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By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
A dozen years ago, Demetri Gambrill began working after school at FutureCare Health and Management as an activities assistant. The 28-year-old is now a geriatric nursing assistant, thanks to education that the company sponsored. "They sent me to school to become a nursing assistant. I didn't have to pay for anything - not books, not tests, not tuition," Gambrill said. All he had to do was write a letter showing interest in the program and commit to working for FutureCare for at least a year after completing the training, he said.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2014
Calvin G. Butler Jr. came to Baltimore nearly three years ago with one foot here and the other in Chicago, flying west on weekends to his wife and two teenagers. Now he's firmly in this region. His family moved to Cockeysville last summer. He's on two local nonprofit boards. And on Saturday, he took the helm at one of the city's largest employers, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. He's glad his stretch as a nomadic exec is over. And he's not the only one. "What I recognize is that I have a very patient wife," he said.
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BUSINESS
December 31, 1990
Nearly all American offices have copiers, and the vast majority have facsimile machines and personal computers, according to a survey released by Ricoh Corp., a leading office equipment company.The survey, "Issues in the Office," also found that midlevel managers are increasingly heavy users of these machines, sometimes using them more than their support staff.The survey of U.S. offices found that 94 percent have copiers, 87 percent have personal computers, 78 percent have fax machines and 57 percent have laser printers.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
A dozen years ago, Demetri Gambrill began working after school at FutureCare Health and Management as an activities assistant. The 28-year-old is now a geriatric nursing assistant, thanks to education that the company sponsored. "They sent me to school to become a nursing assistant. I didn't have to pay for anything - not books, not tests, not tuition," Gambrill said. All he had to do was write a letter showing interest in the program and commit to working for FutureCare for at least a year after completing the training, he said.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | August 12, 1991
As a business consultant, Pat Battle enters countless corporate offices around the world and sees the same thing nearly every time."It's guys in ties, white guys in ties," said Ms. Battle, who is based in Baltimore. "I don't know why, but every time, I'm still surprised."Which is precisely why she's not surprised by the results issued last week of the federal government's first major study on the "glass ceiling." This invisible but very real barrier, the Labor Department found, has kept many minorities and women off the highest rungs of the corporate ladder.
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | May 4, 1992
Washington -- If she hadn't fallen for the short, spunky Texan who made her laugh, hadn't agreed to wear his Navy ring and wait for him as he sailed around the world, she would have stayed in Baltimore after college and pursued a career in social work as she'd planned.But a year after her 1955 graduation from Goucher College, Margot Birmingham married the Naval Academy class president she'd met on a blind date in Annapolis. And the only social work the wife of H. Ross Perot would ever come to know would be in the glossy, moneyed, champagne world of Dallas society and philanthropy.
NEWS
By Patricia Elam and Patricia Elam,Special to The Sun | June 1, 2008
On the coffee table in Ernest Green Jr.'s Washington corner office sits a gumball machine filled with gourmet jelly beans. The other surfaces display civil rights-era photos of Green, as well as more recent pictures of him with heavy-hitters such as former President Bill Clinton, former boxer Muhammad Ali, former Vice President Al Gore and U.S. Rep. John Lewis of Atlanta. Then there is another large and compelling photo, on a wall by itself. It shows a bare-chested black man in shackles.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun Columnist | July 11, 2007
The consensus: Working around the clock isn't worth it. Nearly two dozen readers responded to last week's piece on whether New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg's advice on work ethic resonates. Here's a short recap: Bloomberg told graduates of City University of New York's College of Staten Island that "if you're the first one in the morning and the last one to leave at night and you take fewer vacation days and never take a sick day, you will do better than the people who don't do that.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby * | August 8, 1991
He has never owned a John Deere, but Robert L. Walker brings a hefty harvest of administrative experience to his new job as Maryland's third agriculture secretary.He is a past president of the Baltimore City School Board, served as an executive with Esskay, an old-line, Baltimore meat-processing company, and has been the No. 2 guy at the state Agriculture Department since 1987."I've always been on the agri-business side of agriculture," Mr. Walker said. "As a production farmer, no, I haven't had any direct experience at farming."
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1995
EA Engineering, Science, and Technology Inc. reported lower-than-expected earnings for its fiscal fourth quarter yesterday and said it had laid off about 25 administrators and executives to improve profitability.The Hunt Valley-based environmental testing and cleanup firm said its net profits fell by more than half, to $305,000, in the three months that ended Aug. 31, from $616,000 in the same period last year.At the same time, revenues grew to $19.2 million, from $17.3 million in the fourth quarter of 1994.
NEWS
By Patricia Elam and Patricia Elam,Special to The Sun | June 1, 2008
On the coffee table in Ernest Green Jr.'s Washington corner office sits a gumball machine filled with gourmet jelly beans. The other surfaces display civil rights-era photos of Green, as well as more recent pictures of him with heavy-hitters such as former President Bill Clinton, former boxer Muhammad Ali, former Vice President Al Gore and U.S. Rep. John Lewis of Atlanta. Then there is another large and compelling photo, on a wall by itself. It shows a bare-chested black man in shackles.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun Columnist | July 11, 2007
The consensus: Working around the clock isn't worth it. Nearly two dozen readers responded to last week's piece on whether New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg's advice on work ethic resonates. Here's a short recap: Bloomberg told graduates of City University of New York's College of Staten Island that "if you're the first one in the morning and the last one to leave at night and you take fewer vacation days and never take a sick day, you will do better than the people who don't do that.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 18, 2005
CHICAGO -- Conrad Black, the former press magnate who built Hollinger International Inc. into the world's third-largest publisher of English-language newspapers, was charged yesterday with helping steal $51.8 million from the company. The 61-year-old former chairman and chief executive officer of Hollinger International and three former company executives were accused of wire fraud and mail fraud in an 11-count indictment unsealed in U.S. District Court in Chicago. Prosecutors issued an arrest warrant for Black, who has been a British lord since 2001.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 26, 2005
Who says prime-time television never deals with differences in social class? Consider this moment from the third season premiere of The Simple Life: Interns, as job skills-impaired Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie climb into overalls to start work at a Quality Auto Muffler Center in Bayonne, N.J.: "So, is this, like, blue collar or white collar?" Hilton asks, complaining about having to wear "polyester" without underwear. "This is blue," Richie says with a degree of certainty remarkable for her. "And, like, white is better?"
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1997
Eight Crown Central Petroleum Corp. workers filed a potential class action lawsuit against the company in Texas yesterday, alleging that it has "maintained a system of discrimination" at its two refineries there.The federal lawsuit, filed by six women and two men against the Baltimore-based oil company, claims Crown has denied pay raises and promotions to women and black employees at the refineries, and engaged in a pattern of sexual harassment and racial discrimination since at least June 1995.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch | February 25, 1996
Spring approaches, threatening a bloom of predatoryfull-length mirrors and slacks that never fit off the rack. We are not particularly enthused.We are fortunately not disfigured, disabled, handicapped or qualified to participate in Little People support groups. We merely stand some inches beneath the average American male height of nearly 5-foot-10."Ha, ha, maybe 5-7 with a tail wind" is the usual answer to the direct height question.The question surfaces indirectly but incessantly this time of year, as the change of season turns us toward new clothes.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1997
Eight Crown Central Petroleum Corp. workers filed a potential class action lawsuit against the company in Texas yesterday, alleging that it has "maintained a system of discrimination" at its two refineries there.The federal lawsuit, filed by six women and two men against the Baltimore-based oil company, claims Crown has denied pay raises and promotions to women and black employees at the refineries, and engaged in a pattern of sexual harassment and racial discrimination since at least June 1995.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2014
Calvin G. Butler Jr. came to Baltimore nearly three years ago with one foot here and the other in Chicago, flying west on weekends to his wife and two teenagers. Now he's firmly in this region. His family moved to Cockeysville last summer. He's on two local nonprofit boards. And on Saturday, he took the helm at one of the city's largest employers, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. He's glad his stretch as a nomadic exec is over. And he's not the only one. "What I recognize is that I have a very patient wife," he said.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1995
EA Engineering, Science, and Technology Inc. reported lower-than-expected earnings for its fiscal fourth quarter yesterday and said it had laid off about 25 administrators and executives to improve profitability.The Hunt Valley-based environmental testing and cleanup firm said its net profits fell by more than half, to $305,000, in the three months that ended Aug. 31, from $616,000 in the same period last year.At the same time, revenues grew to $19.2 million, from $17.3 million in the fourth quarter of 1994.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | October 24, 1994
The editor called the reporter into her office. "I have a story idea. Why don't you do something about flattery in the workplace? We even have a headline: 'The Age of Obsequiousness.' ""I believe," the reporter said slowly, searching for the precise words to describe her feelings, "that this is a great idea. I'll get right on it."Flattery. Kissing up. Call it ingratiation, if you prefer psychological jargon. Or call it by its coarse -- yet far from crudest -- name: sucking up.But if you have an ounce of honesty or self-awareness, you know you do it. You know you love it when someone does it to you. And you know you are outraged when you see others doing it."
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