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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2002
State Sen. Larry E. Haines, leader of Carroll's legislative delegation and Senate minority whip, left Anne Arundel Medical Center yesterday afternoon with a near perfect bill of health, at least as far as his heart is concerned. Haines, a Republican, was hospitalized for almost a day after complaining of severe chest pains Monday evening. "I am doing well, and I am thankful that I have no coronary disease," Haines, 63, said shortly before he was discharged from the Annapolis-area hospital yesterday afternoon.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2012
Dr. Robert E. "Bob" Mason, a Baltimore internist and cardiologist who developed the standard stress test that has saved countless lives worldwide, died Wednesday of pneumonia at the Brightwood retirement community in Lutherville. He was 95. "He was always wonderfully good-natured, upbeat, mild, self-retiring and there was never any braggadocio about him. He was intellectual beyond compare," said Dr. E. Hunter Wilson, a retired internist who lives in Cross Keys. "He developed the stress test in the early 1960s, and was known for diagnosing and treating unusual cardiac problems," said Dr. Wilson.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2002
State Sen. Larry E. Haines, leader of Carroll's legislative delegation and Senate minority whip, left Anne Arundel Medical Center yesterday afternoon with a near-perfect bill of health, at least as far as his heart is concerned. Haines, a Republican, was hospitalized for almost a day after complaining of severe chest pains Monday evening. "I am doing well, and I am thankful that I have no coronary disease," Haines, 63, said shortly before he was discharged yesterday afternoon. He went to the State House infirmary about 8:45 p.m. Monday and was taken by ambulance to the hospital near Annapolis.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | June 19, 2008
On the X-ray image they printed out for me, trouble is a pink triangular speck, labeled LAD. The pink spot represents a calcium buildup - hardened plaque. And the LAD tag means the plaque lies in my "left anterior descending" coronary artery - the one cardiologists call "the widow maker." A blockage in the LAD tends to kill you. No one has said definitively that's what killed NBC newsman Tim Russert last week at the age of 58. But it wouldn't be a bad bet. Russert died after a heart attack in his Washington office.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | November 14, 1991
Knowing your cholesterol number may not be enough in the future to protect you from coronary heart disease. Recent studies suggest specific blood proteins may be more sensitive predictors of this major killer.Now, Dr. Peter Kwiterovich, chief of the Johns Hopkins Medical School's atherosclerosis clinic, has shown that in women, the Apo B blood protein level is a better predictor of the disease than the Apo A-1 level, while the opposite is true of men.Kwiterovich reported on his research yesterday at an American Heart Association scientific session in Anaheim, Calif.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2002
State Sen. Larry E. Haines, leader of Carroll's legislative delegation and Senate minority whip, left Anne Arundel Medical Center yesterday afternoon with a near-perfect bill of health, at least as far as his heart is concerned. Haines, a Republican, was hospitalized for almost a day after complaining of severe chest pains Monday evening. "I am doing well, and I am thankful that I have no coronary disease," Haines, 63, said shortly before he was discharged from the Annapolis-area hospital yesterday afternoon.
FEATURES
By SUSAN HIPSLEY and SUSAN HIPSLEY,Special to The Sun | June 25, 1995
"Oh, he's a Type A," someone might say, using what has become a bit of pop-psychology shorthand for describing someone who works -- and plays -- relentlessly and feels a constant time urgency.Since 1959, when Meyer Friedman and Ray Rosenman reported that men with those characteristics were seven times more likely than others to have heart disease and twice as likely to have heart attacks, most lay people have linked those competitive, hostile behaviors to coronary disease.But as the scientific study games go, the ball has been thrown quietly and slowly into another court of opinion.
NEWS
By From staff reports | November 20, 1998
Seven adjacent porch roofs on a block of rowhouses in Southwest Baltimore collapsed yesterday in a chain reaction that began at 266 S. Monastery Ave., near the middle of the block.No one was hurt in the collapse, which kept residents from their homes until early evening as the city housing department cleared enough debris to make doorways passable. The affected rowhouses are 256 to 268. Housing inspectors had not determined the cause of the collapse last night."I'm sitting in the back yard waiting to hear from my insurance company because we're not supposed to go inside," said the owner of 256, who did not want to be identified.
FEATURES
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,Los Angeles Times | June 16, 1993
A decade after Americans came to grips with the dangers of heavy drinking -- raising the legal drinking age to 21 and stiffening drunk-driving penalties -- a new debate has emerged: What are the risks and benefits of drinking moderately?In the scientific world, the debate centers on whether moderate consumption is good or bad for your health. But in the real world of conflicting business, social and political interests, the crucial issue is who will get to say what about alcohol.During the past year, wine industry officials have sought to promote the purported health benefits of wine consumption.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2012
Dr. Robert E. "Bob" Mason, a Baltimore internist and cardiologist who developed the standard stress test that has saved countless lives worldwide, died Wednesday of pneumonia at the Brightwood retirement community in Lutherville. He was 95. "He was always wonderfully good-natured, upbeat, mild, self-retiring and there was never any braggadocio about him. He was intellectual beyond compare," said Dr. E. Hunter Wilson, a retired internist who lives in Cross Keys. "He developed the stress test in the early 1960s, and was known for diagnosing and treating unusual cardiac problems," said Dr. Wilson.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | May 4, 2007
Researchers have identified genetic patterns that double the chance of having a heart attack and drastically increase the likelihood of suffering from heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States. The findings could lead to screening tests that would help people take early steps to prevent heart problems, to new therapies and to greater understanding of heart disease's biological roots, experts say. In one of two studies reported yesterday in the journal Science, researchers who compared DNA of 17,000 heart patients and healthy volunteers in Europe, the United States and Iceland found that someone carrying a set of genetic variants on Chromosome 9p21 is twice as likely to suffer an early heart attack.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2002
State Sen. Larry E. Haines, leader of Carroll's legislative delegation and Senate minority whip, left Anne Arundel Medical Center yesterday afternoon with a near-perfect bill of health, at least as far as his heart is concerned. Haines, a Republican, was hospitalized for almost a day after complaining of severe chest pains Monday evening. "I am doing well, and I am thankful that I have no coronary disease," Haines, 63, said shortly before he was discharged yesterday afternoon. He went to the State House infirmary about 8:45 p.m. Monday and was taken by ambulance to the hospital near Annapolis.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2002
State Sen. Larry E. Haines, leader of Carroll's legislative delegation and Senate minority whip, left Anne Arundel Medical Center yesterday afternoon with a near perfect bill of health, at least as far as his heart is concerned. Haines, a Republican, was hospitalized for almost a day after complaining of severe chest pains Monday evening. "I am doing well, and I am thankful that I have no coronary disease," Haines, 63, said shortly before he was discharged from the Annapolis-area hospital yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2002
State Sen. Larry E. Haines, leader of Carroll's legislative delegation and Senate minority whip, left Anne Arundel Medical Center yesterday afternoon with a near-perfect bill of health, at least as far as his heart is concerned. Haines, a Republican, was hospitalized for almost a day after complaining of severe chest pains Monday evening. "I am doing well, and I am thankful that I have no coronary disease," Haines, 63, said shortly before he was discharged from the Annapolis-area hospital yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | October 7, 2001
A decade ago you decided to watch your cholesterol, so you avoided eggs, switched from butter to margarine and finally stopped eating much fat at all. Since then you've learned that eggs might not be as bad for you as everyone thought, margarine could be more deadly than butter, and not all fats are created equal. You want to tear your hair out when you hear that lowering your cholesterol too far below the recommended level might not be the best thing to do. Studies have suggested a link between very low cholesterol and depression.
NEWS
By From staff reports | November 20, 1998
Seven adjacent porch roofs on a block of rowhouses in Southwest Baltimore collapsed yesterday in a chain reaction that began at 266 S. Monastery Ave., near the middle of the block.No one was hurt in the collapse, which kept residents from their homes until early evening as the city housing department cleared enough debris to make doorways passable. The affected rowhouses are 256 to 268. Housing inspectors had not determined the cause of the collapse last night."I'm sitting in the back yard waiting to hear from my insurance company because we're not supposed to go inside," said the owner of 256, who did not want to be identified.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | May 23, 1995
Q: My doctor has expressed concern about my risk for coronary disease because my menstrual periods stopped a few months ago, my blood pressure is high and heart attacks seem to run in my family. I usually have a glass of wine, and sometimes even two, with dinner each night, but the conflicting statements about the risks and benefits of alcohol have me confused. Can you clarify whether alcohol is helpful or harmful?A: Studies have found that moderate alcohol intake, when compared with either no alcohol or heavy alcohol intake, lowers the mortality rate among men, primarily by reducing the frequency of fatal coronary events.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | May 4, 2007
Researchers have identified genetic patterns that double the chance of having a heart attack and drastically increase the likelihood of suffering from heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States. The findings could lead to screening tests that would help people take early steps to prevent heart problems, to new therapies and to greater understanding of heart disease's biological roots, experts say. In one of two studies reported yesterday in the journal Science, researchers who compared DNA of 17,000 heart patients and healthy volunteers in Europe, the United States and Iceland found that someone carrying a set of genetic variants on Chromosome 9p21 is twice as likely to suffer an early heart attack.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1997
In a reminder that heart disease starts developing years before symptoms show, Johns Hopkins researchers have uncovered a connection between apparently healthy people who are stressed and early signs of trouble in their hearts.The finding, published today in the journal Circulation, focused on adults with siblings who suffered from heart disease before age 60. But experts say its relevance is much broader, for it helps explain the role of stress in the development of coronary artery disease.
FEATURES
By SUSAN HIPSLEY and SUSAN HIPSLEY,Special to The Sun | June 25, 1995
"Oh, he's a Type A," someone might say, using what has become a bit of pop-psychology shorthand for describing someone who works -- and plays -- relentlessly and feels a constant time urgency.Since 1959, when Meyer Friedman and Ray Rosenman reported that men with those characteristics were seven times more likely than others to have heart disease and twice as likely to have heart attacks, most lay people have linked those competitive, hostile behaviors to coronary disease.But as the scientific study games go, the ball has been thrown quietly and slowly into another court of opinion.
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