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Corporate Citizenship

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Robert B. Reich | July 16, 2014
Dozens of big U.S. corporations are considering leaving the United States in order to reduce their tax bills. But they'll be leaving the country only on paper. They'll still do as much business in the U.S. as they were doing before. The only difference is they'll no longer be "American" and won't have to pay nearly as much in taxes to the U.S. government. OK. But if they're no longer American citizens, they should no longer be able to spend a penny influencing American politics.
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NEWS
Robert B. Reich | July 16, 2014
Dozens of big U.S. corporations are considering leaving the United States in order to reduce their tax bills. But they'll be leaving the country only on paper. They'll still do as much business in the U.S. as they were doing before. The only difference is they'll no longer be "American" and won't have to pay nearly as much in taxes to the U.S. government. OK. But if they're no longer American citizens, they should no longer be able to spend a penny influencing American politics.
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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 3, 2000
BELFAST, Maine - When the nearby town of Lincolnville needed a new school in a hurry, MBNA America Bank built one in 54 days, in time for the September opening of school. When an ice storm paralyzed Belfast, the credit card services giant opened a 150-bed emergency shelter in a vacant building, flew in nurses from its Delaware headquarters and operated it with volunteers for two weeks. Since MBNA chose Maine for its Northeast regional operations in late 1992, it has been changing the way of life in communities along this stretch of coast.
NEWS
June 16, 2012
We are encouraged to see the recognition of the corporate citizenship of Under Armour and the Baltimore Ravens in Baltimore City schools ("Protecting Baltimore's house," June 11). We applaud the commitment to community of both organizations and we agree with The Sun that to make a meaningful impact, efforts such as these should go beyond one project or one day of volunteering. To truly make a lasting impact, we believe citizenship must be part of a company's DNA. Many business leaders share Mr. Plank's and Mr. Bisciotti's belief that private industry can help formulate solutions to community challenges, not only through their own personal contributions but by instituting a culture of giving back within their companies.
BUSINESS
By Abbe Gluck and Abbe Gluck,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1996
The International Youth Foundation yesterday kicked off its move to Baltimore by telling local leaders that corporate citizenship is one of its first orders of business."
NEWS
December 13, 2004
Area chamber among top four finalists for citizenship award The Baltimore-Washington Chamber of Commerce was named one of four finalists nationally for the 2004 Corporate Citizenship Awards, presented by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's Center for Corporate Citizenship. The chamber is a finalist for the U.S. Chamber Community Service Award. The chamber staff produces and manages an annual one-day mathematics symposium for middle- and high-school teachers, which is in its 11th year. The program, for math teachers in Howard, Anne Arundel, Prince George's and Montgomery counties, provides an opportunity for the region's business community to present real-world mathematics to teachers so they can better prepare their students for the business world.
NEWS
June 12, 2012
I note with admiration and respect the substantial philanthropic commitments of both Under Armour founder Kevin Plank and Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti to Baltimore City's schools, and to the Baltimore region generally. However, I find The Sun's recognition of their significant corporate citizenship to the region ("Protecting Baltimore's house," June 11) strangely out of sync with past statements about the irrelevance of losing other corporate headquarters. Specifically, on these same pages, The Sun considered whether the loss of Constellation Energy, our last Fortune 500 company, had any relevance ("America's branch town," March 18)
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | September 21, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley received a public service award last night from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. O'Malley was singled out for his efforts as mayor of Baltimore to tackle the city's persistent crime problem and its struggling school system. The organization also lauded O'Malley's creation of CitiStat, calling it "a highly useful accountability tool that later won Harvard University's prestigious Innovations in American Government award." Other honorees were Robert E. Fischell of Angel Medical Systems, and Steve Geppi, a local businessman and minority owner of the Orioles who received a corporate citizenship award.
NEWS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | January 18, 2006
Whether it's to build a better image or fulfill a mission of community service, being a good corporate citizen is no longer a fad in the workplace. These days many large companies have philanthropic arms while others sponsor teams at charity walk-a-thons and marathons to raise money for various causes including relief efforts for the victims of Hurricane Katrina. In recent years, companies have been creating employee volunteer programs to encourage workers to get involved in their communities.
NEWS
June 16, 2012
We are encouraged to see the recognition of the corporate citizenship of Under Armour and the Baltimore Ravens in Baltimore City schools ("Protecting Baltimore's house," June 11). We applaud the commitment to community of both organizations and we agree with The Sun that to make a meaningful impact, efforts such as these should go beyond one project or one day of volunteering. To truly make a lasting impact, we believe citizenship must be part of a company's DNA. Many business leaders share Mr. Plank's and Mr. Bisciotti's belief that private industry can help formulate solutions to community challenges, not only through their own personal contributions but by instituting a culture of giving back within their companies.
NEWS
June 12, 2012
I note with admiration and respect the substantial philanthropic commitments of both Under Armour founder Kevin Plank and Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti to Baltimore City's schools, and to the Baltimore region generally. However, I find The Sun's recognition of their significant corporate citizenship to the region ("Protecting Baltimore's house," June 11) strangely out of sync with past statements about the irrelevance of losing other corporate headquarters. Specifically, on these same pages, The Sun considered whether the loss of Constellation Energy, our last Fortune 500 company, had any relevance ("America's branch town," March 18)
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | September 21, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley received a public service award last night from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. O'Malley was singled out for his efforts as mayor of Baltimore to tackle the city's persistent crime problem and its struggling school system. The organization also lauded O'Malley's creation of CitiStat, calling it "a highly useful accountability tool that later won Harvard University's prestigious Innovations in American Government award." Other honorees were Robert E. Fischell of Angel Medical Systems, and Steve Geppi, a local businessman and minority owner of the Orioles who received a corporate citizenship award.
NEWS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | January 18, 2006
Whether it's to build a better image or fulfill a mission of community service, being a good corporate citizen is no longer a fad in the workplace. These days many large companies have philanthropic arms while others sponsor teams at charity walk-a-thons and marathons to raise money for various causes including relief efforts for the victims of Hurricane Katrina. In recent years, companies have been creating employee volunteer programs to encourage workers to get involved in their communities.
NEWS
December 13, 2004
Area chamber among top four finalists for citizenship award The Baltimore-Washington Chamber of Commerce was named one of four finalists nationally for the 2004 Corporate Citizenship Awards, presented by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's Center for Corporate Citizenship. The chamber is a finalist for the U.S. Chamber Community Service Award. The chamber staff produces and manages an annual one-day mathematics symposium for middle- and high-school teachers, which is in its 11th year. The program, for math teachers in Howard, Anne Arundel, Prince George's and Montgomery counties, provides an opportunity for the region's business community to present real-world mathematics to teachers so they can better prepare their students for the business world.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2002
BUFFALO, N.Y. - There probably is no other person who has had a greater impact on the city of Buffalo than Robert G. Wilmers. He's helped turn around a poorly performing urban elementary school, saved the philharmonic from bankruptcy, preserved a house built by Frank Lloyd Wright, worked to shave millions from the city's budget and pledged millions from his own pocket to improve the local zoo. Yet, most people in Buffalo don't know who he is. "Robert...
NEWS
By Levi Rabinowitz | February 6, 2002
KENNETH L. LAY'S sudden decision to pull out of testimony he was scheduled to give before a Senate committee Monday is certain to create "blowback" for chief executive officers and corporate board members. Blowback is what happens when shortsighted decision-making comes back to haunt you in ways that are more dangerous than the original threat. It's obvious that Enron's former CEO and insiders didn't say what they knew when they knew it. Early evidence indicates they did just the opposite: The insiders and the CEO misled or, more graphically, lied to the rest of us. Corporate image and the personal reputations of even the best and brightest CEOs are being harmed as this crisis in corporate leadership unfolds.
NEWS
By Levi Rabinowitz | February 6, 2002
KENNETH L. LAY'S sudden decision to pull out of testimony he was scheduled to give before a Senate committee Monday is certain to create "blowback" for chief executive officers and corporate board members. Blowback is what happens when shortsighted decision-making comes back to haunt you in ways that are more dangerous than the original threat. It's obvious that Enron's former CEO and insiders didn't say what they knew when they knew it. Early evidence indicates they did just the opposite: The insiders and the CEO misled or, more graphically, lied to the rest of us. Corporate image and the personal reputations of even the best and brightest CEOs are being harmed as this crisis in corporate leadership unfolds.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2002
BUFFALO, N.Y. - There probably is no other person who has had a greater impact on the city of Buffalo than Robert G. Wilmers. He's helped turn around a poorly performing urban elementary school, saved the philharmonic from bankruptcy, preserved a house built by Frank Lloyd Wright, worked to shave millions from the city's budget and pledged millions from his own pocket to improve the local zoo. Yet, most people in Buffalo don't know who he is. "Robert...
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 3, 2000
BELFAST, Maine - When the nearby town of Lincolnville needed a new school in a hurry, MBNA America Bank built one in 54 days, in time for the September opening of school. When an ice storm paralyzed Belfast, the credit card services giant opened a 150-bed emergency shelter in a vacant building, flew in nurses from its Delaware headquarters and operated it with volunteers for two weeks. Since MBNA chose Maine for its Northeast regional operations in late 1992, it has been changing the way of life in communities along this stretch of coast.
BUSINESS
By Abbe Gluck and Abbe Gluck,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1996
The International Youth Foundation yesterday kicked off its move to Baltimore by telling local leaders that corporate citizenship is one of its first orders of business."
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