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NEWS
September 4, 2013
You don't have to be a Marxist to conclude that the working conditions of millions of American workers today are akin to wage-slavery ("Jobs are coming back, but they don't pay enough," Aug. 27). According to columnist Robert Reich, the shareholders of the mega-corporation that operates Taco Bell, KFC and Pizza Hut received a 15 percent return on their investment. Meanwhile, large numbers of the fast-food workers who deliver their products don't earn enough to rise above the poverty line.
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 13, 2014
In recent weeks, the managers, employees and customers of a New England chain of supermarkets called Market Basket have joined together to oppose the board of director's decision in June to oust the chain's popular chief executive, Arthur T. Demoulas. Their demonstrations and boycotts have emptied most of the chain's 71 stores. What was so special about Arthur T., as he's known? Mainly, his business model. He kept prices lower than his competitors, paid his employees more, and gave them and his managers more authority.
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NEWS
April 25, 2011
Of course the former president and CEO of McDonald's USA wants to pit young Americans against their elders ("New nonprofit lets youth fight back against AARP," April 24). That way we will fight each other instead of the corporate interests that are ruining our economy and way of life. AARP is "nothing but a giant lobbying organization" with "a weight far beyond what they ought to have"? Sounds more like corporate America to me. Patricia Vido, Owings Mills
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | October 9, 2013
Over a year ago, I sent my fingerprints for a standard foreign background check to the U.S. State Department in Washington, D.C., along with a money order. Both promptly disappeared, never to be seen again. A personal survey of those around me suggested that this was standard operating procedure -- which is why I suspected that America wouldn't exactly implode if this kind of federal "service" level was formally kneecapped. Still, in shock there also lies opportunity. Sure, a few politicians have announced that they would donate their salaries to charity during the federal government shutdown -- but only right before plunging their heads back into the trough of public cash.
NEWS
May 12, 2013
Sandy Apgar, an erstwhile pretender to being a public servant during the Clinton era, enthusiastically recommends that Maryland fall into the public-private partnership trap along with benighted states like Virginia ("The future of infrastructure," May 9). I'd like to know how inviting the pork farmers to engage in policy-making and priority-setting to increase the price of pork is going to benefit Mr. Apgar's "taxpayers. " I'm one of those taxpayers; the fat-cat corporations Mr. Apgar would woo with my money, not so much, according to the COST figures columnist Dan Rodricks cites in his column about CEO whining ("Complaining CEOs need to take a hike," May 9)
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 7, 2013
Job growth is sputtering. So why aren't the captains of American industry and finance -- the nation's top CEOs, the titans of Wall Street, the corporate movers and shakers -- demanding that more be done to revive the economy? They have the political clout to make it happen. It can't be they don't know that job growth is sputtering. The data are indisputable. July's job growth of 162,000 jobs was the weakest in four months. The average workweek was the shortest in six months. The Bureau of Labor Statistics has also lowered its estimates of hiring during May and June.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 31, 2002
NEW YORK -- Members of the Democratic Leadership Council, which fashions itself the pro-business, pro-growth arm of the party of Jefferson and Jackson, gave corporate America a pretty good going-over for its corruption and greed at their annual meeting here this week. They joined the general assault on CEOs for the disclosures of various sorts of financial hanky-panky that sent the stock market in a spin and have created widespread apprehension among investors. Democratic Sen. Joe Lieberman of Connecticut, traditionally a champion of businessmen, characterized some of them as "con artists and thieves" who, "to satisfy their personal greed," were busy "wringing the last dollar out of their cooked books."
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | October 9, 2013
Over a year ago, I sent my fingerprints for a standard foreign background check to the U.S. State Department in Washington, D.C., along with a money order. Both promptly disappeared, never to be seen again. A personal survey of those around me suggested that this was standard operating procedure -- which is why I suspected that America wouldn't exactly implode if this kind of federal "service" level was formally kneecapped. Still, in shock there also lies opportunity. Sure, a few politicians have announced that they would donate their salaries to charity during the federal government shutdown -- but only right before plunging their heads back into the trough of public cash.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,The Evening Sun | May 25, 1991
INDIANAPOLIS -- Willy T. Ribbs walked into his afternoon news conference a few minutes late."I'm really sorry about the delay," Ribbs said. "But I just got back from court, where I officially had my name changed to Willy T. McRibbs."If anyone deserved a break today, it was Ribbs, who announced he'd signed with McDonald's as his first major corporate sponsor.Ribbs, driving for the Derrike Walker team, is the first black to qualify for the Indianapolis 500. And he has done it virtually without the support of corporate America.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO | March 7, 2007
So far in my seven-year career, I've had - count them - one female boss who has directly supervised me. It's even harder to think of many top-tier female managers I know. I point this out not because I don't like male managers, but because my experience seems to reflect a larger concern about the dearth of female leaders in corporate America. Despite some highly publicized appointments of women in executive roles during the past year, a new study of women corporate officers, top earners and directors in Fortune 500 companies shows that the number of females holding corporate officer positions declined in 2006.
NEWS
September 4, 2013
You don't have to be a Marxist to conclude that the working conditions of millions of American workers today are akin to wage-slavery ("Jobs are coming back, but they don't pay enough," Aug. 27). According to columnist Robert Reich, the shareholders of the mega-corporation that operates Taco Bell, KFC and Pizza Hut received a 15 percent return on their investment. Meanwhile, large numbers of the fast-food workers who deliver their products don't earn enough to rise above the poverty line.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 7, 2013
Job growth is sputtering. So why aren't the captains of American industry and finance -- the nation's top CEOs, the titans of Wall Street, the corporate movers and shakers -- demanding that more be done to revive the economy? They have the political clout to make it happen. It can't be they don't know that job growth is sputtering. The data are indisputable. July's job growth of 162,000 jobs was the weakest in four months. The average workweek was the shortest in six months. The Bureau of Labor Statistics has also lowered its estimates of hiring during May and June.
NEWS
May 12, 2013
Sandy Apgar, an erstwhile pretender to being a public servant during the Clinton era, enthusiastically recommends that Maryland fall into the public-private partnership trap along with benighted states like Virginia ("The future of infrastructure," May 9). I'd like to know how inviting the pork farmers to engage in policy-making and priority-setting to increase the price of pork is going to benefit Mr. Apgar's "taxpayers. " I'm one of those taxpayers; the fat-cat corporations Mr. Apgar would woo with my money, not so much, according to the COST figures columnist Dan Rodricks cites in his column about CEO whining ("Complaining CEOs need to take a hike," May 9)
NEWS
April 9, 2013
Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s Sunday columns are usually thought-provoking, but not always in the way he intended. His latest opinion piece laments the vastly expanded entitlement economy - what he calls "a European-style welfare state" ("How the welfare state has grown," April 7). Although few objective observers would describe the U.S. social safety net that way, most people recognize that our current spending on these programs is not sustainable in the long term. However, like Mitt Romney before him, Mr. Ehrlich seems uninterested in how this state of affairs came to be, other than blaming "big government.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 10, 2012
As is the case every two years, it's being demonstrated once again that the Olympics are the opiate of the sports-watching American public. Patriotism is breaking out all over this country as our athletes, particularly the women, rack up gold and other medals at an inspirational pace. The summer games happen to coincide with our quadrennial decision on whether we as a people want to keep the president we have or vote for another one. And in this exercise, too, we are experiencing a predictable outbreak of wearing our patriotism on our sleeves, regardless of party.
NEWS
By David Horsey | May 15, 2012
If money is the mother's milk of politics, then America's big corporations are Big Mama, and Big Baby is the Republican Party suckling at the enormous bosom of business. Democrats, meanwhile, are abandoned brats scrounging for nourishment wherever they can find it. During the long decades the Democrats held a solid majority in Congress, campaign donations from the corporate world were spread around between incumbents in both parties -- not evenly, but at least the D's got their share.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | November 7, 1993
As evidence mounts that many mass layoffs of the early 1990s backfired, more and more companies are approaching new layoffs with a revised strategy: removing the poorest performers.They've resolved not to lose so many good workers to indiscriminate pink slips or broad early retirement offers -- moves that reduced productivity, hurt customer service and deepened losses. This time, they say, the layoffs will be different.This time, it's personal."We have learned you don't do it by instinct, by section or by groups," said Al Kamhi, a spokesman for Bethesda-based Martin Marietta Corp.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 30, 2000
SO HERE'S the question: How stupid are you? Let's say on a scale of one to 10, with 10 being the average supermodel. How stupid do you figure? Yes, I know I'm being awfully rude. It's just that lately I find myself deeply annoyed at the way your feeble-mindedness -- and more importantly, mine -- are considered a foregone conclusion by the people who make and market the stuff we buy. I refer you to the fine print of an automotive ad I saw the other day on television. Doesn't matter which one, because they're all the same.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | June 27, 2011
In its decision to throw out the sex discrimination lawsuit filed by 1.6 million women workers against retail giant Wal-Mart, the Supreme Court concluded that there was insufficient evidence that each of these women - who worked at different jobs and in different states - had been harmed in the same way. In other words, in order to file a class-action suit, the plaintiffs must have more in common than just their sex. And, by the way, they need...
NEWS
April 25, 2011
Of course the former president and CEO of McDonald's USA wants to pit young Americans against their elders ("New nonprofit lets youth fight back against AARP," April 24). That way we will fight each other instead of the corporate interests that are ruining our economy and way of life. AARP is "nothing but a giant lobbying organization" with "a weight far beyond what they ought to have"? Sounds more like corporate America to me. Patricia Vido, Owings Mills
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