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November 9, 2011
Anthony Marcavage continues a vital conversation about the nation's social contract ("Both sides wrong about social contract," Nov. 3) and promotes an at-first-blush balanced view that both liberals and conservatives are wrong - certainly plausible in this day and age. However, Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren's argument is mischaracterized in order to conclude falsely that her contention about what we each owe one another and society is...
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | December 18, 2013
It's charity time, and not just because the holiday season reminds us to be charitable. As the tax year draws to a close, the charitable tax deduction beckons. America's wealthy are its largest beneficiaries. According to the Congressional Budget Office, $33 billion of last year's $39 billion in total charitable deductions went to the richest 20 percent of Americans, of whom the richest 1 percent reaped the lion's share. The generosity of the super-rich is sometimes proffered as evidence they're contributing as much to the nation's well-being as they did decades ago, when they paid a much larger share of their earnings in taxes.
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | December 18, 2013
It's charity time, and not just because the holiday season reminds us to be charitable. As the tax year draws to a close, the charitable tax deduction beckons. America's wealthy are its largest beneficiaries. According to the Congressional Budget Office, $33 billion of last year's $39 billion in total charitable deductions went to the richest 20 percent of Americans, of whom the richest 1 percent reaped the lion's share. The generosity of the super-rich is sometimes proffered as evidence they're contributing as much to the nation's well-being as they did decades ago, when they paid a much larger share of their earnings in taxes.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Howard County police detectives searched the office of the Columbia Housing Corporation on Wednesday in an investigation involving an employee, a lawyer representing the nonprofit agency said in a statement. Thomas Meachum, of Columbia, said in an email that the agency "provided the information and documentation requested by the Police Department, and will continue to provide any other information the Department feels it needs to conduct its investigation of the employee. The employee in question has been placed on administrative leave pending the investigation.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2011
Not me, of course, but lots of workers complain about their bosses. In fact, tens of thousands of employees each year go so far as to take their concerns to the Department of Labor — more grievances than the agency can handle. Now there's backup help. The Labor Department has established a first-of-its-kind program with the American Bar Association. The agency would put workers whose complaints it won't take up in touch with private employment lawyers. The Bridge to Justice program focuses on potential violations of overtime, minimum wage and family medical leave laws.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2005
C. Keating Bowie, a retired Baltimore corporate lawyer and former chairman of the board of trustees of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, died of cancer yesterday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 92. Mr. Bowie was born in Baltimore, the son of a lawyer, and was raised on Calvert Street and in Guilford. He was a 1932 graduate of Gilman School and earned a bachelor's degree in economics in 1936 from Princeton University. After graduating from Harvard Law School in 1939, Mr. Bowie returned to Baltimore and joined Bowie and Burke, his father's law firm, which later became Bowie, Burke and Leonard.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 7, 1994
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints announced yesterday the selection of Howard W. Hunter, an 86-year-old former corporate lawyer, as its 14th president, recognized as the supreme authority and "prophet, seer and revelator" by the world's 8.7 million Mormons.As successor to Ezra Taft Benson, who died at the age of 94 on May 30, Mr. Hunter heads a church that is rapidly growing but is also facing lingering disputes about feminism, intellectual freedom, a recent series of excommunications and about the system that has a top leadership advanced in age and in some cases failing in health.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 1, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court weighed yesterday a $79.5 million verdict to punish cigarette-maker Philip Morris in a closely watched test of whether the justices will put strict limits on big jury awards. This is the most important case of the term for major corporations, which seek to limit such awards, and the outcome probably depends on President Bush's two appointees to the high court. Bush promised to pick justices in the "mold" of conservative Justice Antonin Scalia. But on this front, business lawyers are hoping that's not true.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2001
A corporate defense attorney with an academic bent and few political connections, Thomas M. DiBiagio didn't expect to return when he left the U.S. attorney's office in Baltimore last year after a nine-year run prosecuting violent street gangs, deadly carjackings and brazen bank robberies. But in DiBiagio, colleagues say, a mild-mannered demeanor masks the gut instincts of a seasoned prosecutor. First approached this winter about serving as Maryland's U.S. attorney, he couldn't refuse the chance, in his words, to try to make the office a "first-rate, independent and aggressive law firm."
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 1, 2001
NEW YORK - When terrorist attacks damaged his downtown Manhattan office on Sept. 11, Eugene Schlanger responded like the rest of Wall Street: He went home, spent a few days with his family, then tried his best to get back to work at temporary quarters in Midtown. And somewhere along the way, he started a sonnet cycle. Schlanger is a deputy general counsel at Nomura Securities, one of the world's largest trading houses, and the chairman of the National Association of Securities' Dealers Committee of Greater New York.
NEWS
November 9, 2011
Anthony Marcavage continues a vital conversation about the nation's social contract ("Both sides wrong about social contract," Nov. 3) and promotes an at-first-blush balanced view that both liberals and conservatives are wrong - certainly plausible in this day and age. However, Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren's argument is mischaracterized in order to conclude falsely that her contention about what we each owe one another and society is...
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2011
Not me, of course, but lots of workers complain about their bosses. In fact, tens of thousands of employees each year go so far as to take their concerns to the Department of Labor — more grievances than the agency can handle. Now there's backup help. The Labor Department has established a first-of-its-kind program with the American Bar Association. The agency would put workers whose complaints it won't take up in touch with private employment lawyers. The Bridge to Justice program focuses on potential violations of overtime, minimum wage and family medical leave laws.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 1, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court weighed yesterday a $79.5 million verdict to punish cigarette-maker Philip Morris in a closely watched test of whether the justices will put strict limits on big jury awards. This is the most important case of the term for major corporations, which seek to limit such awards, and the outcome probably depends on President Bush's two appointees to the high court. Bush promised to pick justices in the "mold" of conservative Justice Antonin Scalia. But on this front, business lawyers are hoping that's not true.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2005
C. Keating Bowie, a retired Baltimore corporate lawyer and former chairman of the board of trustees of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, died of cancer yesterday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 92. Mr. Bowie was born in Baltimore, the son of a lawyer, and was raised on Calvert Street and in Guilford. He was a 1932 graduate of Gilman School and earned a bachelor's degree in economics in 1936 from Princeton University. After graduating from Harvard Law School in 1939, Mr. Bowie returned to Baltimore and joined Bowie and Burke, his father's law firm, which later became Bowie, Burke and Leonard.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 1, 2001
NEW YORK - When terrorist attacks damaged his downtown Manhattan office on Sept. 11, Eugene Schlanger responded like the rest of Wall Street: He went home, spent a few days with his family, then tried his best to get back to work at temporary quarters in Midtown. And somewhere along the way, he started a sonnet cycle. Schlanger is a deputy general counsel at Nomura Securities, one of the world's largest trading houses, and the chairman of the National Association of Securities' Dealers Committee of Greater New York.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2001
A corporate defense attorney with an academic bent and few political connections, Thomas M. DiBiagio didn't expect to return when he left the U.S. attorney's office in Baltimore last year after a nine-year run prosecuting violent street gangs, deadly carjackings and brazen bank robberies. But in DiBiagio, colleagues say, a mild-mannered demeanor masks the gut instincts of a seasoned prosecutor. First approached this winter about serving as Maryland's U.S. attorney, he couldn't refuse the chance, in his words, to try to make the office a "first-rate, independent and aggressive law firm."
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1999
George P. Stamas, one of Baltimore's most prominent corporate attorneys, will be named vice chairman of Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown today, and will head its global investment banking division in the mid-Atlantic region.Stamas will resign from the law firm of Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering before the end of the year to start his new job as an investment banker."The opportunity to join that team with the tradition in this region was intoxicating," said Stamas, 48. "I'm giddy."Stamas will report to Mayo A. Shattuck III and Yves de Balmann, who are co-chairmen of Deutsche Banc Alex.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Howard County police detectives searched the office of the Columbia Housing Corporation on Wednesday in an investigation involving an employee, a lawyer representing the nonprofit agency said in a statement. Thomas Meachum, of Columbia, said in an email that the agency "provided the information and documentation requested by the Police Department, and will continue to provide any other information the Department feels it needs to conduct its investigation of the employee. The employee in question has been placed on administrative leave pending the investigation.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1999
George P. Stamas, one of Baltimore's most prominent corporate attorneys, will be named vice chairman of Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown today, and will head its global investment banking division in the mid-Atlantic region.Stamas will resign from the law firm of Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering before the end of the year to start his new job as an investment banker."The opportunity to join that team with the tradition in this region was intoxicating," said Stamas, 48. "I'm giddy."Stamas will report to Mayo A. Shattuck III and Yves de Balmann, who are co-chairmen of Deutsche Banc Alex.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 7, 1994
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints announced yesterday the selection of Howard W. Hunter, an 86-year-old former corporate lawyer, as its 14th president, recognized as the supreme authority and "prophet, seer and revelator" by the world's 8.7 million Mormons.As successor to Ezra Taft Benson, who died at the age of 94 on May 30, Mr. Hunter heads a church that is rapidly growing but is also facing lingering disputes about feminism, intellectual freedom, a recent series of excommunications and about the system that has a top leadership advanced in age and in some cases failing in health.
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