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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | August 10, 2003
I have been suffering with an intractable combination of seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis. I've been using coal tar Tegrin and Cortaid cream with poor results. My face, ears and scalp have lots of itching, burning, scaling and redness. So when I read in your column that someone used cornstarch successfully for rosacea, I tried it. I wish I had taken pictures before and after. After four days, my skin is almost clear. I know these conditions tend to come and go, but this is the first "go" in a couple of years.
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NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN REPORTER | December 21, 2005
Did your Thanksgiving gravy turn out to be a disappointing companion to the turkey, mashed potatoes and dressing? Don't worry. There's still time to learn how to make a great gravy to serve with your Christmas and New Year's dinners. Chef Ian Vair, instructor at Baltimore International College, says the most common mistake cooks make in preparing gravy is not having the right proportions of fat, liquid and cornstarch or flour. There are two basic ways to make gravy. One begins with a roux, a mixture of fat and flour, and the other begins with a cornstarch slurry, a mix of cornstarch and cold water.
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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | February 1, 2004
I have to correct something I sent you a while ago. I have rosacea, and when I read that someone used cornstarch to control it, I tried it. I thought it was great and wrote to you. But I was mistaken. At the time, I was on a prescription antibiotic, Trimox, for recurrent bladder infections. After about six months my bladder infections decreased, and I was able to stop the Trimox. I started breaking out with rosacea again and realized it was the Trimox that had eliminated the redness, not the cornstarch.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 20, 2004
LONDON - Protesters in the British House of Commons hurled condoms full of purple cornstarch at Prime Minister Tony Blair yesterday, injuring no one but prompting an urgent examination of security. Two men, ages 50 and 36, were arrested. An organization called Fathers 4 Justice, which advocates greater child custody rights for men, claimed responsibility. The attack followed security lapses at Windsor Castle and the Big Ben bell tower and was made weeks after Parliament received an intelligence alert that it might be attacked with anthrax or ricin.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1999
An Anne Arundel County judge freed yesterday one of three teen-agers held in a juvenile jail since April 29 in an alleged bomb-making plot after tests showed that what authorities suspected was gunpowder seized from his home was flour and cornstarch.The 15-year-old did not react to the decision until his attorney, Patrick M. Smith, squeezed his shoulders and said, "You're going home today." Then he nodded and perked up.His mother left the courtroom with teary eyes but a smiling face. "I am very happy," she said.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1999
Lab results show that what investigators suspected was gunpowder seized from the home of one of three teen-agers accused in a bomb plot at Glen Burnie High School is flour and cornstarch, a defense lawyer said yesterday.Defense lawyer Patrick M. Smith and a spokeswoman for the state's attorney's office said they would ask today for the immediate release of the 15-year-old, who has been held at the Waxter Children's Center since April 29. The other two suspects are also being held at Waxter.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | January 27, 1993
In the depths of winter, when the days are cold and dreary, yearnings often turn to comfort food, especially Italian pasta dishes. This homey recipe developed by a Roman grandmother originally contained more cholesterol than you would want to know; our "nanas" were bent on soothing with creamy foods long before cholesterol became an issue.In our version, chicken broth replaces extra cream and cornstarch is the thickener rather than eggs and Parmesan. Tortellini, a stuffed pasta often described as "little hats," is the basis of many stories.
FEATURES
January 23, 1991
Pearl barley, located in the rice and noodle aisle, is an inexpensive way to stretch your food budget. Store the barley in an airtight container and refrigerate or freeze it for long-term storage.3%Vegetable Curry with Steamed Barley4 cups cooked pearl barley, directions below2 tablespoons vegetable oil2 medium onions, 8 ounces each1 clove garlic, minced1 to 2 tablespoons curry powder1 medium green pepper, diced1/2 cup sliced celery2 carrots, sliced1 medium zucchini, sliced 1/2 -inch thick1 cup chopped broccoli1 can 15 1/2 ounces garbanzo beans, drained2 cups chicken broth2 tablespoons cornstarch dissolved in 3 tablespoons waterPlace 1 1/3 cups pearl barley, four cups water and one teaspoon salt in large saucepan.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN REPORTER | December 21, 2005
Did your Thanksgiving gravy turn out to be a disappointing companion to the turkey, mashed potatoes and dressing? Don't worry. There's still time to learn how to make a great gravy to serve with your Christmas and New Year's dinners. Chef Ian Vair, instructor at Baltimore International College, says the most common mistake cooks make in preparing gravy is not having the right proportions of fat, liquid and cornstarch or flour. There are two basic ways to make gravy. One begins with a roux, a mixture of fat and flour, and the other begins with a cornstarch slurry, a mix of cornstarch and cold water.
FEATURES
May 22, 1991
Marinade:1 tablespoon dry sherry or Chinese rice wine1 teaspoon cornstarch1/4 teaspoon saltPinch of white pepperStir-Fry:1/2 pound medium raw shrimp, shelled and deveined1/4 pound sea scallops, cut in half horizontally1/2 pound asparagus2 tablespoons vegetable oil2 teaspoons minced garlic1/2 cup canned baby corn, drained1/2 cup whole water chestnuts1/2 cup chicken broth2 tablespoons dry sherry or Chinese rice wine1 teaspoon sesame oil1/2 teaspoon sugar1/2 teaspoon...
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | February 1, 2004
I have to correct something I sent you a while ago. I have rosacea, and when I read that someone used cornstarch to control it, I tried it. I thought it was great and wrote to you. But I was mistaken. At the time, I was on a prescription antibiotic, Trimox, for recurrent bladder infections. After about six months my bladder infections decreased, and I was able to stop the Trimox. I started breaking out with rosacea again and realized it was the Trimox that had eliminated the redness, not the cornstarch.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | August 10, 2003
I have been suffering with an intractable combination of seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis. I've been using coal tar Tegrin and Cortaid cream with poor results. My face, ears and scalp have lots of itching, burning, scaling and redness. So when I read in your column that someone used cornstarch successfully for rosacea, I tried it. I wish I had taken pictures before and after. After four days, my skin is almost clear. I know these conditions tend to come and go, but this is the first "go" in a couple of years.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | April 28, 2002
The concept is admirable: a restaurant that demonstrates how delicious Asian food can be without the fat and calories. From the moment it opened, Olive & Sesame was a hit. Owner John Luen, originally from Hong Kong, promised to use only healthful olive and sesame oils in his cooking. He would steam, grill and stir-fry his fresh seafood, white meat chicken and vegetables. He would use light soy sauce; and, of course, MSG would never make an appearance in his kitchen. The contemporary, angular interior of the restaurant had a look more Mediterranean than Chinese or Japanese, with a large painting of a Greek island dominating the room.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1999
An Anne Arundel County judge freed yesterday one of three teen-agers held in a juvenile jail since April 29 in an alleged bomb-making plot after tests showed that what authorities suspected was gunpowder seized from his home was flour and cornstarch.The 15-year-old did not react to the decision until his attorney, Patrick M. Smith, squeezed his shoulders and said, "You're going home today." Then he nodded and perked up.His mother left the courtroom with teary eyes but a smiling face. "I am very happy," she said.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1999
Lab results show that what investigators suspected was gunpowder seized from the home of one of three teen-agers accused in a bomb plot at Glen Burnie High School is flour and cornstarch, a defense lawyer said yesterday.Defense lawyer Patrick M. Smith and a spokeswoman for the state's attorney's office said they would ask today for the immediate release of the 15-year-old, who has been held at the Waxter Children's Center since April 29. The other two suspects are also being held at Waxter.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1999
A chance remark at work triggered memories of a pudding from childhood for James Kauffman, a chef who did not include his address. His mother used to make the pudding with cornstarch, he wrote. "It was reminiscent of tapioca pudding except it was silky smooth," he said. "All the great maternal ladies in the family are long gone. Hope you can help."Donna Amacher of Baltimore responded with a recipe. "This was a favorite of my family and originated from my mother-in-law in Pennsylvania. She would make it for our family each time we visited.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | October 21, 1992
It was near the end of the fresh strawberry season in Maryland when Bill Machuley of Baltimore requested a Haussner's strawberry pie recipe. Responses were overwhelming.Local berries have bitten the dust but not to worry. This strawberry treat is worth trying now and any season. Fresh berries from afar are available at your grocers. And, plan another pie when the local strawberries surface again next summer.Chef Syglowski of the Baltimore International Culinary College tested the responses and chose two which he notes "both have nice flavor but some changes are called for."
FEATURES
By Lucy Barajikian and Lucy Barajikian,LOS ANGELES TIME SYNDICATE | September 15, 1996
As a child, I lived in a rather exalted world. My father was a baker of pastries, and my brother and I lived in a continual sweet tooth paradise. Not only did desserts appear at every meal, but we spooned frosting straight from the bowl for treats, ate chocolate sprinkles and cashews by the handfuls, and crunched on silver dragees left over from decorating wedding cakes. Dentists loved us.I'm not about to dissolve in tears over those early health choices, but oh, my, how times have changed.
FEATURES
By Lucy Barajikian and Lucy Barajikian,LOS ANGELES TIME SYNDICATE | September 15, 1996
As a child, I lived in a rather exalted world. My father was a baker of pastries, and my brother and I lived in a continual sweet tooth paradise. Not only did desserts appear at every meal, but we spooned frosting straight from the bowl for treats, ate chocolate sprinkles and cashews by the handfuls, and crunched on silver dragees left over from decorating wedding cakes. Dentists loved us.I'm not about to dissolve in tears over those early health choices, but oh, my, how times have changed.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | January 27, 1993
In the depths of winter, when the days are cold and dreary, yearnings often turn to comfort food, especially Italian pasta dishes. This homey recipe developed by a Roman grandmother originally contained more cholesterol than you would want to know; our "nanas" were bent on soothing with creamy foods long before cholesterol became an issue.In our version, chicken broth replaces extra cream and cornstarch is the thickener rather than eggs and Parmesan. Tortellini, a stuffed pasta often described as "little hats," is the basis of many stories.
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