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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1997
The National Rifle Association and the Department of Natural Resources have reached an understanding that should help offset the high costs of processing deer meat donated to the hungry by Maryland hunters."
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HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
Officials at the University of Maryland have pledged to spend an additional $5 million on student mental health services at the state's flagship College Park campus over the next 10 years, the largest investment in counseling services there in decades. The decision was made this week following years of stagnant investments in psychiatric services at the university's counseling and health centers, despite large spikes in student demand. It comes on the heels of a murder-suicide involving a mentally ill student just off campus in February, which shined a spotlight on the imbalance between counseling services and demand.
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NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2001
When Mayor Martin O'Malley is in cheerleader mode, he likes to tout the growth of Baltimore's technology industry, the so-called Digital Harbor that has been attracting Internet, software and computer companies. But he is worried that the industry lacks the city's racial diversity. "Some people think the Digital Harbor is not for them," O'Malley said during a visit to Morgan State University's school of engineering yesterday. After meeting with Morgan State's top officials, O'Malley pledged to work more closely with the historically black Northeast Baltimore school to promote access to high-tech jobs for blacks.
NEWS
By Blythe Bernhard and Blythe Bernhard,McClatchey-Tribune | October 20, 2006
Every October, products from tweezers to toothpaste get packaged in pink. They're all sold with the promise of promoting breast cancer awareness or benefiting breast cancer charities. Breast cancer has become the darling disease of corporate philanthropy - especially during national breast cancer awareness month. But are the pink promotions more about boosting corporate profits via female-friendly marketing? Although heart disease and lung cancer kill more women each year, experts say breast cancer is considered safer for companies to latch onto.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1998
Relatives, neighbors and friends of a 4-year-old Crofton boy are trying to raise $150,000 to pay for a second bone marrow transplant and family expenses associated with the operation.David Raymond had the surgery in November at Children's Hospital in Boston and is still there in intensive care, said Dianne Hoffman, coordinator of the fund-raising campaign. His parents, Susan and Chris Raymond, are with him.David suffers from Hurler's Syndrome, a genetic disorder. Symptoms include heart disease, deafness, cornea clouding and mental retardation.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,Sun Staff Writer | November 28, 1994
Rocked by a $4 million deficit and allegations of freewheeling spending by top executives, the national board of the NAACP announced yesterday that most of the 88 office workers placed on unpaid leave will remain on unlimited furlough.Earl T. Shinhoster, interim senior administrator of the NAACP's national office in Baltimore, said in a brief prepared statement that 26 employees would return to work this week. Most are middle-level managers and administrators involved in fund-raising operations.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1998
Bell Atlantic officials say their decision in March to donate $250,000 for scholarships at Maryland's historically black institutions was a win-win situation. The donation put the state's colleges and universities one step closer to raising their $700 million goal by the year 2001. And for Bell Atlantic, it puts them one step closer to shaping their future employees."We have had a long and strong relationship with all of the universities," said Bell Atlantic Vice President John W. Dillon.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | August 15, 1995
It wasn't so much seeing the Great Wall of China for himself or touring Beijing that affected Eric Pickett so deeply. It was the people he and 12 other Annapolis High School students met on their recent 17-day tour of China."
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2001
Individual giving in Maryland remains low compared to other states, according to a study made public today, but foundation and corporate giving in the state is strong, and new forms of philanthropy are emerging. These are some of the findings of "The State of Giving in Maryland," released by the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers. It is the group's first statewide study of philanthropic trends. Betsy S. Nelson, executive director of the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers, says she hopes the study will encourage more giving in the state.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | March 7, 1994
FREDERICK -- Maryland's cash-strapped state parks, which attract millions of visitors each year, are beginning to solicit businesses for supplies ranging from trucks to toilet paper, as well as to underwrite outdoor programs.Seeking corporate dollars for park maintenance and improvements is part of a growing trend among park administrators nationwide.It's a trend that also draws a warning from the director of a national parks group, who cautions that, in luring corporate money, blatant commercialism needs to be avoided.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2001
Individual giving in Maryland remains low compared to other states, according to a study made public today, but foundation and corporate giving in the state is strong, and new forms of philanthropy are emerging. These are some of the findings of "The State of Giving in Maryland," released by the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers. It is the group's first statewide study of philanthropic trends. Betsy S. Nelson, executive director of the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers, says she hopes the study will encourage more giving in the state.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2001
When Mayor Martin O'Malley is in cheerleader mode, he likes to tout the growth of Baltimore's technology industry, the so-called Digital Harbor that has been attracting Internet, software and computer companies. But he is worried that the industry lacks the city's racial diversity. "Some people think the Digital Harbor is not for them," O'Malley said during a visit to Morgan State University's school of engineering yesterday. After meeting with Morgan State's top officials, O'Malley pledged to work more closely with the historically black Northeast Baltimore school to promote access to high-tech jobs for blacks.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1999
We have PSINet Stadium. Could we handle a PSINet Constellation Pier on the Inner Harbor?The Constellation Foundation has enlisted the Baltimore Ravens' sales and marketing team to help find a corporate sponsor to donate $1 million to the old warship in exchange for the right to bolt its name to the ship's Visitors Center on Pier 1."We believe this naming opportunity offers significant marketing value," said foundation Chairwoman Gail Shawe. "The recent Ravens deal with PSINet demonstrates their expertise and we are confident they will be equally successful on behalf of the Constellation Foundation."
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1998
Bell Atlantic officials say their decision in March to donate $250,000 for scholarships at Maryland's historically black institutions was a win-win situation. The donation put the state's colleges and universities one step closer to raising their $700 million goal by the year 2001. And for Bell Atlantic, it puts them one step closer to shaping their future employees."We have had a long and strong relationship with all of the universities," said Bell Atlantic Vice President John W. Dillon.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1998
Relatives, neighbors and friends of a 4-year-old Crofton boy are trying to raise $150,000 to pay for a second bone marrow transplant and family expenses associated with the operation.David Raymond had the surgery in November at Children's Hospital in Boston and is still there in intensive care, said Dianne Hoffman, coordinator of the fund-raising campaign. His parents, Susan and Chris Raymond, are with him.David suffers from Hurler's Syndrome, a genetic disorder. Symptoms include heart disease, deafness, cornea clouding and mental retardation.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1997
The National Rifle Association and the Department of Natural Resources have reached an understanding that should help offset the high costs of processing deer meat donated to the hungry by Maryland hunters."
BUSINESS
By David Conn | November 18, 1991
Last fall, the downtown Hyatt Regency hotel was resplendent. More than 500 guests, in tuxedos and evening gowns, circulated through 12 artfully decorated rooms, each featuring a celebrity cook whipping up gourmet meals for the guests. The Baltimore-area March of Dimes' sixth annual "Gourmet Gala," raised more than $100,000 for the organization's fight against infant mortality.But this year only three companies -- compared to 12 in 1990 -- agreed to donate $5,000 each toward the event. By mid-September, after Maryland National Bank, USF&G Corp.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
Officials at the University of Maryland have pledged to spend an additional $5 million on student mental health services at the state's flagship College Park campus over the next 10 years, the largest investment in counseling services there in decades. The decision was made this week following years of stagnant investments in psychiatric services at the university's counseling and health centers, despite large spikes in student demand. It comes on the heels of a murder-suicide involving a mentally ill student just off campus in February, which shined a spotlight on the imbalance between counseling services and demand.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | August 15, 1995
It wasn't so much seeing the Great Wall of China for himself or touring Beijing that affected Eric Pickett so deeply. It was the people he and 12 other Annapolis High School students met on their recent 17-day tour of China."
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,Sun Staff Writer | November 28, 1994
Rocked by a $4 million deficit and allegations of freewheeling spending by top executives, the national board of the NAACP announced yesterday that most of the 88 office workers placed on unpaid leave will remain on unlimited furlough.Earl T. Shinhoster, interim senior administrator of the NAACP's national office in Baltimore, said in a brief prepared statement that 26 employees would return to work this week. Most are middle-level managers and administrators involved in fund-raising operations.
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