Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCorporate Law
IN THE NEWS

Corporate Law

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
Aaron Margolis, an attorney active in Zionist organizations, died of complications of a pituitary adenoma Feb. 10 at the North Oaks Retirement Community. The former Northwest Baltimore resident was 87. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Minnie and Samson Margolis, a picture framer and calligraphy artist. He grew up on East Baltimore Street and attended Polytechnic Institute. For two years in the mid-1930s, the family lived in what was then Palestine, but returned to Baltimore when the elder Mr. Margolis could not find work or earn enough there in the Depression, family members said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Walter Evan Black Jr., a retired chief judge of the U.S. District Court for Maryland who ruled against the city of Baltimore in its efforts to acquire the Colts after the team moved to Indianapolis, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Monday at his Easton home. The former Roland Park-area resident was 88. During a lengthy career, he ruled against Baltimore in 1985 when it attempted to acquire the Colts football franchise by condemnation. In his ruling, he said the city did not have the power to take the franchise because the team had moved on the night of March 29, 1984, before the day the city had filed its suit.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2003
James J. Hanks Jr., a widely respected expert in corporate law, is joining the Baltimore office of Venable LLP on Monday along with a support staff of seven attorneys. Hanks, 60, a partner at Ballard Spahr Andrews & Ingersoll LLP more than 10 years, will become a partner at Venable and is expected to expand the corporate practice by 50 percent. "He's a terrific addition to our group, because he has such a high profile and has as a result all these national, corporate clients," said Robert H. Geis, partner-in-charge of the Baltimore office.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
Aaron Margolis, an attorney active in Zionist organizations, died of complications of a pituitary adenoma Feb. 10 at the North Oaks Retirement Community. The former Northwest Baltimore resident was 87. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Minnie and Samson Margolis, a picture framer and calligraphy artist. He grew up on East Baltimore Street and attended Polytechnic Institute. For two years in the mid-1930s, the family lived in what was then Palestine, but returned to Baltimore when the elder Mr. Margolis could not find work or earn enough there in the Depression, family members said.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2003
Legal and Insurance Johnson, Danielson join Shapiro Sher law firm Shapiro Sher Guinot & Sandler admitted Erin E. Johnson and Paul V. Danielson as associates in the Baltimore-based regional law firm. Johnson, formerly with the Washington firm of Gilbert Heintz & Randolph, is assigned to the litigation department and will counsel clients on insurance and securities-related matters. Danielson will advise on insolvency and Chapters 7 and 11 filings in the firm's bankruptcy department. He formerly was with the Columbus, Ohio, firm of Kegler, Brown, Hill & Ritter.
NEWS
January 5, 1997
PeopleKayla Tollen of Kayla Advertising in Columbia has been awarded the designation of certified advertising specialist by the Promotional Products Association International. The designation is given to recognize commitment to educational growth. To achieve the designation, industry professionals must complete a minimum of 70 hours of continuing education.Oren D. Saltzman, an independent practicing attorney, and Brian S. Jablon, formerly a partner with Smith, Somerville & Case L.L.C., have formed a new law firm -- Saltzman & Jablon L.L.C.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
Semmes Bowen & Semmes, Baltimore's fourth-largest law firm, has elected Cleaveland D. Miller, a specialist in banking and corporate law, as its chairman.Mr. Miller succeeds Geoffrey S. Mitchell, 53, who decided not to stand for re-election after a turbulent three-year term. Mr. Mitchell will return to the full-time practice of international law in the firm's Washington office.Since the 1950s, Semmes has routinely rotated partners through the chairman's post. The 107-year-old firm, which had 17 lawyers when Mr. Miller joined it in 1963, now has 140 attorneys working out of offices in Washington, Towson, Hagerstown and Wilmington, Del., in addition to Baltimore.
NEWS
By Ralph Nader | March 6, 1991
WHEN cancer took the life of Jean Camper Cahn recently, none of the TV evening news programs took note. Cahn wasn't a well-known actress, athlete or politician. She was only one of the most tireless fighters for social justice, one of the most effective democratic institution-builders and one of the most consequential educators of the past generation.She started as the strong-willed, exuberant daughter of a middle-class Baltimore family. Her father was a physician who founded Baltimore's NAACP chapter.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | January 21, 2004
ADD Deutsche Bank boss Josef Ackermann to the lineup of Ken Lay, Bernie Ebbers, Conrad Black, Martha Stewart and other business stars suspected of looting public shareholders. Ackermann's criminal trial opens today in Dusseldorf, Germany, and he is suffering Martha-style press treatment as well as the potent attentions of prosecutors. The chief executive of Germany's biggest bank (and the ultimate chief of Deutsche's Baltimore operations) has been summoned from his Frankfurt headquarters to a little courthouse in a provincial town and a trial that could put him in prison for a decade.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Walter Evan Black Jr., a retired chief judge of the U.S. District Court for Maryland who ruled against the city of Baltimore in its efforts to acquire the Colts after the team moved to Indianapolis, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Monday at his Easton home. The former Roland Park-area resident was 88. During a lengthy career, he ruled against Baltimore in 1985 when it attempted to acquire the Colts football franchise by condemnation. In his ruling, he said the city did not have the power to take the franchise because the team had moved on the night of March 29, 1984, before the day the city had filed its suit.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | July 25, 2007
Upset by a report that nearly half of Maryland's major corporations didn't pay income taxes last year, Gov. Martin O'Malley said he would seriously consider pushing for "combined reporting," a tax law change that advocates say would make it hard for companies to hide their profits in other states. O'Malley, a Democrat who is developing plans to close the projected $1.5 billion annual gap between state spending and revenue, said that if citizens are going to be asked to pay more taxes, businesses should pay their fair share, too. "This is an unfairness of the tax code that would allow some of the largest and most profitable corporations in the state to pay no income tax," O'Malley said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 24, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes said yesterday that the corporate accounting law he co-authored helped avert a crisis in U.S. securities markets, and that critics pushing to ease some of its regulations have forgotten the recent spate of corporate scandals. In remarks to a group of consumer advocates, Sarbanes said the bill fixed "systemic and structural defects" in overseeing company conduct. Critics have "short" memories of the accounting troubles that drove Enron Corp., WorldCom Inc. and other companies into bankruptcy.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | October 6, 2005
WASHINGTON -- As some conservatives attack President Bush's latest choice for the Supreme Court, members of another core Republican constituency - business - are quietly delighted with the nomination of Harriet E. Miers. Miers was a business lawyer at a blue-chip Texas law firm before following Bush to the White House. Her clients included Microsoft and Walt Disney, and her practice involved mostly corporate disputes. After her nomination this week, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce praised her. Thomas J. Donohue, president and CEO of the federation of 3 million businesses, said in a statement that her experience will be "essential in guiding the court on an array of business and other issues."
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | January 21, 2004
ADD Deutsche Bank boss Josef Ackermann to the lineup of Ken Lay, Bernie Ebbers, Conrad Black, Martha Stewart and other business stars suspected of looting public shareholders. Ackermann's criminal trial opens today in Dusseldorf, Germany, and he is suffering Martha-style press treatment as well as the potent attentions of prosecutors. The chief executive of Germany's biggest bank (and the ultimate chief of Deutsche's Baltimore operations) has been summoned from his Frankfurt headquarters to a little courthouse in a provincial town and a trial that could put him in prison for a decade.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2003
Legal and Insurance Johnson, Danielson join Shapiro Sher law firm Shapiro Sher Guinot & Sandler admitted Erin E. Johnson and Paul V. Danielson as associates in the Baltimore-based regional law firm. Johnson, formerly with the Washington firm of Gilbert Heintz & Randolph, is assigned to the litigation department and will counsel clients on insurance and securities-related matters. Danielson will advise on insolvency and Chapters 7 and 11 filings in the firm's bankruptcy department. He formerly was with the Columbus, Ohio, firm of Kegler, Brown, Hill & Ritter.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2003
James J. Hanks Jr., a widely respected expert in corporate law, is joining the Baltimore office of Venable LLP on Monday along with a support staff of seven attorneys. Hanks, 60, a partner at Ballard Spahr Andrews & Ingersoll LLP more than 10 years, will become a partner at Venable and is expected to expand the corporate practice by 50 percent. "He's a terrific addition to our group, because he has such a high profile and has as a result all these national, corporate clients," said Robert H. Geis, partner-in-charge of the Baltimore office.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 24, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes said yesterday that the corporate accounting law he co-authored helped avert a crisis in U.S. securities markets, and that critics pushing to ease some of its regulations have forgotten the recent spate of corporate scandals. In remarks to a group of consumer advocates, Sarbanes said the bill fixed "systemic and structural defects" in overseeing company conduct. Critics have "short" memories of the accounting troubles that drove Enron Corp., WorldCom Inc. and other companies into bankruptcy.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
After he completes his final term as mayor in December, Kurt L. Schmoke will become a partner in the high-powered corporate law office of Wilmer, Cutler and Pickering, a Washington-based firm with a satellite office in Baltimore.Schmoke, who decided three months ago not to seek re-election, is expected to announce the plans this morning at his weekly news conference.The new job appears to be a perfect fit for a law firm handling complex government regulatory affairs for corporations and the Rhodes Scholar mayor who proudly wears the label of "policy wonk."
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
After he completes his final term as mayor in December, Kurt L. Schmoke will become a partner in the high-powered corporate law office of Wilmer, Cutler and Pickering, a Washington-based firm with a satellite office in Baltimore.Schmoke, who decided three months ago not to seek re-election, is expected to announce the plans this morning at his weekly news conference.The new job appears to be a perfect fit for a law firm handling complex government regulatory affairs for corporations and the Rhodes Scholar mayor who proudly wears the label of "policy wonk."
NEWS
January 5, 1997
PeopleKayla Tollen of Kayla Advertising in Columbia has been awarded the designation of certified advertising specialist by the Promotional Products Association International. The designation is given to recognize commitment to educational growth. To achieve the designation, industry professionals must complete a minimum of 70 hours of continuing education.Oren D. Saltzman, an independent practicing attorney, and Brian S. Jablon, formerly a partner with Smith, Somerville & Case L.L.C., have formed a new law firm -- Saltzman & Jablon L.L.C.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.