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By LESTER A. PICKER | December 20, 1993
Passion isn't normally a word we associate with corporate charitable giving programs.Yet, I had no sooner taped a commentary on corporate charity for the program "Marketplace" on National Public Radio when I received calls taking positions on either side of mine. Some callers favored a more vigorous corporate giving program; others were opposed.But it was more than two months later when a most interesting, and passionate, letter arrived at my door.It had been routed to me through The Sun (my editor, obviously taking his cue from the U.S. Postal Service, keeps them in a pile for maybe six months before forwarding)
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NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | July 8, 2014
Supreme Court conservatives continue to insist that corporations have the same rights as people on matters ranging from making campaign donations (Citizens United) to raising religious objections to government policies (Hobby Lobby). Meanwhile, anti-tax conservatives continue to argue that corporations are inhuman and it's foolish to tax them because the cost will be passed along to actual humans. Forget for a moment the contradictory notion that a corporation increasingly enjoys the same civil protections of a living, breathing person yet conveniently reverts to an inanimate entity when it comes to fiscal responsibility.
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BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | April 8, 1991
In 1989, American businesses gave away some $6 billion to charities, certainly no small amount of money. Yet, that sum represents a mere 5 percent of all charitable giving, and only about 2 percent of pre-tax corporate profits on average. But, corporations are in business to earn a profit; if a corporation folds, everyone loses, most especially those in need of social services.The bottom line on corporate philanthropy is that corporations give in their own enlightened self-interest. They give to support educational reform because they are experiencing problems with the work force; they give to the arts because it enhances the quality of life in their community.
NEWS
February 9, 2014
Only in Maryland can politicians get away with the double-speak of calling the slight lowering of one of the nation's highest corporate tax rates a "give away" ( "Brown attacks Gansler for favoring corporate tax cut," Feb. 5). Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown also calls lowering corporate taxes to a level that is still higher than most other states "a reckless corporate tax handout. " Maybe when the last corporation has left Maryland for another state with a more reasonable tax burden, he will realize the true meaning of "a corporate give away.
FEATURES
By George Gunset and George Gunset,Chicago Tribune | December 27, 1990
CHICAGO -- Corporate budget-cutters may be taking a hard look at the bottom line, but where charitable contributions are concerned, there's still a soft spot for the needy.If anyone suffers from a slowdown of corporate giving, it's likely to be arts and cultural activities.In 1983, following the last recession, total cultural giving declined 15 percent, while total corporate donations jumped 25 percent, according to the American Association of Fund-Raising Counsel."From talking with other people in the field, I believe corporate giving patterns are changing," said Sara Levy, manager of community relations for R.R. Donnelley & Sons Co. "There is deep concern to protect programs already being funded and a tendency to direct funding to core needs of society."
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | July 29, 1991
The headline of a recent issue of The Chronicle of Philanthropy, a professional publication for non-profit organizations, boldly pronounced: "Corporate Gifts Harder To Obtain." So, what else is new? Corporate gifts have always been difficult for non-profits to nail down, especially for smaller or more controversial charities.The facts are clear. While individual donors gave more than $100 billion to charities in 1990, corporations gave only $6 billion.What intrigues me the most, though, is the flip side of the corporate charity equation, namely how corporations are responding to requests from non-profit organizations.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | November 9, 1992
This is the first of three columns about corporate philanthropy.Listening to John Schisler talk, one immediately senses the value of experience. Recently retired from Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. after 37 years, 23 of them heading up its corporate giving programs, Schisler agreed to give a straight-talking, half-day workshop on soliciting funds from corporations. Everyone with whom I spoke was impressed.The workshop was one of a series offered by the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers, a non-profit, 50-member organization of groups that make significant charitable contributions to non-profits in the region.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | August 31, 1992
I had two very interesting, albeit diametrically opposed, discussions last week. In one case, a development director for a local non-profit complained of the confusion she said emanated from corporate charitable-giving circles nowadays. In the other case, a corporate client confessed his confusion over a barrage of requests for funding from non-profits that were threatening to bury his desk. Hmmmm.What is going on may not be difficult to understand. Resolving the problem is a lot more difficult.
NEWS
November 4, 1990
United Way of Central Maryland is behind in campaign contributions, but officials pin the problem on slow returns rather than a sluggish economy."I don't see any indication the economy is having an adverse effect," said Mel Tansill, a United Way spokesman. "But companies are not reporting as fast as they did last year."Mr. Tansill said the 1991 campaign, which ends Nov. 15, had collected $15.2 million as of Friday. That amount is less than half of the organization's $34.7 million goal. Last year, United Way was more than 50 percent toward its target by this time.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | November 16, 1992
Last week, I wrote about the hard work it takes to win corporate donations. Many of the suggestions were similar to those offered by John Schisler, former head of corporate giving for C & P Telephone, as part of a workshop sponsored by the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers.So, after six phone calls and a confirmation letter, you've finally landed a 15-minute appointment with the chief executive officer. Have you brought the right people with you? I strongly advise organizations to bring a knowledgeable board volunteer along, which strengthens the non-profit's case.
BUSINESS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun Reporter | November 22, 2006
Patricia Desiderio Corporate gift specialist Patty's Gifts and Baskets LLC, Forest Hill Age --53 Years on the job --Four Salary --$40,000 to $50,000, depending on number of clients. How she got started --About eight years ago, Desiderio bought a basket as a gift for a sick friend and thought to herself, "I bet I can start a basket business." At the time, she was making wreaths and other crafts for local country stores. Although Desiderio's first two attempts at the basket business failed, she did a year and a half of research, which included taking community college courses to learn how to write a business plan.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | April 23, 2006
Some of the same economic development tools that sparked the creation of the B&O Railroad in 1827 and hundreds of other Maryland companies over the years soon will be available to farmers for the first time. In 2004, the General Assembly created the Maryland Agricultural & Resource-Based Industry Development Corp., a quasi-public economic development organization designed to help farmers and agricultural and other rural businesses. And during this year's recently ended legislative session, lawmakers approved the first round of funding for the organization, commonly referred to as MARBIDCO.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Howard Libit and David Nitkin and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2002
GOOD-GOVERNMENT types who want to limit the role of money in politics have a growing if somewhat arcane target to aim for: the candidate slate. Maryland's campaign finance laws are generally strict, limiting individuals and corporations to maximum donations of $4,000 to a candidate committee and a total of $10,000 to all candidates during a four-year election cycle. But savvy politicians can bypass those limits, through loopholes in rules applying to slates of multiple candidates. The use of the technique is on the rise as elected officials come to appreciate its benefits.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 13, 1996
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton and his wife, Hillary, donated 10 percent of their income to charity last year, an example praised yesterday by charitable groups.For the second year in a row, the Clintons gave about $30,000 to charity, according to their 1995 return made public yesterday. Their income was just over $316,000.Details of the Clintons' charitable giving were not released but White House press secretary Mike McCurry said roughly two-thirds went to the three churches the family attend regularly.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | April 18, 1995
Washington. -- If a donkey flies, is it niggling to ask how high?That is the question raised by the well-meaning -- but not very forceful -- report about America's afflicted inner cities just issued by the prestigious, CEO-led Committee for Economic Development.In any season, it's tough for big corporations to deal with struggling neighborhoods.First of all, a crowd that reveres the capitalist machine has to admit it doesn't work well for everyone all the time. And to acknowledge that existing corporate investment partnerships in inner city housing and supermarkets aren't sufficient to reverse the tide of decline.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | October 2, 1994
When Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. speaks, hundreds of non-profit organizations listen carefully.As Baltimore has lost corporate headquarters to other cities over the years, as recessions and economic shifts have unsettled old assumptions, the corporate largess that many local groups depend on to sustain their programs have been put at risk.But BGE remains a corporate mainstay in Baltimore and, despite layoffs and restructuring, sound and profitable. It also remains one of the area's leading sources of corporate contributions.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | October 2, 1994
When Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. speaks, hundreds of non-profit organizations listen carefully.As Baltimore has lost corporate headquarters to other cities over the years, as recessions and economic shifts have unsettled old assumptions, the corporate largess that many local groups depend on to sustain their programs have been put at risk.But BGE remains a corporate mainstay in Baltimore and, despite layoffs and restructuring, sound and profitable. It also remains one of the area's leading sources of corporate contributions.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | April 18, 1995
Washington. -- If a donkey flies, is it niggling to ask how high?That is the question raised by the well-meaning -- but not very forceful -- report about America's afflicted inner cities just issued by the prestigious, CEO-led Committee for Economic Development.In any season, it's tough for big corporations to deal with struggling neighborhoods.First of all, a crowd that reveres the capitalist machine has to admit it doesn't work well for everyone all the time. And to acknowledge that existing corporate investment partnerships in inner city housing and supermarkets aren't sufficient to reverse the tide of decline.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | December 20, 1993
Passion isn't normally a word we associate with corporate charitable giving programs.Yet, I had no sooner taped a commentary on corporate charity for the program "Marketplace" on National Public Radio when I received calls taking positions on either side of mine. Some callers favored a more vigorous corporate giving program; others were opposed.But it was more than two months later when a most interesting, and passionate, letter arrived at my door.It had been routed to me through The Sun (my editor, obviously taking his cue from the U.S. Postal Service, keeps them in a pile for maybe six months before forwarding)
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