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NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 12, 1993
DOUGLAS, Isle of Man -- The people on this island in the Irish Sea are only slowly accepting the conventions of modern Europe.They have abolished hanging. They have voided their laws against homosexuals. Now they are being asked to formally throw away the cane and the birch, the last-resort measure of corporal punishment for the violent and incorrigible.Are they ready to go that far? Are the Manx people, as they like to refer to themselves after the Celtic language once spoken on the island, ready to embrace the '90s and be truly modern?
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NEWS
September 15, 2014
The National Football League received more domestic violence-related bad news last week with the arrest of Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson, who was charged over the weekend in Texas with reckless or negligent injury to a child. The allegation is that he used a tree branch or "switch" to spank his 4-year-old son, who suffered cuts and bruises to his back, buttocks, ankles and legs. Given that this was Texas, a state not normally given to condemning spanking of children as a disciplinary tool, one presumes that the injuries the preschooler suffered — because he allegedly failed to share his video game with a sibling — were pretty harsh.
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NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau | March 26, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The five small counties that have corporal punishment in their schools under Maryland law may not use it much, but they don't want to give it up.They came close to losing it yesterday, however, when a Senate bill proposing a statewide ban on corporal punishment failed for the lack of one vote.Sen. Idamae Garrott, D-Montgomery, said she plans to ask for reconsideration today in hopes that she will pick up the 24 votes necessary for passage of her bill.The ban on corporal punishment is a perennial bill in Annapolis, but it has seldom come so close to passage in the Senate.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
It seems Easter was a field day for attacking Dr. Ben Carson for his conservative views ("Ben Carson's biblically based conservatism," March 31.) Columnist Dan Rodricks claimed he was not surprised by Dr. Carson's equating gays with pedophiles and people who have sex with animals. Mr. Rodricks then delved into a 2008 radio interview for more dirt to support his critique of Dr. Carson's conservatism, showing how Dr. Carson used the Bible to support such things as corporal punishment by parents and as justification of a flat tax. Well perhaps more people need to be seeking answers in the Bible or in their faith.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau | March 26, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The five small counties that have corporal punishment in their schools under Maryland law may not use it much, but they don't want to give it up.They came close to losing it yesterday, however, when a Senate bill proposing a statewide ban on corporal punishment failed for the lack of one vote.Sen. Idamae Garrott, a Montgomery County Democrat and former teacher, said she plans to ask for reconsideration today in hopes that she will pick up the 24 votes necessary for passage of her bill.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 21, 1999
LIVERPOOL, England -- Philip Williamson is on a mission to put the sting back into British classroom discipline.With the Bible as his guide and a now idle paddle as his instrument, the soft-spoken principal of the Christian Fellowship School is a proponent of the judicious use of corporal punishment.He's even prepared to go to a human rights court for the right to strike students who cross a disciplinary line."We're talking about a smack on the hand or the leg," Williamson says. "Nothing to damage or injure the child, but to give them a clear message that what they have done is very wrong."
NEWS
By Scott D. Krugman and Wendy G. Lane | March 19, 2010
When one adult hits another, Maryland law defines this as assault. When a larger, stronger adult hits a child, this act can be interpreted under Maryland law as "reasonable" discipline. We find it difficult to understand why it is acceptable to hit a child with an object such as a belt, when it is always unacceptable to hit another adult, either with a fist or anything else. "Spare the rod ... spoil the child" has guided child rearing for thousands of years. Almost all parents have used physical (or corporal)
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 1, 2010
We'd be a better country if adults stopped hitting kids, and despite what the cynics and hard-heads say, we're already on the way. A comprehensive national report issued in February found a significant and unprecedented drop in child abuse since 1993. The main reason cited was greater awareness and public intolerance of the problem. More people are paying attention. Social workers, cops, teachers, principals, doctors, nurses and daycare workers have all been trained to recognize abuse and report it. More people are speaking up. More people are getting the message: Stop hitting kids.
NEWS
September 15, 2014
The National Football League received more domestic violence-related bad news last week with the arrest of Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson, who was charged over the weekend in Texas with reckless or negligent injury to a child. The allegation is that he used a tree branch or "switch" to spank his 4-year-old son, who suffered cuts and bruises to his back, buttocks, ankles and legs. Given that this was Texas, a state not normally given to condemning spanking of children as a disciplinary tool, one presumes that the injuries the preschooler suffered — because he allegedly failed to share his video game with a sibling — were pretty harsh.
NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau | March 28, 1992
SENATECorporal punishment ban OK'd, goes to HouseThe Maryland Senate voted yesterday to ban corporal punishment in the rural counties that still allow it, despite objections from lawmakers who said corporal punishment makes Eastern Shore schools better than their urban counterparts.The Senate vote was 27-19 to approve a statewide ban on corporal punishment just two days after the measure had failed, one vote short of a majority.The bill now moves to the House of Delegates, which in previous years has introduced and supported similar legislation.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 30, 2013
I am not among the many who are shocked that Ben Carson, the brilliant and widely admired neurosurgeon based at Johns Hopkins Hospital, would emerge as a hero of the political right and Sean Hannity's new best friend. That Carson would stoop to making (and later sort of apologizing for) homophobic remarks on Hannity's national television show - associating gays with pedophiles and people who have sex with animals - didn't surprise me, either. I know: Here's a man who separated conjoined twins, improved and saved the lives of countless children, established a scholars program that has benefited hundreds of young people, wrote inspirational books and gave countless motivational speeches.
NEWS
October 10, 2012
As a Baltimore native and former 25-year Texas resident who has recently returned to Maryland, please allow me to correct Susan Reimer 's misrepresentation of Texas public schools ("From the land of Rick Perry, the proud paddlers," Oct. 8). Texas public schools are regulated by local school districts called Independent School Districts. Each district makes its own rules. Some have zero tolerance policies that have led to 7-year-olds being suspended for their haircuts or hugging other students.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
You may have seen some of the carrying on about Charlie Fuqua, a lawyer running for the state legislature in Arkansas who has recommended in a book the death penalty for rebellious children .  Let's not get carried away. He also says that it would be extremely rare for parents to kill their own children, and that it can only be done when the proper procedures are carried out, as the Book of Deuteronomy prescribes. (Not quite clear to me why so many of the devout appear to pay more attention to the Old testament than the New, but that's just me.)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2011
Emily C. Wolfson, a gadfly and educational watchdog who advocated for Baltimore County public schools for more than 50 years and was also a Liberty Road-area activist, died Aug. 2 at her Randallstown home. She was 89. Mrs. Wolfson took her own life, said her daughter-in-law, Mary Catherine Wolfson of Granite. "Emily was one of those matriarchs we have in Baltimore County who always had an opinion and was mostly right," said Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. "She always cared where things could go. She wasn't a naysayer and always saw the glass half-full and wondered why we couldn't fill it to the top," he said.
SPORTS
By George Diaz, Tribune newspapers | June 8, 2011
Kyle Busch has a problem. He has a problem with Kevin Harvick. He has a problem driving on city streets, going 83 mph faster than the posted speed limit. He has a problem keeping any sort of gentleman's decorum on the racetrack, assuming he has a free pass to play bumper cars with anybody who gets in his way. Busch is like a 2-year-old without adult supervision. His owner, Joe Gibbs, certainly isn't up to the task. And neither are folks like Brian France and Mike Helton from NASCAR, who have given Busch a "probation" for some of his antics.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 1, 2010
We'd be a better country if adults stopped hitting kids, and despite what the cynics and hard-heads say, we're already on the way. A comprehensive national report issued in February found a significant and unprecedented drop in child abuse since 1993. The main reason cited was greater awareness and public intolerance of the problem. More people are paying attention. Social workers, cops, teachers, principals, doctors, nurses and daycare workers have all been trained to recognize abuse and report it. More people are speaking up. More people are getting the message: Stop hitting kids.
NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | May 2, 1993
To spank or not to spank. That is a perennial question parent face.Haim Ginott, a well-regarded child psychologist, tells a wonderful story that captures the inherent contradictions of corporal punishment.A mother is working in the kitchen frantically trying to cook dinner. Her 5-year-old son and his 3-year-old brother are playing with some toys on the floor nearby. The two boys start fighting over a toy and the older boy delivers a roundhouse punch to the head of his younger sibling, knocking him to the floor.
NEWS
By Susan Bitensky | November 22, 2006
EAST LANSING, Mich. -- The "horse whisperer," Monty Roberts, trains horses exclusively through nonviolent methods. We have the "dog whisperer," Cesar Milan, as well. Although he does not renounce all physical force in training dogs, he has condemned hitting them. The appearance of these animal whisperers is a heartening testament to our evolving regard for other species and a growing repugnance toward violence. Yet, the phenomenon also raises a question. Where are the child whisperers?
NEWS
By Scott D. Krugman and Wendy G. Lane | March 19, 2010
When one adult hits another, Maryland law defines this as assault. When a larger, stronger adult hits a child, this act can be interpreted under Maryland law as "reasonable" discipline. We find it difficult to understand why it is acceptable to hit a child with an object such as a belt, when it is always unacceptable to hit another adult, either with a fist or anything else. "Spare the rod ... spoil the child" has guided child rearing for thousands of years. Almost all parents have used physical (or corporal)
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