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By Craig Nakano and By Craig Nakano,Special to the Sun | August 25, 2002
The tour guide held up a 1901 photo that was instantly recognizable but nonetheless befuddling. Surely that was the Hotel Del Coronado in the distance, the Southern California landmark with its unmistakable Victorian cupolas rising above the Pacific shore. But in the foreground, where Coronado's 15-story condominium towers now cast a shadow toward the Hotel Del's red-roofed whimsy, the grainy picture showed something different: Tent City. For $4.50 per week, the oceanfront view came with all the basics a vacationer needed: canvas roof and walls, bed, dresser, washbasin and flush toilets.
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TRAVEL
By Craig Nakano and By Craig Nakano,Special to the Sun | August 25, 2002
The tour guide held up a 1901 photo that was instantly recognizable but nonetheless befuddling. Surely that was the Hotel Del Coronado in the distance, the Southern California landmark with its unmistakable Victorian cupolas rising above the Pacific shore. But in the foreground, where Coronado's 15-story condominium towers now cast a shadow toward the Hotel Del's red-roofed whimsy, the grainy picture showed something different: Tent City. For $4.50 per week, the oceanfront view came with all the basics a vacationer needed: canvas roof and walls, bed, dresser, washbasin and flush toilets.
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1998
Coronado's Quest begins his long-shot quest for racing's 3-year-old championship today in the $150,000 Dwyer Stakes at Belmont Park.Owned by Stuart S. Janney III of Butler in Baltimore County, Coronado's Quest ranks behind only three 3-year-old colts in Daily Racing Form's weekly Top 40: Real Quiet, No. 5; Victory Gallop, No. 8, and Indian Charlie, No. 24. Coronado's Quest ranks No. 28, one spot ahead of another 3-year-old, Favorite Trick.Janney said he believes the race for an Eclipse Award in the 3-year-old male division is wide-open despite the dominance of the Triple Crown by Real Quiet and Victory Gallop.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1998
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Coronado's Quest arrived about 6 a.m. yesterday after an all-night plane ride and van excursion from Belmont Park. The 3-year-old colt was the last of the Breeders' Cup Classic contenders to take up residence at Churchill Downs.His trainer, Shug McGaughey, said the decision to compete in the Classic was based on the fact that some 3-year-olds run the race of their lives late in the year, just as some older horses are tailing off.The perfect scenario for Coronado's Quest, he said, would be for Skip Away and Gentlemen to hook up early, and for Coronado's Quest to race at their heels, poised for one late run.Stuart S. Janney III , the Marylander who owns three-quarters of Coronado's Quest, visited the barn.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1998
OCEANPORT, N.J. -- Before the Preakness Stakes, trainer Elliott Walden said he didn't want to run Victory Gallop, who had finished second in the Kentucky Derby, against Coronado's Quest.In fact, the day that trainer Shug McGaughey declared that Coronado's Quest would run, Walden responded by saying that Victory Gallop would not. Only after top contenders Indian Charlie and Halory Hunter dropped out -- and Victory Gallop flashed a readiness to race -- did Walden enter the bay colt.But then, the day before the Preakness, Coronado's Quest bruised a foot and was scratched.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1998
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. -- A man turning 50 might choose to put his feet up, take a deep breath and relax.But yesterday at Saratoga, in the final moments of the Travers Stakes, Stuart S. Janney III's heart nearly burst out of his chest. Coronado's Quest, his horse through good times and bad, surged toward the finish line as two powerful thoroughbreds, Victory Gallop and Raffie's Majesty, charged relentlessly, closing the gap with each heart-pounding stride.When the three game horses passed under the wire separated by inches, Coronado's Quest was a nose in front.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1998
Coronado's Quest begins his march to the Kentucky Derby today in the $100,000 Hutcheson Stakes at Gulfstream Park.Owned by Stuart S. Janney III, a resident of Butler in Baltimore County, the chestnut colt makes his 3-year-old debut in a race tarnished by the late defection of Lil's Lad. The fifth-ranked Kentucky Derby contender according to the Daily Racing Form, Lil's Lad will run instead in an allowance race today at Gulfstream Park.(Lil's Lad's race and the Hutcheson will be shown on ESPN in a broadcast beginning at 4: 30 p.m.)
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1998
HALLANDALE, Fla. -- The mystery of the Florida Derby, and perhaps even the Kentucky Derby, swirls like a twister inside the mind of a strikingly handsome chestnut colt named Coronado's Quest.The horse is so calm around the barn that nearly every afternoon, when his trainer sets out the evening feed, he is lying down. But before a race, once the jockey sits on his back, he sometimes stops, freezes and refuses to move -- until the jockey hops off, and then he won't let the jockey back on.Tantrums follow -- bucking, twisting, burning precious energy.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1998
HALLANDALE, Fla. -- Coronado's Quest stands poised again to challenge the top 3-year-olds in the East. On Saturday, the colt owned by Stuart S. Janney III will meet familiar rivals in the Florida Derby at Gulfstream Park.But the star of the day might be unveiled about four hours earlier.Favorite Trick, the 1997 Horse of the Year, will make his 1998 debut on the Florida Derby undercard in the Swale Stakes, a seven-furlong race worth $100,000. Bill Mott, the colt's trainer, said the Swale and then probably the 1 1/8 -mile Toyota Blue Grass Stakes on April 11 at Keeneland will be Favorite Trick's only auditions for the grand ball, the Kentucky Derby on May 2 at Churchill Downs.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1998
Coronado's Quest perches atop "Derby Dozen" as precariously as a tufted titmouse clings to a pine tree during a hurricane.And the Forty Niner colt owned by Stuart S. Janney III and trained by Shug McGaughey will probably remain there, barring a training setback, until the Florida Derby on March 14 at Gulfstream Park. But then, Coronado's Quest must flash Kentucky Derby promise -- or fall by the waste-side as many of those wonderfully bred, high-priced, faltering 3-year-olds trained by D. Wayne Lukas.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1998
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. -- A man turning 50 might choose to put his feet up, take a deep breath and relax.But yesterday at Saratoga, in the final moments of the Travers Stakes, Stuart S. Janney III's heart nearly burst out of his chest. Coronado's Quest, his horse through good times and bad, surged toward the finish line as two powerful thoroughbreds, Victory Gallop and Raffie's Majesty, charged relentlessly, closing the gap with each heart-pounding stride.When the three game horses passed under the wire separated by inches, Coronado's Quest was a nose in front.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1998
OCEANPORT, N.J. -- Before the Preakness Stakes, trainer Elliott Walden said he didn't want to run Victory Gallop, who had finished second in the Kentucky Derby, against Coronado's Quest.In fact, the day that trainer Shug McGaughey declared that Coronado's Quest would run, Walden responded by saying that Victory Gallop would not. Only after top contenders Indian Charlie and Halory Hunter dropped out -- and Victory Gallop flashed a readiness to race -- did Walden enter the bay colt.But then, the day before the Preakness, Coronado's Quest bruised a foot and was scratched.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1998
Coronado's Quest begins his long-shot quest for racing's 3-year-old championship today in the $150,000 Dwyer Stakes at Belmont Park.Owned by Stuart S. Janney III of Butler in Baltimore County, Coronado's Quest ranks behind only three 3-year-old colts in Daily Racing Form's weekly Top 40: Real Quiet, No. 5; Victory Gallop, No. 8, and Indian Charlie, No. 24. Coronado's Quest ranks No. 28, one spot ahead of another 3-year-old, Favorite Trick.Janney said he believes the race for an Eclipse Award in the 3-year-old male division is wide-open despite the dominance of the Triple Crown by Real Quiet and Victory Gallop.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1998
ELMONT, N.Y. -- Coronado's Quest, the pre-race Preakness favorite scratched because of a bruised foot, returns today in the Riva Ridge Stakes, a Grade II $125,000 seven-furlong sprint on the Belmont Stakes undercard.Although the Riva Ridge is a far cry from the $1 million Belmont, the colt's owner, Stuart S. Janney III of Butler, Md., is pleased that he's healed, happy and apparently back in the hunt."I would have loved to run in the Belmont," Janney said. "But I think we're doing right by the horse bringing him back in this spot.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1998
During the first week after the Kentucky Derby, the Preakness resembled an episode of the Twilight Zone.Trainers and owners of prospective Preakness horses couldn't make up their minds whether to come or not. Nobody knew who was in, who was out, who was on the fence, who was waiting in the wings.You started wondering what could possibly be so unappealing about a million-dollar horse race -- the richest ever in Maryland -- scheduled at 5: 27 p.m. today at Pimlico.This past week, the Preakness turned into an Alfred Hitchcock film.
SPORTS
By TOM KEYSER and TOM KEYSER,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1998
Coronado's Quest, the enigmatic horse at the center of this year's Preakness drama, played his role to the hilt yesterday, coming down with a foot bruise and further tossing this second jewel of the Triple Crown into turmoil.The immensely talented -- but sometimes temperamental -- colt owned by Maryland's Stuart S. Janney III was scratched from today's Preakness. His defection robbed the race of its likely betting favorite and the one horse on which all eyes would have focused during the pre-race buildup.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1998
When a horse as fast as Coronado's Quest is on the fence for a race as big as the Preakness, one must check which way he leans.Yesterday, he leaned the same way as the day before.Stuart S. Janney III, his owner, said he and trainer Shug McGaughey still have not decided whether the colt will run in the Preakness next Saturday or the Metropolitan Handicap on May 25 at Belmont Park.McGaughey will be here today to saddle Draw for the Pimlico Special.'Hunter' arrivesHalory Hunter arrived yesterday at the Pimlico stakes barn, bringing to two the number of horses here for the Preakness.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1998
ELMONT, N.Y. -- Coronado's Quest, the pre-race Preakness favorite scratched because of a bruised foot, returns today in the Riva Ridge Stakes, a Grade II $125,000 seven-furlong sprint on the Belmont Stakes undercard.Although the Riva Ridge is a far cry from the $1 million Belmont, the colt's owner, Stuart S. Janney III of Butler, Md., is pleased that he's healed, happy and apparently back in the hunt."I would have loved to run in the Belmont," Janney said. "But I think we're doing right by the horse bringing him back in this spot.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1998
ELMONT, N.Y. -- The early favorite for Saturday's Preakness should be holed up in a barn at Pimlico, basking in the equine equivalent of superstar status as the buildup continues for the second jewel of horse racing's Triple Crown.But 2-1 Coronado's Quest went through his final workout at Belmont Park yesterday morning and will not arrive in Baltimore until just hours before the race.If that seems highly unusual, it is because Coronado's Quest is a highly unusual horse a horse with an attitude.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1998
After days of indecision by trainers and owners, the field for the 123rd Preakness Stakes is finally taking shape -- except for the two holdouts in Maryland.Black Cash is in. Basic Trainee is out. Spartan Cat and Chilito are still maybe.And back in Kentucky, where trainers Bob Baffert and D. Wayne Lukas prepare for tomorrow's trip to Baltimore, the sniping continues about Coronado's Quest. Baffert trains Derby winner Real Quiet and third-place finisher Indian Charlie, and Lukas trains fifth-place Derby finisher Cape Town.
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