to notify the public of crime when the reported incident doesn't involve someone being shot, but community groups often get more detailed information, and Johns Hopkins students and staff are certainly no exception. Two such recent alerts focused on crime involving groups of youth, with corporate security in one of the alerts warning of "recent reports of groups of juveniles converging on vehicles and vandalizing vehicles while stopped at traffic lights.
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BUSINESS
August 18, 1997
New positionsAmericom selects Sidell as chief financial officerAmericom Inc. has chosen Bruce R. Sidell as chief financial officer for the Lutherville-based wireless communications support company.The Wake Forest University graduate is a certified public accountant and former director of finance and administration at Biosys. He resides in Baltimore.EA Engineering taps Mulvey for vice presidentEA Engineering, Science and Technology Inc. announced that Neil P. Mulvey has joined the firm as vice president and branch manager, responsible for EA's operations in New Jersey and Delaware.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
Security officials at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine campus in East Baltimore are stepping up patrols and plan to add another officer kiosk in response to several robberies and assaults of Hopkins employees since the middle of last month, according to Corporate Security, the company that patrols the campus. Officials said foot and bike patrols have been increased along North Wolfe and North Washington streets between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. after the first episode on July 14, and alerts were sent to employees.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
In a growing number of boardrooms nationwide, corporations are making room at the table for a once-obscure executive: the corporate security officer. At many high-profile companies, the title predates the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in Washington and New York. But it's one that is receiving more attention and clout as businesses increase their spending on safety and security in an effort to satisfy new government regulations, reassure employees and reduce potential liability. "I think Sept.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
It's rare for Baltimore Police to notify the public of crime when the reported incident doesn't involve someone being shot, but community groups often get more detailed information, and Johns Hopkins students and staff are certainly no exception. Two such recent alerts focused on crime involving groups of youth, with corporate security in one of the alerts warning of "recent reports of groups of juveniles converging on vehicles and vandalizing vehicles while stopped at traffic lights.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, Julie Scharper and Frank Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
Paul Warren Pardus did not have to evade security Thursday when he took a handgun to the eighth floor of the Nelson Building at Johns Hopkins Hospital. There was nothing to stop him from carrying a gun into the hospital, no metal detector to set off an alarm. While Hopkins has long focused on safety at its sprawling medical campus in crime-plagued East Baltimore, the hospital does not require patients or visitors to pass through metal detectors, as Americans must do now at airports, courthouses and many federal buildings.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Jennifer McMenamin and Julie Scharper and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporters | October 3, 2007
More than six years after their loved ones died in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attack on the Pentagon, four Maryland families have reached a settlement with an airline and several corporations that they accused of "dangerous long-standing flaws" in security procedures, a lawyer representing the families said yesterday. The families - along with two women who were injured at the Pentagon, and relatives of a woman killed at the World Trade Center - settled in a case that lawyers say was intended to shed light on airport security lapses.
NEWS
October 29, 2004
On October 24, 2004, RONALD J. La MARTINA beloved husband of Sandra L. La Martina (nee Easter), devoted father of Brian C. La Martina, father-in-law of Carrie La Martina L.D., devoted son of the late John and Ethel La Martina, loving brother to Anthony, Joseph, Thomas, John, Denis and the late Donald La Martina, son-in-law of Yolanda Ash (Ronald is retired from Baltimore City Police Department. He is an investigator with Johns Hopkins Hospital Corporate Security and a member of KOC). Relatives and friends are invited to call at Schimunek funeral Home Inc., 9705 Belair Road, (Perry Hall)
BUSINESS
October 22, 2001
New positions PHH names Ennis, Weikel senior vice presidents Rita L. Ennis was named senior vice president of human resources and Joseph W. Weikel is senior vice president and general counsel for PHH Arval, a Hunt Valleybased automobile fleet management company. Ennis is responsible for all North American strategic human resources activities. She has been with PHH since 1986. Weikel is responsible for all legal matters for PHH in North America, including legislative and industry relations, and has been with the company since 1994.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, Julie Scharper and Frank Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
Paul Warren Pardus did not have to evade security Thursday when he took a handgun to the eighth floor of the Nelson Building at Johns Hopkins Hospital. There was nothing to stop him from carrying a gun into the hospital, no metal detector to set off an alarm. While Hopkins has long focused on safety at its sprawling medical campus in crime-plagued East Baltimore, the hospital does not require patients or visitors to pass through metal detectors, as Americans must do now at airports, courthouses and many federal buildings.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Jennifer McMenamin and Julie Scharper and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporters | October 3, 2007
More than six years after their loved ones died in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attack on the Pentagon, four Maryland families have reached a settlement with an airline and several corporations that they accused of "dangerous long-standing flaws" in security procedures, a lawyer representing the families said yesterday. The families - along with two women who were injured at the Pentagon, and relatives of a woman killed at the World Trade Center - settled in a case that lawyers say was intended to shed light on airport security lapses.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
In a growing number of boardrooms nationwide, corporations are making room at the table for a once-obscure executive: the corporate security officer. At many high-profile companies, the title predates the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in Washington and New York. But it's one that is receiving more attention and clout as businesses increase their spending on safety and security in an effort to satisfy new government regulations, reassure employees and reduce potential liability. "I think Sept.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1997
New positionsAmericom selects Sidell as chief financial officerAmericom Inc. has chosen Bruce R. Sidell as chief financial officer for the Lutherville-based wireless communications support company.The Wake Forest University graduate is a certified public accountant and former director of finance and administration at Biosys. He resides in Baltimore.EA Engineering taps Mulvey for vice presidentEA Engineering, Science and Technology Inc. announced that Neil P. Mulvey has joined the firm as vice president and branch manager, responsible for EA's operations in New Jersey and Delaware.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 23, 1998
Saying that efforts of the Baltimore Police Department have led to a significant drop in bank robberies this year, NationsBank donated $5,000 yesterday to the agency to be used for rewards.The money was donated to the department's Metro Crime Stoppers program, which rewards citizens for information, in recognition of the work of Lt. Larry Leeson, head of the robbery unit."Baltimore City has done a tremendous job," said Michael J. Bacon, vice president of corporate security at NationsBank.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2000
The city's Community Relations Commission launched a judicial proceeding yesterday to determine if a former black police major was discriminated against when he resigned in 1997. Maj. Goldie S. Phillips Jr., a 24-year-veteran, resigned June 1, 1997, amid allegations that he leaked answers on two departmental promotional exams. In four hours of testimony yesterday at CRC headquarters downtown, some witnesses portrayed the department as out to get Phillips while others defended police commanders' actions.
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