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Corporate Philanthropy

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BUSINESS
March 25, 1991
MBW is getting a new look. Beginning next Monday, April 1, you'll see a redesigned MBW, including:* A weekly package of stories and columns about personal computing.* A new column on managing non-profits and the business of corporate philanthropy.* A revised business-strategy feature with more tips on how you can improve your business IQ.* A redesigned cover and table of contents.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Dozens of low-income middle schoolers at Baltimore's St. Ignatius Loyola Academy are getting a head start on money management, thanks to Legg Mason employees. Volunteers from the Baltimore-based money management firm regularly visit the Jesuit boys' school throughout the year to teach students how to open savings accounts, balance checkbooks and understand the taxes they'll soon have to pay. "We just don't want this to be just a financial component," said Auburn Bell, Legg Mason's director of corporate philanthropy.
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BUSINESS
By LESTER S. PICKER | March 9, 1992
When Alexis de Tocqueville visited America some two hundred years ago, he marveled at the volunteer spirit of its citizens and their passion for charitable works for the betterment of their communities. That spirit has grown to the point that today philanthropy is culturally ingrained into the American experience.But American-type charity has spread far beyond our borders. With globalization, the pace of change throughout the world has increased, bringing with it intense social problems. Many of these problems can be addressed more efficiently, and with greater permanence, through the application of charitable efforts.
NEWS
By Blythe Bernhard and Blythe Bernhard,McClatchey-Tribune | October 20, 2006
Every October, products from tweezers to toothpaste get packaged in pink. They're all sold with the promise of promoting breast cancer awareness or benefiting breast cancer charities. Breast cancer has become the darling disease of corporate philanthropy - especially during national breast cancer awareness month. But are the pink promotions more about boosting corporate profits via female-friendly marketing? Although heart disease and lung cancer kill more women each year, experts say breast cancer is considered safer for companies to latch onto.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove | February 17, 1991
ONCE UPON A TIME, THERE was a kind Fortune 500 corporation that donated millions of dollars to do good works in its hometown. It helped unwed mothers and underprivileged children. It built housing for the poor. It funded theater proj-ects and dance troupes. It was the community's No. 1 sugar daddy.One year, though, the kind corporation ran into trouble. Sales and profits went down. And then a big, bad, faraway company threatened to take over the corporation, break it up and sell off the pieces.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | June 6, 1994
At a recent panel discussion on corporate philanthropy, I was asked about some trends that are having a major impact on nonprofit organizations.One of the most significant changes in corporate philanthropy is the insistence on more accountability. Hardly revolutionary, this change has been evolving for the past decade. With corporate charitable dollars in short supply -- after all, it is only about 6 percent of all charitable giving in this country -- it makes sense that companies want to be sure that their funds are well spent.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | August 31, 1992
I had two very interesting, albeit diametrically opposed, discussions last week. In one case, a development director for a local non-profit complained of the confusion she said emanated from corporate charitable-giving circles nowadays. In the other case, a corporate client confessed his confusion over a barrage of requests for funding from non-profits that were threatening to bury his desk. Hmmmm.What is going on may not be difficult to understand. Resolving the problem is a lot more difficult.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | September 23, 1991
The Japanese corporate interests that moved with speed and power onto the U.S. industrial scene in the '80s are finding themselves under a pressure they never felt back home: to give something back to the communities where they do business.Total Japanese giving to the arts, education and social causes in America has soared from $45 million in 1986 to $300 million in 1990 and conceivably as much as $500 million this year, estimates Craig Smith, editor-publisher of the Seattle-based Corporate Philanthropy Report and the author of the just-published book ''Japanese Corporate Connection.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | December 26, 1994
Well, it's almost over. Another year has bitten the dust, we're that much older and, hopefully, a bit wiser. One thing's for sure. This has been a great year for philanthropy in our region.This was the year that The Johns Hopkins University launched its $750 million campaign, a much awaited mega-event that has caused a whole lot of nervous discussion in local fund-raising circles throughout the year. While many breathed a sigh of relief that the campaign did not set a $1 billion goal, like some of its rivals, others are still concerned that some of their best patrons -- will be unavailable for large gifts for the next several years.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | April 8, 1991
In 1989, American businesses gave away some $6 billion to charities, certainly no small amount of money. Yet, that sum represents a mere 5 percent of all charitable giving, and only about 2 percent of pre-tax corporate profits on average. But, corporations are in business to earn a profit; if a corporation folds, everyone loses, most especially those in need of social services.The bottom line on corporate philanthropy is that corporations give in their own enlightened self-interest. They give to support educational reform because they are experiencing problems with the work force; they give to the arts because it enhances the quality of life in their community.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | December 26, 1994
Well, it's almost over. Another year has bitten the dust, we're that much older and, hopefully, a bit wiser. One thing's for sure. This has been a great year for philanthropy in our region.This was the year that The Johns Hopkins University launched its $750 million campaign, a much awaited mega-event that has caused a whole lot of nervous discussion in local fund-raising circles throughout the year. While many breathed a sigh of relief that the campaign did not set a $1 billion goal, like some of its rivals, others are still concerned that some of their best patrons -- will be unavailable for large gifts for the next several years.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | June 6, 1994
At a recent panel discussion on corporate philanthropy, I was asked about some trends that are having a major impact on nonprofit organizations.One of the most significant changes in corporate philanthropy is the insistence on more accountability. Hardly revolutionary, this change has been evolving for the past decade. With corporate charitable dollars in short supply -- after all, it is only about 6 percent of all charitable giving in this country -- it makes sense that companies want to be sure that their funds are well spent.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | December 20, 1993
Passion isn't normally a word we associate with corporate charitable giving programs.Yet, I had no sooner taped a commentary on corporate charity for the program "Marketplace" on National Public Radio when I received calls taking positions on either side of mine. Some callers favored a more vigorous corporate giving program; others were opposed.But it was more than two months later when a most interesting, and passionate, letter arrived at my door.It had been routed to me through The Sun (my editor, obviously taking his cue from the U.S. Postal Service, keeps them in a pile for maybe six months before forwarding)
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | November 9, 1992
This is the first of three columns about corporate philanthropy.Listening to John Schisler talk, one immediately senses the value of experience. Recently retired from Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. after 37 years, 23 of them heading up its corporate giving programs, Schisler agreed to give a straight-talking, half-day workshop on soliciting funds from corporations. Everyone with whom I spoke was impressed.The workshop was one of a series offered by the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers, a non-profit, 50-member organization of groups that make significant charitable contributions to non-profits in the region.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | August 31, 1992
I had two very interesting, albeit diametrically opposed, discussions last week. In one case, a development director for a local non-profit complained of the confusion she said emanated from corporate charitable-giving circles nowadays. In the other case, a corporate client confessed his confusion over a barrage of requests for funding from non-profits that were threatening to bury his desk. Hmmmm.What is going on may not be difficult to understand. Resolving the problem is a lot more difficult.
BUSINESS
By LESTER S. PICKER | March 9, 1992
When Alexis de Tocqueville visited America some two hundred years ago, he marveled at the volunteer spirit of its citizens and their passion for charitable works for the betterment of their communities. That spirit has grown to the point that today philanthropy is culturally ingrained into the American experience.But American-type charity has spread far beyond our borders. With globalization, the pace of change throughout the world has increased, bringing with it intense social problems. Many of these problems can be addressed more efficiently, and with greater permanence, through the application of charitable efforts.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | December 20, 1993
Passion isn't normally a word we associate with corporate charitable giving programs.Yet, I had no sooner taped a commentary on corporate charity for the program "Marketplace" on National Public Radio when I received calls taking positions on either side of mine. Some callers favored a more vigorous corporate giving program; others were opposed.But it was more than two months later when a most interesting, and passionate, letter arrived at my door.It had been routed to me through The Sun (my editor, obviously taking his cue from the U.S. Postal Service, keeps them in a pile for maybe six months before forwarding)
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | November 9, 1992
This is the first of three columns about corporate philanthropy.Listening to John Schisler talk, one immediately senses the value of experience. Recently retired from Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. after 37 years, 23 of them heading up its corporate giving programs, Schisler agreed to give a straight-talking, half-day workshop on soliciting funds from corporations. Everyone with whom I spoke was impressed.The workshop was one of a series offered by the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers, a non-profit, 50-member organization of groups that make significant charitable contributions to non-profits in the region.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | September 23, 1991
The Japanese corporate interests that moved with speed and power onto the U.S. industrial scene in the '80s are finding themselves under a pressure they never felt back home: to give something back to the communities where they do business.Total Japanese giving to the arts, education and social causes in America has soared from $45 million in 1986 to $300 million in 1990 and conceivably as much as $500 million this year, estimates Craig Smith, editor-publisher of the Seattle-based Corporate Philanthropy Report and the author of the just-published book ''Japanese Corporate Connection.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | April 8, 1991
In 1989, American businesses gave away some $6 billion to charities, certainly no small amount of money. Yet, that sum represents a mere 5 percent of all charitable giving, and only about 2 percent of pre-tax corporate profits on average. But, corporations are in business to earn a profit; if a corporation folds, everyone loses, most especially those in need of social services.The bottom line on corporate philanthropy is that corporations give in their own enlightened self-interest. They give to support educational reform because they are experiencing problems with the work force; they give to the arts because it enhances the quality of life in their community.
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